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Fashion

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

Preen by Thorton Bregazzi is the work of Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi. Their ready-to-wear Spring 2015 collection hit the catwalk with a blast of colour and pattern. Taking their inspiration from cricket, 80’s hip hop and the African Masai it’s no wonder they delivered a complex, layered look.

Renowned for deconstructing vintage looks with a penchant for the Victorian era, this new direction was much more athletic. It was a heady mix of asymmetrical, disassembled and collaged tailoring with exposed chunky plastic zippers, beaded fringing and quilted tops.

The patchworks of prints with strong linear graphics resembled jungle camo of the future. Hints of neon cheekily popped through black and white illustrations. Flowing florals were decidedly feminine, while strong sports stripes in red and navy were assertive.

Credits: Style.com

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015 Ready-to-Wear

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

London based Fashion Designer Lodha Saloni brings us a celebration of optimism in her Spring Summer 2015 collection. Vivid colours and spirited hand-painterly patterns are teamed up with confident, classic, feminine cuts.

Saloni designs for the free spirit. Her tailoring is suggestive, with a side of intelligence. Plunging necklines complement long sleeves or wide pants, bare shoulders fall down to mature hemlines, mini shorts and skirt lines are accompanied by jackets or loose tops with mid-length sleeves. Maxi, mini, capri, a-line, playsuit, flounce and flirt – its all here!

And how about those colours? Apricots, mustards, canary yellow, soft neutrals and then bang: king-parrot red, royal blue, apple, oak leaf and lime green, mandarin orange and boy blue. Its a heady mix, balanced beautifully across the collection.

Credits: Vogue

Saloni Spring Summer 2015 Ready-to-Wear

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

In/Out: Chloe Resort 2015

British designer Clare Waight Keller has come up trumps with her collection for Chloé this Resort 2015. Inspired by Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye in Poissy, Keller not only drew on the modernist architecture but also envisioned the experience between architectural form and the daily rituals of its occupants and their interaction with the interior spaces of the Villa.

The musings on this dialogue between the architecture and the interiors is represented by this collection of weighty enclosures of outer garments, sensuous and almost architectural silhouettes, upholstery-weight fabrics, and tiled geometric patterning. The garments’ very foundations, that of the human body, are exemplified by generous constructions of fabric belted and laced at the waist creating off centered swathes that dress and frame body structure. Delicate black and nude lace veils modest slips.

There is a very clear appreciation for the timelessly beautiful palette of the Villa Savoye in this collection’s vintage mustards, royal blues, emerald green, nudes and of course, its signature blacks and whites.

Credits: Chloé

Chloé Resort 2015

In/Out: Nina Donis

In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis

Muscovites, Nina Tatiana and Donis Pupis, are the creative duo behind fashion label Nina Donis. Not new to the scene having started their fashion label 14 years ago, their hard work has paid off. They are now considered to be at the head of Russia’s most influential designers.

Each garment is homogenous in colour with carefully orchestrated bold singular broad brushstrokes of contrasting colour – almost as if a paint roller has been applied. These are uniforms for the style conscious. Simple in form, the fabric choice and nominal embellishment is what gives them a deliciously breezy effect. They are construction worker, meets farm picnic, meets Japanese origami, meets an austere English sensibility with a rainy day melancholia.

Tatiana and Pupis have been tagged as ‘pioneers of the experimental minimalist design in Russia’. It’s an earnest compliment that is well deserved.

Credits: Thisispaper Magazine

Nina Donis

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

In/Out - Tome Resort 2015

Tome are strutting their luxurious wearable staples this season, their very first Resort collection. Designers Ryan Lobo and Ramon Martin are born and bred in Sydney, and now live the New York dream with Anna Wintour’s blessings.

Lobo and Martin’s use of mixed earthy tones, blushy pinks, mustard, buttery yellows, warm shades of brown and beige mixed in with orange, teal, navy, black and white is tender but lively. The way their silhouettes enclose the body and the detailing of the junctions has a vernacular appeal; pleated and zipped with considered drape and gape and tied with matching cord belts at waist and necks.

An essence of crunchy, shiny and metallic fabrics compliment predominantly smooth textiles. Two-toned lace and shiny raw silks with their uneven slumping, wrap with volume as oversized outer layers. High necks, articulated zippers and generous pockets add another layer to these graceful garments.

Jackie Nickerson‘s photographic show ‘Terrain’ of African farm workers provided an artistic muse for Lobo and Martin. It is no surprise that this collection also benefits their ‘White Shirt Project’ for ‘Freedom For All’, an on-the-ground organization that creates long-term, systemic changes to end slavery founded by Katie Ford. The Tome gents don’t plan one easing up on their fashion-meets-social agenda with intentions to set up factories where emancipated sex workers can train to sew. The white shirts they make will, in turn, benefiting others.

Credits: Tome

TOME RESORT 2015

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

In/Out- Toino Abel

Nuno Henriques, the driving force behind Toino Abel has returned to his family’s village, Castanheira, in Portugal. Going back to his roots, Henriques ensures that these enchanting traditional baskets founded by his great grandfather, José Custódio Barreiro, are kept alive in this modern world.

Toino Abel’s manufacturing is headed up by Henriques’s great aunt. She oversees six employees who have been making the baskets for decades. ‘Every step of the process is done by hand: The women cut the reed sticks into bunches of equal size, clean and dry them and clear their colour in a process of burning sulphur. Afterwards they colour the remaining darker pieces with colour pigments and weave them on a hand loom in a variety of patterns. The finished parts are being stitched together in the form of a bag. The handles of the baskets are made of willow branches that are bound and fastened onto the baskets.’

Toino Abel baskets speak of long lazy days full of romantic picnics, good food and wine, and fantastic company. Summer is on its way…

Credits: Toino Abel

TOINO ABEL

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In/Out: Satu Maaranen Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Satu Maaranen Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Satu Maaranen Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Satu Maaranen Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Satu Maaranen Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Satu Maaranen Spring Summer 2015

Since gradutating in 2012 from the Aalto University School of Arts in Design & Architecture, Finnish fashion designer Satu Maaranen has been setting the fashion world on fire.

Finnish born and bred to a life and love of the outdoors, she takes inspiration from nature and has been known to use sand, sawdust and grass in her designs. This, teemed with the inspiration from iconic design figures Marimekko and Christo, means Maaranen doesn’t shy away from big sweeping gestures and bold abstract expressions of painterly colour.

Her use of colour and form is awe-inspiring. Ridgid yet soft, her designs are full of personality, almost inhabiting the wearer. We just love those brave brushstrokes of colour.

Credits: Thisispaper

Satu Maaranen Spring Summer 2015

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With brilliantly billowing and voluminous bursts of radiance, these fellow explorers of colour and movement are a match truly made. Today’s This&That features the work of Kim Keever, a seasoned New York artist who began his practice back in the 70’s and Belgrade-born fashion designer Roksanda Ilinčić who, since starting her fashion label in 2003, has dressed some of the best.

Kim Keever’s sensuous images have been called “a hydroponic Jackson Pollock”. Having studied engineering and interning at NASA, Keever who was living in the East Village – think Andy Warhol, Grandmaster Flash and subway graffiti – ditched it all for a fishtank and a camera. These sublime images are tiny instances caught on a large format camera, the captured moments as pigment hits water, dispersing in tiny sparks and swelling plumes of colours.

About this very time Roksanda Ilinčić was born, and following her mother’s obsession with Yves Saint Laurent, she found herself – after an appropriate education at Central Saint Martins – dressing the likes of Tilda Swinton, Michelle Obama and our very own Cate Blanchett. Sculptural shapes and innovative fabrics, Ilinčić’s play on the interactions of colour in blocks, in patchworks, in facets and in confettied pixelations are  truly captivating.

Credits: Kim Keever, style.com

This & That: Roksanda & Kim Keever

In/Out: Friday Musings - Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

Never one to shy from new talent and creative exploration, french fashion house Hermés has been having some fun with French Canadian creative duo Vallée Duhamel in this little animation – ‘Hermès Métamorphose’.

With a super youthful pop, Hermès accessories and scarves are bought to life in this playful folly. Accompanied by a lively little ditty this one minute clip leaves you grinning from ear to ear.’

Credits: Vallée Duhamel

FRIDAY MUSINGS – Hermès Métamorphose

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Miles away from her day job as one half of Vena Cava – a super sassy ready to wear American fashion label – designer Sophie Buhai recently enjoyed a decorative dream residency at Villa Lena in Tuscany, fabricating stylishly serene objects with an architectural presence. A strong bond to the body they adorn, Buhai’s pieces are refined and confident ornaments in muted golds, ivory and black.

Captured on site at Villa Lena by the very talented photographer Frederik Vercruysse, the images radiate an almost Nordic sense of tranquility. Not surprisingly Sophie Buhai explained her time at Villa Lena as “Paradise!”, a place one can go to create in a society that still celebrates the daily basics of life. It is why perhaps, the materials she chose for her jewels – bronze, marble, bone and wood – have such honest hardworking qualities.

The Villa Lena hotel houses an artist residency where multidisciplinary creative talent can work for a period of two months, collaborate with other residents, mingle with hotel guests and take part in villa’s daily life, food and culture. More on the Villa Lena soon.

Credits: Frederik Vercruysse

Sophie Buhai at Villa Lena

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