Chiaozza ‘A-Frame’

In/Out: Chiaozza

In/Out: Chiaozza

In/Out: Chiaozza

In/Out: Chiaozza

In/Out: Chiaozza

In/Out: Chiaozza

In/Out: Chiaozza

In/Out: Chiaozza

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Chiaozza’s graphic sculptures leap off the wall like a joyful musical score. Brooklynites Adam Frezza and Terri Chiao are clearly having a good time creating their own cryptograms.

Their luminous symbols are studies in composition. Intersecting lines, tensioned curves and parallel planes are vibrant, their electric shadows so buoyant that they engage the walls in their optimistic melody.

Poetic pop, jubilantly confident and youthful, the strong linear parameters are coaxed into a futuristic font that is universally exhilarating.

Credits: Chiaozza

Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

In/Out: Ulla Johnson Spring 2016

Ulla Johnson’s Spring 2016 collection is modern and whimsical, calling on the 1970s yet current and unique to the Manhattan-born designer. With its flowing, natural fabrics and delicate detailing, sometimes incorporating structure but mostly relaxed, the collection is ultra calm and perfect for spring.

As well as the careful choice of material, it is colour that adds to the gentle tone of the range. Between soft rusts and deep navy, rosy pinks and dusty pinks, mustard yellow and plenty of classic white, it’s a colour palette that evokes images of sun and soft grass, the sea and the Californian desert. The denim inviting, Johnson choosing to go for a paler hue, a faded almost baby blue.

Along with being a coherent range as a whole – in its effortlessly dreamy tone, Ulla Johnson’s Spring is one in which each garment has its own unique touch. From the long dresses that echo those in the much-referenced ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ with their delicate embroidery, to the wide-legged flares with belt ties, pinafore dresses with ruffled straps and jumpsuits with piping, each piece is imbued with detail that gives it a sense of difference. It’s a beautiful collection. Peaceful, inviting, and clearly made for the wearer.

Credits: Ulla Johnson

A SPECIAL TIME OF YEAR

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At this special time of year, some birds of a feather flock together, while other fine species take flight wherever.

No matter how you celebrate the festive season, we would like to thank you for your support this past year and wish you the very best for a happy & healthy 2016.

Credits: Artwork by Marc Martin for Arent&Pyke

Doug Johnston ‘What it is’

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What It Is'

 

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What it is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What it is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What it is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What it is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What it is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What it is'

In/Out: Doug Johnston 'What it is'

Doug Johnston’s rope coiled sculptures are like behavioral studies of the hand as if left to its own devices. It is no surprise that his practice evolved out of a need for release from the stress of living and working in the Big Apple. Forms scribbled on paper on the subway, tactile cotton rope found in a hardware store and a fascination with the rhythm of stitches – all are great hobbies for idle hands.

His latest show ‘What it is’ at Patrick Parrish Gallery is a collection of fluid forms, some precise and symmetrical while others are animated, all bound together by their organic personalities and eager dispositions. Made from coiling rope and stitching it with a machine, a secondary painted surface is then applied highlighting or masking the construction. Although familiar in form their use and meaning is lovingly ambiguous, instead of being led you’re asked which one nestles into your soul.

Johnston started out as an architect, moved to NYC, lost his job through the layoffs of the GFC, and so out of a need for creation found his place in the arts. His pieces are unique beacons of where your life might take you if you follow your instinct and trust your hands.

Doug Johnston ‘What it is’
Patrick Parrish Gallery
50 Lispenard Street
New York, New York 10013
05 December – 23 December 2016

Credits: Courtesy of the artist & Patrick Parrish Gallery

ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

In/Out: ANEKKA

Understated, functional and quite simply beautiful. This is ANEKKA, a relatively new yet highly sophisticated designer homewares label headed by multi-disciplinary artist Evi O who – thankfully – decided to follow a ‘natural’ urge to progress her “creative pursuit and curiosity into some kind of object form”.

After working most recently in illustration and design at Penguin Books, having a Visual Communications degree behind her, Evi chose to try her hand at homewares, coming up with the idea of ANEKKA with three best friends over a ‘happy lunch’. As well as being drawn to the idea of adding “some niceness to peoples’ homes,” it’s “the endless creative challenges in homewares design that completely” lures her in.

Attracted to minimal design – “something that looks like it can be done in 5-minutes, while in reality it’s hours and hours of perfecting”, quality products that last, and items that are highly functional, Evi has her set of challenges and opportunities cut out. And for the past year-plus, she’s been doing just that – exploring with artisans and craftsmen from all over the world “the possibilities and limitations of shape and shades”.

Working together, on what Evi calls her biggest collaboration yet, the ANEKKA team has achieved pretty well what she set out to. The line of four products, including the iconic Melk bottle/vase, available in five different shades and finishes, are all completely functional and utterly elegant – something only possible when such dedication to experimentation is involved. “I didn’t realise it before someone pointed out,” she says, “that it’s fascinating to see the messy process we went through to produce very minimal end products.”

But what else is special about ANEKKA – as well as having aesthetically appealing products that work particularly well under its name – is that it’s based on some very admirable values that Australian design can only benefit from: that every product is “well-made, functional and timeless”. With their objects designed in Australia and handcrafted in Indonesia, made from materials sourced from Japan, we’re quite confident in the longevity of the brand – which is as Evi O says at “only the beginning of a lifetime exploration in global craftsmanship and object design.” ANEKKA may be young, but it’s full of integrity and that is something to truly behold.

Credits: ANEKKA

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