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Art

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

New Yorker Landon Metz is renowned for his inky abstract shapes and watery colours with spasmodic perimeters. There is something inexplicably emotional in their free forms; sparse and disconnected, they are lyrical in graphic dialogue.

Moving away from this softness in his recent show at James Fuentes Gallery, New York, Metz’s new works are powerfully audacious. Owning the space, organic shapes in dense navy, like immersive markers, activate the room, so that the wall surfaces are the canvas.

The process of the artwork for Metz is in part about the experience, as Metz puts it “I’m really acknowledging the viewing experience as part of the creative process,……..thinking about how that idea upends the traditional roles of artist and audience.” Metz points out that although it was made in response to the space, it is site-dependent rather than specific. The work is reliant on ample white space to ground it, but although conceptualized for the gallery is not limited to it.

The shapes are familiar to Metz’s style, immediately recognisable in their character, only now he is outgrowing the confines of a traditional canvas. Part of the beauty of art is watching how the artist grows. Landon Metz is only at the beginning of a very fruitful calling – we cherish the history and look forward to all that is still to come.

Credits: Landon Metz

LANDON METZ

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

Australian artist John Bokor’s still lifes and landscapes from his exhibition, ‘Close to Home’, speak of spiritual connection to his everyday. Lounge rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, teapots, vases and bottles of Panadol are lovingly brushed onto canvas – a snapshot of contentment with living.

Cluttered and homely, his paintings are filled with objects, all bumping into one another in a friendly manner, joyously haphazard. Confident but slightly careless brushstrokes are visually intact but dreamy, creating a fuzziness of movement like a shifting gaze.

Colours are over intensified, connecting with the viewer on an emotional level. Purples, oranges, royal blue and all the hues of pink permeate Bokor’s poetic vision of life. Celebrations of the mundane, Boker’s painting are far from ordinary.

John Bokor ‘Close to Home’
King Street Gallery
177 William Street
Darlinghurst 2010 NSW
Tuesday – Saturday: 10-6
Until 2nd May 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and King Street Gallery

Out/About: John Bokor ‘Close to Home’

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

LA based ceramicist Ben Medansky‘s clay creations are functional objet d’art. Crude beauties, their rudimentary shapes in raw materials and humorous poses, are thoughtful in scale and composition.

Speckled buff clay underlies all his pieces, which he describes as “groggy, sandy, clay”; it peeks through the glaze like coffee grains. It’s this honest base fabric, that somehow lends itself to the muted earthenware from the 1970’s, that in Medansky’s hands becomes modern.

Unexpected collision of forms set Medansky’s ceramics apart. Fat fins protrude from familiar shapes in ‘Vessel / Astrid’, ‘Vessel / Astra’ and ‘Filter’. While ‘Vessel / Rocco’ and ‘Vessel / Blue Pyrite’ have a magnetic character collecting blue cubes and other abstract objects and carefully tipping each end in glaze.

Although Ben Medansky seems young in years he has worked for some big names, like Memphis great Peter Shire, and contemporaries, Anthony Pearson and the Haas Brothers.

Credits: Ben Medansky

BEN MEDANSKY

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

‘Sunday Walks’ painted by New Yorker Leanne Shapton are intimate meanders through forested trails. Vibrant colours, intersecting planes and obscured vistas depict one of the most relaxing weekend pastimes.

Serene and contemplative, light reflects and shadows fall. Naive in their application they are emotive of the last day of the week; a day of subdued reflection. Blushy afternoons, dusty dusk, grey wintersolace, autumnal hues and vibrant summer foliage all participate in this meditative collection.

Appearing in The New York Times on the last week of each month, Shapton’s series have been featured on In/Out twice before. Our delight continues.

Characteristically free-styled and spirited Leanne Shapton also works on J&L Books a non-profit publishing house that produces small runs of books by or about contemporary artists.

Credits: NY Times

‘SUNDAY WALKS’ LEANNE SHAPTON

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

“Creating something is more like letting go than thinking,” says Sydney-based artist Ann Thomson. Celebrated for her intuitive expressive brushstrokes and superb colour combinations, Thomson’s new collection of ‘Variations’ reads like a visual diary, a perfect companion to the Sartorialist’s relaxed but sophisticated street style.

Free and brave big washes of soft tones are punctuated by distinct markings and bursts of intense colour. Bottle green, ochre, deep plums, royal blue, siren red, apricot, dusty blues, desert orange, blushing pink, deep green, warm browns all frolic together.

Rejoice in autumnal colours as the weather starts to cool and enjoy the last days of ‘Variations’ at Olsen Irwin Gallery.

Ann Thomson ‘Variations’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday: 12-5
Tuesday-Friday: 10-6
Saturday: 10-5
Sunday: 12-5
Until 14th March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Olsen Irwin GalleryThe Sartorialist

THIS & THAT: Ann Thomson

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

Arthouse Gallery’s ‘In The Still’ groupshow explores the idea of the still life through the eyes of twelve contemporary Australian artists. Diverse in materiality and application, from large scale floral single blooms to 3D compositions, the essence of the everyday or the moment, is always present.

Craig Waddell’s intimate paintings of tactile blooms are almost scientific in their botanist dialogue. Miranda Skoczek‘s vivid colourscapes ground and isolate one object while others ghost in the background, part dreamscape, part consciousness. Laura Jones‘ paintings are more traditional yet informal and celebratory with their lurid textiles, bright blooms and festive fodder. Leah Fraser’s condensed imagery is fanciful, a collision of flora and fauna, decoratively wild and free. Kirra Jamison’s floral impressions are visual imprints, like firecrackers when you close your eyes. Claudia Damichi’s ikebana-inspired portrait is laced with symbols like a graphic equation to the organic structure. While Heidi Yardley’s split-natured compositions from yesteryear, smudged and soft, are reminiscent of black and white photos of 1950’s Hollywood beauties.

‘In The Still’ is a collection of bountiful jaunty combinations of the actual versus the abstract.

‘In the Still’ Group Show
Arthouse Gallery
66 McLachlan Avenue
Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011
Tuesday – Friday: 9.30am – 6.00pm
Saturday 10.00am: 5.00pm
Sunday – Monday: Closed
Until 21st March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Arthouse Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: ‘IN THE STILL’ GROUP SHOW

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

Felix Forest’s ‘Chernobyl’ is a haunting realisation of Forest’s teenage dream to visit the eroded, decayed city; built, then abandoned after the world’s worst nuclear disaster. Shot last May after a last minute opportunity arose when Forest was working in Paris, his visit was as fragile as the political situation at the time, the Ukrainian war raging on and Kiev literally up in flames.

The clarity with which Forest’s experience of ‘Chernobyl’ is documented, the delicately balanced compositions and the sense of order in the symmetry imbues the devastation with an unexpected calm. The perspective of Forest’s work is vast yet intimate, dramatic yet serene, a poetic balance when all images are viewed together. The intimacy of the almost domestic scale crops, where one feels that someone has just left the room, is complemented with the comprehension of the almost 30 year abandonment in the broader perspectives of the public spaces. There is a crisp reality, a heartbreakingly beautiful tactility, yet there is a sense of composure to the abandonment. Vivid greenery creeps in, a peripheral acknowledgment of hope. The palette of tranquil mossy greens with harsh slaps of red highlight the dichotomy of emotional experience.

Forest says, “My focus was always on taking photograph in the exclusion zones and I was so focused before I got there that I forgot about the experience side of the journey. It soon caught up with me. On our way to Chernobyl, there were a lot of militias and military road blockages and as soon as we arrived a thunderstorm started… The ambiance was so dramatic and infectious, I was the only ‘tourist’ in the zone as the political climate wouldn’t have been appealing to most people. My guide (you have to get permits through the Chernobyl agency to go there and are constantly escorted by a guide and watched by militaries) has been working in Chernobyl for 14 years, first as a worker and then as a guide. His knowledge of the zone was very extensive and we had planned our expedition as precisely as possible to minimise my exposure to radiation.”

The emotional weight of Forest’s ‘Chernobyl’ is hard to take, yet the experience of such delicate, considered beauty in the abandonment resonates deep within.

Felix Forest ‘Chernobyl’
Becker Minty
Shop 7, 81 Macleay Street
Potts Point NSW
Open 7 days 10:30am – 6pm

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Becker Minty

OUT/ABOUT: FELIX FOREST ‘CHERNOBYL’

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

Australian artist Kate Robertson’s anthropologic studies are visually captivating, abstract maps. Ironically, they resemble scientific microscopic investigations in their repetition and scale.

Robertson immerses herself within a community, “working in the ‘between space’ of contemporary art and ethnography”. Gathering physical organic matter such as leaves and dirt, she using photographic techniques to create these delicate cosmic contact prints.

Credits: Kate Roberston

KATE ROBERTSON

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

For German-born New-York based Alex Proba, ‘A Poster A Day’ project, is a daily exercise. An impulsive personal visual journal in poster format, her theme although abstract to most is clear as written word to her.

Currently working as the Art Director for Kickstarter, Alex found herself at a loss one day, and instead of her usual escapades into inspiration she started graphically doodling. Realising how much she was enjoying the process of creating freely, with no preconceived thought pattern, she decided to dedicate 30 minutes a day to expressing her instinctual intellect through collaging. As Proba puts it “there are many days when abstraction guides my design, and for some it may be hard to imagine what my day looked liked based on purely graphical posters. But for me, it’s the alignment of occurrences that make me explore symmetry, geometric shapes, and patterns.…….. Previously, I wasn’t even able to remember what I ate the day before. The posters restore my past, and that’s magical and beautiful.”

Having exhibited her first year at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg, New York, she is now looking forward to the next year of ‘Yours-A Poster A Day’. Shifting attention from herself to other peoples stories Alex is calling for submissions to interpret into her astute graphic dialect in 2015.

Credits: Studio Proba

ALEX PROBA ‘A POSTER A DAY’

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

We are very excited to bring you the first This&That for 2015! In this dreamy This&That American sisters Laura Naples and Kristen Giorgi – from NG Collective – and Korean photographer Kyung Soo Kim, court each other with bountiful colours in warm hues. Both layered and voluminous the soft palette is punctuated with inky black forms.

Kyung Soo Kim’s ‘Full Moon Story’ takes a fresh look at the ‘Hanbok’ (traditional Korean festival costume), provocative and intimate the subject seemingly unaware of the lens. Volumes of fabric in mauve, dusty pink, sage, light mustard and cream are gathered revealing petticoats and ruby red slippers. These static, cinematic, otherworldly princesses are hauntingly beautiful against such stark backgrounds.

NG Collective paintings are an ongoing narrative between two sisters. Abstract to the outsider, but filled with movement and colour, they are the dynamic representations of a family language.

Tradition flirts with the abstract, like the inner thoughts of Kyung Soo Kim’s subjects are laid bare in NG Collective’s paintings. Serene and reflective it’s a poignant match.

Credits: Kyung Soo KimNG Collective Studio

THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE STUDIO

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