Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

Gotta love another Online Find. Today’s is from Iacoli & McAllister, a stylistically refined and materially rigourous range of furniture, jewellery, lighting and small objects. Their craft is about beauty, quality and style and all of their work is responsibly produced in the United States. They describe there process as “one part exploration, one part learning curve, one part affection, one part sheer strife, and one part caffeine”.

We think their work speaks for it’s self and what they believe needs a moment to sparkle. Here it is, word for word. Read, look and listen up.

WE BELIEVE:

This is simultaneously the most difficult and the best thing we’ve ever set out to accomplish.

We compliment each other, most of the time.

Convention is boring.

Therapy and a cigarette will cure most anything.

Being a weekday vegan rules.

Eight weeks of vacation a year is a good place to start.

The truth always happens.

In all likelihood, you are a lovely human.

Our parents love us.

Credits: Iacoli & McAllister

CHAT IN A CHAIR: DOCTOR LISA COOPER

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

What a treat to introduce Sydney artist Lisa Cooper of DOCTOR COOPER STUDIO. With that alabaster skin, untamable jet black hair and intricate floral tattoo she embodies the still lives she so intuitively constructs. If you’ve ever had the luck of meeting Dr Cooper you would recognise that mischievous twinkle in her eye always present in truly gifted individuals.

With a Doctorate of Philosophy in Fine Arts she explains her studio work “as embodying human emotion thru art practice” using flowers “the greatest medium for human emotion”.

Cooper’s work is commission-based, whether it’s a floral expression for an individual, crowns for the Sydney Theatre Company or golden wreaths for Tiffany & Co. She is inspiring with her sense of social inclusiveness and is not only open to diverse briefs but excited by the challenge of left fieldness. Subscribing to her depth of soulful beauty you could approach her with any brief and she would return it with a considered, grand, yet fleeting floral testimonial.

We always feel uplifted when we see her van around knowing that we in Sydney have someone special in the fold that understands the need for personal human expression. It is a well-known fact that Dr Cooper brings such a sense of intimate joy to all that have the pleasure of working with her.

It’s no surprise then that her chair of choice is a sentimental one that has seen her through this incredible journey. A 1940’s sturdy timber chair with robust blood red upholstery and with a strong sense of history and comfort for Cooper. It’s where she sits in her St Peters studio every day conjuring up the stuff of our dreams.

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

Tell us about your chair? What it it’s story?
I’ve had this chair for about 15 years. It was given to me by another student at The College of Fine Arts, he was apparently ‘upgrading’ to another chair and as I had expressed affection for his chair he offered it to me. That was second year of undergrad. I have had it as my work/studio chair ever since, I’m very attached to it and intend to have it all the days of my life, god willing. I have developed all of my projects and made much of my work with its physical support. It is comfortable and ergonomic in ways that are particular to its era which I would put around 1940?

Biggest glory-moment career-wise?
My book deal. My van. The signage on my van. The first flower order from someone i didn’t know. Tiffany and Co. commission. First job for the Sydney Theatre Company. First funeral. At christmas my van was parked in Bowral and someone left a note on the windscreen that they like my work. My business card. Art Month. The MCA. Toni Maticevski. The phone call in tears because she loved the flowers so much. The ones who say they remind them of their nanna. They’re all equal.

The Doctor thing… Tell us about it.
I have a PhD in Art: ‘A Metaphysics of the Annihilation of Self in Video-Portraiture (Imaging mediations between the Human and Divine)’ – a document that speaks both of my art practice and the work that I have continued to produce with flowers as my medium. I worked very hard to achieve this degree and so the word doctor figured in naming my flower work: DOCTOR COOPER STUDIO the inclusion of my title both honours my work as an artist and academic and positions my flower work outside of the usual ‘floral’ names given to flower businesses which is useful in conveying my distinction.

Why flowers?
They are the most captivating and effective medium I have found for the expression of human emotion, which has always been the central tenant of my work.

Blundstones or RM’s?
Blundstones for work. RM’s for going out.

What gift do you give to a florist?
Bath salts, a crystal or one of Elise Pioch’s candles. Hermes.

Describe your ideal studio soundtrack
ABC FM (except when the crazy jazz comes on, I can’t abide the crazy jazz – then silence)

What is the most treasured tool of your trade?
My gold secateurs and my printer (which is why I employed my assistant Sophie, she knows how to work the printer – she’s very good)

If you could holiday for a year straight where would you go?
Marseille

What I know about people who give flowers is…
That they shall inherit the earth (the good souls).

Credits:
Photography by: Ben Pyke

OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

Iconic architecture makes your heart sing in a way like no other. No one forgets those treasured moments spent in buildings and spaces all around the world that enliven the senses, that move and inspire us to travel more, read, eat, dance and take a moment to just take it all in and breath.

In writing a list of places to visit in a lifetime, Fallingwater by Frank Lloyd Wright could be singled out as potentially the most iconic house. Over Christmas, our designer Dominique visited the house for an in-depth tour (which allowed photos to be taken inside the house!) and today we bring to you a small snippet of her own treasured goose-bumpy moments at Fallingwater.

Fallingwater is a house like no other, built over a waterfall in Bear Run in southwest Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands. Commissioned by the Kaufmann family from Pittsburgh, the house was built between 1936 and 1939 and was owned and used by the Kaufmann family until 1963, when it was entrusted by Edgar Kaufmann, jr., to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. To date (despite conservation works), everything inside the house remains as it was in 1963 despite receiving over 4.5 million visitors.

What perhaps is most enchanting about this house is its synonymous relationship with the environment in which it is found. Despite its assertively modern conception by Wright, it is so beautifully executed as the icon of Wright’s principles of ‘organic architecture’. The landscape of the whole Laurel Highlands is reflected, is celebrated in the house – the sinuous raw winter branches, the buttery yellow of the wheat fields, the orange of the leaves in the fall, the charcoal grey of the rolling hills late afternoon, the intense snowfalls and the long hot summers. It’s raw and it’s rugged, it’s pitching a tent in a storm, it’s seeking shade on a dangerously hot day – it’s the unmistakable sense of adventure that makes this house so truly unforgettable.

The colour palette is that of the landscape injected with the modernism of Wright’s signature Cherokee red for the steel work. Brass window hardware glints in the sun like the stream which runs underneath the building. The spines of locally quarried stacked stone are built as a stylised replication of the striations of the large natural rock shelves behind the house. The bathrooms and bedrooms are modest in scale and decoration yet meticulously detailed for moments of sheer joy such as a half arc cut out in a timber desk which allows a window to swing open (see below), to fireplaces seemingly organically carved up and out of the slate floor as if it was found that way.

It is only natural that we find ourselves captivated by the interiors of the house. Everything from the materials, to the custom designed built-in joinery (Wright’s method for mitigating a furniture fit out by his clients!) to the paint colours create a unified, rigourously yet entirely organic composition.

To our modern standards there is such austerity to the interior at face value yet in the space every single detail, every texture, every material feels so harmonious to the greater context of the building and the landscape. It is one big harmonious symphony of beauty, inspiration and delight and well worth the 3 days out of New York City to get lost in Wright’s masterpiece.

Credits: Photography by Dominique Brammah

Anna Kovecses: øyenvitne

In/Out - Anna Kovecses

In/Out - Anna Kovecses

In/Out - Anna Kovecses

In/Out - Anna Kovecses

In/Out - Anna Kovecses

Its always refreshing to see something so pure where the balance of colour and composition nestle like perfect bedfellows!

Anna Kovecses has really hit the nail on the head with these books covers for Norwegian publishing house øyenvitne (Norwegian for ‘eyewitness’). Her brief included logo mark, visual identity and covers for four crime novels by young Scandinavian authors.

Two dimensional yet collaged, their naive beauty reminds us of the painterly yet geometric compositions of Matisse and the hand-cut quality of Jean Arp and our own Kirra Jamison with a David Hockney pool series colour palette. The juxtaposition of their stylised bright covers to their content make them all the more appealing.

Anna Kovecses lives on the seaside in Cyprus with her boyfriend and small daughter creating delightful graphics with just the right dose of nostalgia – sounds idyllic doesn’t it!

Credits: Anna Kovecses

Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

In/Out - Julia Schauenburg: 52 bunches of flowers I bought myself

52 Bunches of Flowers I Bought Myself‘ by Julia Schauenburg is a study of flowers in various stages of decay. It illustrates a year of contemplation about the social connection we have with flowers, romance and relationships. Schauenburg originally from Hamburg who lived in Sydney and now lives in Berlin, explores the grief of lost love, romance and gesture, documenting the point in time when romance becomes nostalgia. This series was exhibited at Damien Minton Gallery in 2010.

The flowers seen in mid-life or at the end of their decorative purpose as a still life photograph are serenely mesmerising. Although melancholy their soft palette and poise are whimsical in both a heartwarming and a heartbreaking way. And with the next Chat in a Chair on the way there is no time like the present to celebrate the vulnerability and the beauty of flowers.

Credits: Julia Schauenburg

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