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Art

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

Arthouse Gallery’s ‘In The Still’ groupshow explores the idea of the still life through the eyes of twelve contemporary Australian artists. Diverse in materiality and application, from large scale floral single blooms to 3D compositions, the essence of the everyday or the moment, is always present.

Craig Waddell’s intimate paintings of tactile blooms are almost scientific in their botanist dialogue. Miranda Skoczek‘s vivid colourscapes ground and isolate one object while others ghost in the background, part dreamscape, part consciousness. Laura Jones‘ paintings are more traditional yet informal and celebratory with their lurid textiles, bright blooms and festive fodder. Leah Fraser’s condensed imagery is fanciful, a collision of flora and fauna, decoratively wild and free. Kirra Jamison’s floral impressions are visual imprints, like firecrackers when you close your eyes. Claudia Damichi’s ikebana-inspired portrait is laced with symbols like a graphic equation to the organic structure. While Heidi Yardley’s split-natured compositions from yesteryear, smudged and soft, are reminiscent of black and white photos of 1950’s Hollywood beauties.

‘In The Still’ is a collection of bountiful jaunty combinations of the actual versus the abstract.

‘In the Still’ Group Show
Arthouse Gallery
66 McLachlan Avenue
Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011
Tuesday – Friday: 9.30am – 6.00pm
Saturday 10.00am: 5.00pm
Sunday – Monday: Closed
Until 21st March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Arthouse Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: ‘IN THE STILL’ GROUP SHOW

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

Felix Forest’s ‘Chernobyl’ is a haunting realisation of Forest’s teenage dream to visit the eroded, decayed city; built, then abandoned after the world’s worst nuclear disaster. Shot last May after a last minute opportunity arose when Forest was working in Paris, his visit was as fragile as the political situation at the time, the Ukrainian war raging on and Kiev literally up in flames.

The clarity with which Forest’s experience of ‘Chernobyl’ is documented, the delicately balanced compositions and the sense of order in the symmetry imbues the devastation with an unexpected calm. The perspective of Forest’s work is vast yet intimate, dramatic yet serene, a poetic balance when all images are viewed together. The intimacy of the almost domestic scale crops, where one feels that someone has just left the room, is complemented with the comprehension of the almost 30 year abandonment in the broader perspectives of the public spaces. There is a crisp reality, a heartbreakingly beautiful tactility, yet there is a sense of composure to the abandonment. Vivid greenery creeps in, a peripheral acknowledgment of hope. The palette of tranquil mossy greens with harsh slaps of red highlight the dichotomy of emotional experience.

Forest says, “My focus was always on taking photograph in the exclusion zones and I was so focused before I got there that I forgot about the experience side of the journey. It soon caught up with me. On our way to Chernobyl, there were a lot of militias and military road blockages and as soon as we arrived a thunderstorm started… The ambiance was so dramatic and infectious, I was the only ‘tourist’ in the zone as the political climate wouldn’t have been appealing to most people. My guide (you have to get permits through the Chernobyl agency to go there and are constantly escorted by a guide and watched by militaries) has been working in Chernobyl for 14 years, first as a worker and then as a guide. His knowledge of the zone was very extensive and we had planned our expedition as precisely as possible to minimise my exposure to radiation.”

The emotional weight of Forest’s ‘Chernobyl’ is hard to take, yet the experience of such delicate, considered beauty in the abandonment resonates deep within.

Felix Forest ‘Chernobyl’
Becker Minty
Shop 7, 81 Macleay Street
Potts Point NSW
Open 7 days 10:30am – 6pm

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Becker Minty

OUT/ABOUT: FELIX FOREST ‘CHERNOBYL’

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

Australian artist Kate Robertson’s anthropologic studies are visually captivating, abstract maps. Ironically, they resemble scientific microscopic investigations in their repetition and scale.

Robertson immerses herself within a community, “working in the ‘between space’ of contemporary art and ethnography”. Gathering physical organic matter such as leaves and dirt, she using photographic techniques to create these delicate cosmic contact prints.

Credits: Kate Roberston

KATE ROBERTSON

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

For German-born New-York based Alex Proba, ‘A Poster A Day’ project, is a daily exercise. An impulsive personal visual journal in poster format, her theme although abstract to most is clear as written word to her.

Currently working as the Art Director for Kickstarter, Alex found herself at a loss one day, and instead of her usual escapades into inspiration she started graphically doodling. Realising how much she was enjoying the process of creating freely, with no preconceived thought pattern, she decided to dedicate 30 minutes a day to expressing her instinctual intellect through collaging. As Proba puts it “there are many days when abstraction guides my design, and for some it may be hard to imagine what my day looked liked based on purely graphical posters. But for me, it’s the alignment of occurrences that make me explore symmetry, geometric shapes, and patterns.…….. Previously, I wasn’t even able to remember what I ate the day before. The posters restore my past, and that’s magical and beautiful.”

Having exhibited her first year at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg, New York, she is now looking forward to the next year of ‘Yours-A Poster A Day’. Shifting attention from herself to other peoples stories Alex is calling for submissions to interpret into her astute graphic dialect in 2015.

Credits: Studio Proba

ALEX PROBA ‘A POSTER A DAY’

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

In/Out - THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE

We are very excited to bring you the first This&That for 2015! In this dreamy This&That American sisters Laura Naples and Kristen Giorgi – from NG Collective – and Korean photographer Kyung Soo Kim, court each other with bountiful colours in warm hues. Both layered and voluminous the soft palette is punctuated with inky black forms.

Kyung Soo Kim’s ‘Full Moon Story’ takes a fresh look at the ‘Hanbok’ (traditional Korean festival costume), provocative and intimate the subject seemingly unaware of the lens. Volumes of fabric in mauve, dusty pink, sage, light mustard and cream are gathered revealing petticoats and ruby red slippers. These static, cinematic, otherworldly princesses are hauntingly beautiful against such stark backgrounds.

NG Collective paintings are an ongoing narrative between two sisters. Abstract to the outsider, but filled with movement and colour, they are the dynamic representations of a family language.

Tradition flirts with the abstract, like the inner thoughts of Kyung Soo Kim’s subjects are laid bare in NG Collective’s paintings. Serene and reflective it’s a poignant match.

Credits: Kyung Soo KimNG Collective Studio

THIS & THAT: KYUNG SOO KIM & NG COLLECTIVE STUDIO

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

In/Out - Lisa Sorgini 'Go To Town'

Sydney based photographer Lisa Sorgini explores the serenity of forgotten places / spaces in ‘Go To Town’. Milky hues create a dreamy softness, making destitution whimsical.

Beauty can be found in the most unusual places when viewed through Sorgini’s eyes. Pale pastel pinks and dove grey roads are velvety to the eye. A little fibro shack awaits its owner patiently, its ransacked interiors now calm. Peach, sky-blue and vivid green striking against the drab walls and floors. A reminder that once there was life within this violent shell.

Wire chairs sit in conversation with a steel column; rust red frames compliment the pale hues of blue grey. A teak framed lounge chair invites its next guest with its perky psychedelic back and olive seat.

Melancholy and poetic, these snapshots have soul.

Credits: Lisa Sorgini

Lisa Sorgini ‘Go To Town’

In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

 In/Out: Roxana Azar

Philadelphian photographer Roxana Azar has a knack for collating her whimsical photographs into an emotional narrative. Recognising visual connections between the organic and the constructed, her language is like a completed puzzle.

Playing with perspective and scale there are no rules. Choreographed still lifes sit serenely next to mother nature. Highlighting and obscuring with portals in shades of blue, her style is expressive and intuitive.

Obviously esoteric by nature she lives “outside of Philadelphia, where it’s just a little greener out here” and “grew up in a house full of orchids”. Sure paints a pretty picture!

Credits: Roxan Azar

Roxana Azar

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

In/Out: Maria Jeglinksa

Polish Industrial Designer Maria Jeglinska‘s ‘Drawn Objects’ are an artistic exercise in the dialogue between the 2D and the 3D. Personifying the object through its accompanying pattern, they are robust modern day objet d’art.

Jeglinska talks about her need to continuously draw, filling pages of sketchbooks with the same form until the style of the drawing owns its vision. She compares herself to a musician, constantly practicing and exploring to create visual melodies. ‘Drawn Objects’ with their bold primary colours and saturated pinks are pure pop. Things of beauty in their minimalist crafted form, their decorative skins embellish their visual pulling power.

This is a woman on a creative trajectory. Having being awarded the IKEA foundation scholarship upon graduation she was fortunate to work with the likes of Konstantin Grcic and Galerie Kreo. She started her own practice, Office for Design & Research, in 2010, and is the co-founder of EESTT (Eastern European Study Think Tank).

Credits: Maria JeglinksaPhoto Credits: Magorzata Turczyńska for Culture

Maria Jeglinksa ‘Drawn Objects’

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In/Out: Bower NYC

In 2013 Danny Giannella and Tammer Hijazi co-founded Bower Studio, an artistic endeavour to make everyday objects into delightful forms while maintaining their purpose. The result is a playful collection ranging from paperweights to tables. Boy have they been busy!

The ‘Contour Table’, as its name suggests, is dictated by its form – each element embracing the other. Mirror or stone, inset into the walnut tops, cap their cylindrical legs. The ‘Moire Table’ fans out creating delicate patterns in its slatted top. Geometric forms dominate Bower’s ‘Shape Mirrors’ and ‘Shape Boards’ generating 3D visual effects. And who wouldn’t want a little bit of ‘Tipsy’ on their table, with their grounded brass bottoms and cheeky little pointed hats?  There is a hearty theme to Bower’s colour palette of muted apricots, mustards and sage, with bolts of blue and aqua.

These two super-likable lads are having a ball, making life fun. Humor plays an important role in their process, which comes across in their objects. So get on board, we’re sure it’s infectious!

Credits: BOWER

BOWER NYC

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Sydney based artist Robert Malherbe’s latest show ‘Gathered in Spring’ – a collection of still-life paintings – is soft and delicate in subject, and robust in delivery. Renowned for painting from life in real time, Malherbe’s hand is impulsive and confident.

Malherbe’s blooms exude life. Leaves curl and petals catch and reflect light. The minute is expressed with lush brush strokes. You can visually feel the weight of the rose’s head. Chrysanthemums, peonies and tulips are rich in colour against black backdrops, red table tops and swathes of graphic black and white striped cloth. Light refracts and bounces around and through glass vases.

Warm and full, it’s Malherbe’s tactile paint surfaces that steal you away to the very moment he painted these floral arrangements. Take some time out to stop by and smell the flowers.

‘Gathered in Spring’ also features the beautifully delicate ceramic works of Prue Venables.

Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables ‘Gathered in Spring’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road, Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday 12pm – 5pm
Tuesday – Friday 1pm – 5pm
Saturday 1pm – 5pm
Sunday 12pm – 5pm
Until 20th December 2014

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Olsen Irwin Gallery

Out/About: Robert Malherbe & Prue Venables ‘Gathered in Spring’

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