DADU SHIN ‘I DON’T LIKE CLOTHES’

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

New York illustrator Dadu Shin’s personal project ‘I don’t like clothes’ is a series of whimsical drawings assembled from visual reference, fashion and folly.

‘I don’t like clothes’ came about when the volume of Shin’s editorial workload drove him to find an expressive release without a brief. Shin’s figures are mute, their clothes owning the person and dictating their identity; the street girl in Converse high tops and an army bomber jacket, the glam diva in a full-length golden gown, the black and white checked muse, the Lagerfeld-inspired zigzag, the kimono-ed geisha, the psychedelic guru, all relishing in their timelessness.

Like most illustrators Shin is a constant doodler, his nimble fingers racing to keep time with the creative pace of his work. Early in his vocation he’d tried to pigeon hole his style, but he found instead this quashed his creative expression. Working with mediums from pencil through to ink, paint and gouache, his drawings are diverse in character and meaning. Embracing his eclectic flair has ensured that his work is now found everywhere from Harper’s Bazaar to the New Yorker.

Credits: Dadu Shin

ALANA WILSON ‘COLLECTION II’

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

Sydney-based ceramicist Alana Wilson’s new collection II has a tiptoeing poise and a sense of lightness evocative of Degas’s ballet dancers. With a dancer’s sense of graceful composure and movement, their feminine forms hover high on fine bases, their sweeping tops generously flared.

Delicately poetic, they have a preciousness that only comes from something so tenderly crafted. Wilson uses a slip cast technique to ensure multiples of one form. She then applies layers of stoneware glaze, creating imperfect surfaces of warm milky whites and metallic dense blacks and bronzes so that each piece has completely unique.

The captured images of Wilson’s work, styled and shot by floral artist Simone Gooch of Fjura, echoes Wilson’s other inspiration; Ikebana, where the two elements – vessel and flora – unite humanity and nature. Wilson’s vessels are an integral partner to the blooms, open throated they sing for their host.

Wilson’s work is exceptional, her love for the contextual, intertwined with her quest for experimental contemporary glazing techniques, ensures that the result is something that is so very captivating and mesmerisingly ethereal.

Credits: Ceramics & Creative Direction by Alana Wilson, Photography, Styling & Florals by Simone Gooch

THIS & THAT: ELLERY PRE-FALL ’15 & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

In/Out- THIS & THAT: ELLERY & TREVOR MEIN

Australian creatives fashion designer Kym Ellery, and photographer Trevor Mein, come powerfully together in this ‘This & That’. Daring and defiant, their art forms are visually arresting; an atmospheric envelopment, one rebelliously tailored, the other wild and vast.

Voluminous, tonal forms of strength and fluidity, Ellery’s funnelled bell silhouettes and colossal dress coats are in sync with the engulfing presence of Mein’s cloudscapes, which tempestuously swirl above us on the eve of winter.

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist Trevor Mein via Otomys Gallery and Ellery

OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones ‘Still Life’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

Sydney artist Laura Jones‘Still Life’ paintings are a celebratory expression of life. It’s not just the subject matter that embodies this, but also the artist’s emotional interpretation in which she invites us to share with her the captivating joys around us all.

Jones’ bright blooms, bountiful foliage and exotic fruits burst forth with youthful vigor from their canvases. Rich in pattern and colour and styled with casual grace, they are free-spirited bouquets that uplift the soul. Gifts from the earth; dragon fruits, pineapples, orchids and gum blossoms, are offerings from Mother Nature at her best. The seasonal joy of Jones’ handpicked harvest of flowers is bighearted, abundantly festive yet at other times beautifully solitary. The backdrops are extensions of the bountiful sentiment; patch-worked colours, abstractions of space, or dense inky black, opening up or condensing our focus.

Working with hand-picked flowers, Jones’s time is limited to their lifespan, their detail depicted broadly so that all that remains is the true essence of their spirit. Her subject matter is ageless but her lashings of confident brushstrokes are completely contemporary.

As it is we are not alone in our admiration, this exhibition is a retrospective of Jones’ work since 2012. Laura Jones appetite for life is contagious, inviting us to capture the moment, to celebrate and to share its joys.

We have cherished Jones’ vivacity since interviewing her for a ‘Chat in a Chair’ back in 2013.

Laura Jones ‘Still Life’
Hawkesbury Regional Gallery
Deerubbin Centre
300 George St
Windsor, NSW
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 10-4
Saturday, Sunday: 10-3
Until 24th May 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artist Laura Jones and Hawkesbury Regional Gallery

HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The Hotel Covell in Los Feliz, the epicentre of Los Angeles’ east-side hipster scene, has been called a modern day descendant of the Chateau Marmont, born with old soul. Set within a 1930s building over bar owner and entrepreneur Dustin Lancaster’s Bar Covell and designed by Sally Breer of Co-Mingle, the five-room hotel is a snapshot of five chapters in the life of a fictional bon-vivant writer character named ‘George Covell’. Loosely shaped by the collective stories of Lancaster & Breer’s own lives, Covell’s fictional tale is narrated from room to room starting in his hometown Oklahoma journeying to New York, with a brief sojourn to Paris and to his adventures beyond.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter One, called the ‘Oklahoma Room’, imagines George Covell’s rustic and earthy hometown and is inspired by the Mid-West with its humble sense of comfort, recycled timber and aged leather.

Chapter Two, the ‘1950s NYC Flat’, takes us to Covell’s new found world of industrial and functional rigour. Modernist design inspirations (the design of Room 02 is so very Charlotte Perriand) share the stage with iconic midcentury design classics by the likes of Charles and Ray Eames.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter 3, ‘A Parisian Atelier’ imagines the lodging of Covell’s girlfriend with soft textures and a bohemian feminine sensibility. A blush pink Eileen Gray Bibendum chair alludes to the romance of Covell’s 1970s Parisian dalliance.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The richly layered, palette of Chapter Four ‘Supreme’, finds our character George Covell adding to his collection with travels far and wide to Monaco and India.

His story, concludes with Chapter Five ‘The Heir’, envisaging the apartment Covell’s Paris-raised daughter inhabits, surrounded by her father’s life-long collection of treasures, back in New York city in the late 1970s and ‘80s.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Credits: Sally Breer & Hotel Covell

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