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In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

Although fashion design duo Ryan Lobo and Ramon Martin of Tome hail from Sydney, last week was the very first time the pair have shown at Fashion Week Australia. It was somewhat of a home coming for New York based Lobo and Martin.

Late last year we had the very good fortune of catching up with one half of Tome; an energised Ryan Lobo, for a wonderful short and snappy Chat in a Chair. With the heavily anticipated inaugural showing down under, we spoke with Lobo about what drives the creative dream that is Tome.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

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As a designer who strives to interpret the wondrous complexity of the female form, it is really no wonder that Lobo’s chair of choice is the iconic Eames® Moulded Plywood Lounge Chair, colloquially known as the ‘LCW’. With its compounded curves and exquisite minimalist configuration, it continues to feel contemporary seventy years since its inception. To Lobo, it is “…understated, casual, comfortable confidence”. It is a harmonious coupling – the sincerity of the LCW with the elegance of Lobo’s work – both sharing a sublime understanding of the fundamentals of basic beauty.

Lobo and Martin share a wealth of experience and an infectious passion for fashion, design and art. Recognising each other’s strengths early in their careers whilst studying a Bachelor of Design, Fashion at the University of Technology Sydney they took their time to come together with the knowledge that if they were ever to start a label, it would be together. Martin moved to Europe and the USA to work for Alberta Ferretti, Jean Paul Gaultier and Derek Lam and Lobo worked as a creative consultant, stylist and buyer for prominent Australian brands and magazines. Building their skills independently until the natural sense of time was ripe to come together has resulted in a well-rounded, mature and professional friendship. In 2011, with the world under their belt Tome was born (and remains still) within the world’s most inspiring creative metropolis, New York City.

Tome is not restricted to a place or a time rather, it celebrates the ‘every woman’ who dresses in the infinite wearability – clear cut, essential dressing – of Tome’s classic tailoring, soft silhouettes and seasonal hits of artistically-curated colour.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

Lobo & Martin have always found remarkable women, both historical and contemporary, to inspire creative stories. For their recent Cruise/Pre fall 2015 collection shown at Fashion Week Australia, Lobo and Martin revisited their teenage crush on the Sylvia Plath masterpiece ‘The Bell Jar’, touched by the depth of its aching beauty. They rediscovered their fascination by listening to voice recordings of Plath’s own voice reading poetry. The visions materialised with crisp structure and 50s-esque silhouettes in largely black and white with an almost restricted sense of femininity. Pieces that are coloured subvert the order of the tailoring with ensembles that pair the soft bodily tones of flesh pink with berry-stained red, and baby blue with electric blue. Sublime details peek through; arcs of lace, square pleats at the bottom of plunging necklines or a provocative slit to the front of a high necked blouse. All ensembles are bound at the waist or the neck with a suggestive gesture of restraint.

The Tome woman is of her time and of all time. She is a vision of both strength and vulnerability.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

Who are your favourite artists and why?
I have always loved formidable female artists and their practice. I learnt very young that women have been written out of the history books (well beyond the art world) and so I guess that spurred my interest in art created by women.

I was always intrigued by Hannah Höch, Fiona Hall, Louise Bourgeois, Shirin Neshat, Yoko Ono and Tracey Moffat to name a few.

Art and literature has always informed you work. How do you go about translating what you are inspired by into a marketable piece of clothing?
We are two men who make clothes for women so we miss out on the ultimate purpose of clothing – to actually wear it! So we don’t fall into fantasy with our clothes we select women as our muse for each collection, a kind of guiding light, and become absorbed in that woman’s world. We read about her life, her art practice, and are often as intrigued by her output as her inner life. We are often as attracted to the strictness of their work ethic as the sobriety of their personal style. It’s a mood as well as something literal. It’s very hard to put into words.

Your favourite works of fiction and non fiction and why?
Too hard!
Ok here goes: The Hungry Caterpillar, The Handmaid’s Tale, The God of Small Things, The House of Mirth, and all of Jeanette Winterson, because she is a literary master!
Non fiction: anything from Germaine Greer because she is a hero and a legend and should be taught and revered in schools!

Where else do you turn for inspiration creatively?
We are inspired by dance, music, costume and other designers!

Until now, you’ve never shown TOME in Australia. Can you tell us a little about living and working in NYC and what it has done for you and for TOME? How does it feel to show back home?
It is the most validating thing to be welcomed home with open arms. In the beginning it was really important for us to translate our laid-back and unfussy Australian aesthetic into a U.S. based brand. To bring our downtown NYC woman home to Sydney is a wonderful contrast to the beginning of the inception of Tome.

Living and working in NYC is a dream come true for so many reasons. It is where our homes are and it allows us access to the world.

What is the greatest lesson you have learnt about dressing women?
Never assume anything about who a woman is and what she wants! EVER!

Tell us about the chair of your choice, the Eames LCW…. What makes it special for you? What does the chair represent for you
It sums up my dream existence…understated, casual, comfortable confidence.

Credits:
Chat in a Chair Photography by Luisa Brimble
Runway Photography by Amanda Austin

CHAT IN A CHAIR: RYAN LOBO

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

In/Out: Tiro Tiro

Portland-based Tiro Tiro’s golden talismans are the creative genius of Teresa Robinson. They are like modern ceremonial embellishments with their graphic metal form and rough linen fringing.

Curvaceous shapes with finely pocked surfaces that create a dull lustred patina, are in sharp contrast with their feathered miniature manes. The necklaces; ‘Cercis’, ‘Campana’, ‘Iridis’ and ‘Sol’ hang ceremoniously from long snake chains. Modest and robust, the bangles resemble crowns and the fine rings of golden fat discs complete the story. The collection feels part Aztec part regimental regalia.

Tiro is latin for beginner or novice, in this case relating not to the negative connotations, but rather the experiment and improvisation that comes with a new creative mindset.

Credits: Tiro Tiro

TIRO TIRO

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

“Creating something is more like letting go than thinking,” says Sydney-based artist Ann Thomson. Celebrated for her intuitive expressive brushstrokes and superb colour combinations, Thomson’s new collection of ‘Variations’ reads like a visual diary, a perfect companion to the Sartorialist’s relaxed but sophisticated street style.

Free and brave big washes of soft tones are punctuated by distinct markings and bursts of intense colour. Bottle green, ochre, deep plums, royal blue, siren red, apricot, dusty blues, desert orange, blushing pink, deep green, warm browns all frolic together.

Rejoice in autumnal colours as the weather starts to cool and enjoy the last days of ‘Variations’ at Olsen Irwin Gallery.

Ann Thomson ‘Variations’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday: 12-5
Tuesday-Friday: 10-6
Saturday: 10-5
Sunday: 12-5
Until 14th March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Olsen Irwin GalleryThe Sartorialist

THIS & THAT: Ann Thomson

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Krysta Jabczenski

Arizonian Krysta Jabczenski lookbook for Bon boutique and Desert Vintage, is a whimsical feminine daydream-scape. Colourblocked explorers in a ghost town, these ladies are curious in a ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ kind of way.

Tulle skirts, sombreros and metallic slippers colourfully parade down sun-bleached streets. Black shirted and skirted with natural rattan hats, a classic look, against vivid white and Barragán-esque style walls.

Credits: Krysta Jabczenski

Krysta Jabczenski

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

In/Out: Valentino Fall 2015

Valentino’s Fall 2015 Menswear collection is a kaleidoscope of rich colour and form. Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri took their inspiration from the Parisian Ballet Russes, and the San Franciscan Beat Generation, for a bold free spirited ensemble.

Muddy deep tones of burgundy, burnt orange, both light and navy blue are punctuated by scarlet and royal blue. Geometric forms are repeated, mirrored and scaled, manipulating and enhancing the male form. Shoulders are exaggerated, chests are broader, and waists are pinched or belted with colour blocks. Chunky zippers are expressed on matching backpacks and even the runway conforms to this new brave tribal expression.

Although the spirit is a heady mix of Beat and Ballet, the geometric expression came from a chance online encounter with Melbourne-based artist Esther Stewart. When you view Stewart’s paintings the connection is immediate, strong graphic forms in solid colour with an intrinsic flair for palette combinations.

As Piccioli so succinctly puts it “Geometry is a new form of decoration”!

Credits: Style.com

Valentino Fall 2015 Menswear

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

In/Out - Marina Stanimirovic - Pearls Are Always Grey

French-born London-based Marina Stanimirovic ‘Pearls Are Always Grey’ collection of jewellery is effortlessly chic. Thin planes of Corian are embellished with 9ct gold, creating a new vision for ornamentation.

‘Pearl’ in ‘Pearls Are Always Grey’ is a reference to the Corian colour Stanimirovic uses in her pieces, a soft shade of grey with the inherent warmth of the material creating a tactile object, both peaceful and astute. Designed in pairs, each piece has a companion, a negative space where the touch of gold is found in the corresponding place on its mate. They are jewels made for lovers perhaps.. with the exception of the ‘Lonely Bracelet’, that has gold bands to the interior and exterior circumference, and the ‘U Necklace’, too bold to need another.

More and more we’re seeing this combination of the precious the utilitarian materials, echoes of which can be seen in the recent collections our local heroes Elke Kramer, and Dinosaur Designs. Architectural and malleable, material components, complement and redefine our traditional ideas of jewels. It’s a refreshing and contemporary approach to adornment, as Stanimirovic puts it “… I am trying to show the public another type of jewlery – another door has to be opened”.

Credits: Marina Stanimirovic

Marina Stanimirovic ‘Pearls are always Grey’

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

Nestled in a former Milan factory sits Carolina Castiglioni’s family home. Full of soul it is a treasure trove of vintage eclecticism, bursting with colourful vitality.

Carolina is the Director of Special Projects for Marni, and daughter of Marni’s Designer, the talented Consuelo Castiglioni. Looking at her house you can see why she would be perfect for such a job. It’s not overdesigned but a testament to her commitment for pieces that have historical context. As she puts it “I tend to gravitate towards vintage design that has a more innovative aspect”. Surrounded by heroes of the past certainly gives you the momentum to explore the future. Take for example the wonderful terrace chairs from Marni’s ‘Animal House’.

Shared with her husband, Architect Federico Ferrari, and their son, Filippo, first and foremost it is a family home full to the brim with things of beauty. Each piece loving sourced like the inky black dining table, initially in bad nick they restored the black lacquer to its now mirror finish. It’s a tribute to Carolina’s creative mind, and so with this insight into her daily life, we look forward to the next ‘special project’ from Marni.

Credits: The Selby

Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

We are very excited to bring you the first This&That for 2015! In this dreamy This&That American sisters Laura Naples and Kristen Giorgi – from NG Collective – and Korean photographer Kyung Soo Kim, court each other with bountiful colours in warm hues. Both layered and voluminous the soft palette is punctuated with inky black forms.

Kyung Soo Kim’s ‘Full Moon Story’ takes a fresh look at the ‘Hanbok’ (traditional Korean festival costume), provocative and intimate the subject seemingly unaware of the lens. Volumes of fabric in mauve, dusty pink, sage, light mustard and cream are gathered revealing petticoats and ruby red slippers. These static, cinematic, otherworldly princesses are hauntingly beautiful against such stark backgrounds.

NG Collective paintings are an ongoing narrative between two sisters. Abstract to the outsider, but filled with movement and colour, they are the dynamic representations of a family language.

Tradition flirts with the abstract, like the inner thoughts of Kyung Soo Kim’s subjects are laid bare in NG Collective’s paintings. Serene and reflective it’s a poignant match.

Credits: Kyung Soo KimNG Collective Studio

THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE STUDIO

In/Out: Kate Trouw - Spline

In/Out: Kate Trouw - Spline

In/Out: Kate Trouw - Spline

In/Out: Kate Trouw - Spline

In/Out: Kate Trouw - Spline

In/Out: Kate Trouw - Spline

Londoner Kate Trouw draws on her architectural background to create bespoke sculptural jewellery pieces. Formed from polymer clay they appear be-speckled and smooth, like exotic eggshells.

Chunky geometric forms in warm hues are bound together with simple waxed cotton cord. It’s this combination of the robust with the delicate that give ‘Bound’, ‘Circle’ and ‘Double Barrel’ necklaces such a beautiful equilibrium. Warm deep greys and soft whites are highlighted with hints of peach and butter, we especially love the yolky yellow bursts bookending the ‘Bound’ necklace.

Trouw’s ‘Spline’ collection feels like it would sit softly against your skin. Light and unassuming in materiality the pieces are a handsome study of composition and composure.

Credits: Kate Trouw

KATE TROUW

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

In/Out: KARIM RASHID'S HELL'S KITCHEN HOME

The never shy Cairo-born, NYC-based Karim Rashid opens the doors of his explosively colourful Hells Kitchen home. His reality is like a psychedelic lolly shop, something straight out of Willy Wonka’s factory. He doesn’t get called the Sparkle King for nothing. We can’t help but spot the sideboard of Bitossi soldiers Rashid’s own designs for the iconic italian ceramic house sitting lined up with the works of Ettore Sottsass and Piero Fornasetti.

Loud and proud, Rashid shares his technicolour home with his wife Ivana and daughter Kiva. Dancing to its own beat, this vibrant house is a gallery of inspiration for Rashid. As Rashid says “Living with all my stuff gets me into my own world… I can find the soul of my work”.

Dramatic pinks, acid greens, punchy purple and neon yellows are all amplified by the vivid white walls. His walk-in-robe is colour coded with his signature suits, like a storybook rainbow, all ready to be accessorised with a pair of equally lively glasses and trainers. The only thing missing is a Jeff Koons Balloon Dog!

Credits: NY MAG

Karim Rashid’s Hells kitchen Home

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