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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

Sydney artist Laura Jones‘Still Life’ paintings are a celebratory expression of life. It’s not just the subject matter that embodies this, but also the artist’s emotional interpretation in which she invites us to share with her the captivating joys around us all.

Jones’ bright blooms, bountiful foliage and exotic fruits burst forth with youthful vigor from their canvases. Rich in pattern and colour and styled with casual grace, they are free-spirited bouquets that uplift the soul. Gifts from the earth; dragon fruits, pineapples, orchids and gum blossoms, are offerings from Mother Nature at her best. The seasonal joy of Jones’ handpicked harvest of flowers is bighearted, abundantly festive yet at other times beautifully solitary. The backdrops are extensions of the bountiful sentiment; patch-worked colours, abstractions of space, or dense inky black, opening up or condensing our focus.

Working with hand-picked flowers, Jones’s time is limited to their lifespan, their detail depicted broadly so that all that remains is the true essence of their spirit. Her subject matter is ageless but her lashings of confident brushstrokes are completely contemporary.

As it is we are not alone in our admiration, this exhibition is a retrospective of Jones’ work since 2012. Laura Jones appetite for life is contagious, inviting us to capture the moment, to celebrate and to share its joys.

We have cherished Jones’ vivacity since interviewing her for a ‘Chat in a Chair’ back in 2013.

Laura Jones ‘Still Life’
Hawkesbury Regional Gallery
Deerubbin Centre
300 George St
Windsor, NSW
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 10-4
Saturday, Sunday: 10-3
Until 24th May 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artist Laura Jones and Hawkesbury Regional Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones ‘Still Life’

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

‘Tempo Polveroso’ is a new body of work by Belgian photographer Frederik Vercruysse dreamed up within the serenity of an ‘artist in residency’ program at the Villa Lena in Tuscany.

Currently in exhibition at the iconic store, restaurant, hotel space, Graanmarkt 13 in Antwerp, Vercruysse’s 16 photographs are a clouded abstraction of the quintessentially romantic ideals of the Italian countryside.

Devoid of all human presence, the very core of the italian landscape of marble is at once cinematic in it’s grandeur, yet melancholic in its reality. The ‘Tempo Polveroso’ or ‘Pulverised Time’ of Vercruysse’s capture transcends a comprehensible sense of scale, creating a unique vision of the landscape architecture of Tuscany. Eerily detached from a sense of reality and context, they are picturesque yet abstract, intimate yet monumental.

Exploring beyond the quarries and into the immediate surrounds of the Villa Lena, Vercruysse’s illusions of nature are free from context. Their detail is layered in mist and blurred or flared, infinitely poetic is a suspended dreamlike haze.

Credits: Courtesy of the Artist Frederik Vercruysse & Graanmarkt 13
With thanks to Lies Vangeel of VonYellow

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse ‘Tempo Polveroso’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

Julian Meagher in ‘Drinking with the other Sun’ and Anh Do in ‘Man’, now showing at Sydney gallery Olsen Irwin present emotional portraits of men in a raw, yet endearing way, their subjects floating in white space, in paint on canvas. Meagher’s work is ephemeral and ghostly, his subjects reverent, fragile and blurred presences while Do’s men are physically arresting, thickly layered to command space beyond the confines of the canvas.

Sydney-based artist Julian Meagher’s exhibition, ‘Drinking with the other Sun’, is a collection of ethereal paintings layered with a recurrent exploration of the male figures pivotal to the artist, his understanding of masculinity, the evolution of Australia and the legacy of our history.

Although Meagher’s medium is oil on linen, it is his combination of precise linework combined with delicately controlled leaching and dripping that mimics the character of watercolours. It’s a technique that softens the features of faces, the gnarliness of flora and gives dimensional purity to the collections of glass objects.

‘Drinking with the other Sun’ explores the Australian identity by placing male figures that are personally connected or historically known alongside the native flora of Australia and that of our imperial motherland. The history of forefathers portrayed against the hardiness of the Banksia and contrasted with the iconic English Rose (at once delicate and prickly), metaphorically referencing British influence on our national identity. The stoic depiction of Australian masculinity is portrayed by Meagre as an exploration of vulnerability.

Portraits include those of the artist’s cousin Leighton whose father was a matador in the 1960s in Seville, as well as portraits of the great great grandsons of explorers William Wentworth and William Lawson, and the grandson of Sydney Harbour Bridge engineer John Bradfield. Meagher also includes a self-portrait in his father’s shirt.

Meagher comments; “As I’ve grown older I have become much more aware of how both personal and collective inherited history shapes our identity, especially in relation to contemporary Australian masculinity.”

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

Anh Do‘s first solo exhibiton, ‘Man’, is a collection of densely painted portraits of friends of the artist, with creases and crevasses speaking of full lives touched by beauty and pain. Do, a well known comedian, actor, writer and television personality has found his solace in painting.

Complementing Meagher’s preoccupation with masculinity, Do explores the paradox of human nature, exploring that mysterious place of enlightenment behind our public facades and the emotional duality of men. As Do puts it, “I try to pick people if I think I can show the whole story in their faces… It’s very intuitive, I am just looking for those lines between the guy’s eyes or something in the mood he is giving off’.”

Rugged, deep furrows, with flyaway hair and craggy beards are decisively painted with confident brushstrokes, impasto style. Colour accentuates the intensity of Do’s masculine faces in ‘Man’ as they float on their canvases allowing for no distraction from the commanding yet almost familiar subjects.

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

Julian Meagher ‘Drinking with the other Sun’ & Anh Do ‘Man’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday: 12-5
Tuesday-Friday: 10-6
Saturday: 10-5
Sunday: 12-5
Until 10th May 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artists Julian Meagher and Anh Do and Olsen Irwin Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher ‘Drinking with the other sun’ & Anh Do ‘Man’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

Sydneysider Daniel Shipp’s photographic exhibition ‘Botanical Inquiry’ is a carefully orchestrated arrangement of almost ikebana-like plants and flowers against cinematic backdrops of our cityscapes that are full of drama. Working with vegetation sourced from the streets of Sydney, Shipp hones in to amplify the small natural wonders often overlooked in the hustle and bustle of the everyday.

Playing on scale, Shipp creates an insect-like perspective. We are made to imagine him digging himself into the ground in order to access this viewpoint. With the looming dip of a stem, plants lose their delicateness and become towering, textural structures, beautifully sinuous in form, speaking of the survival of the fittest. The built environment is hazy, solitary and haunting, yet almost insignificant against the drama of plant life, a reminder of the true order of things.

‘Botanical Inquiry’ is fuelled by Shipp’s relentless curiosity of the interaction with and simultaneous existence of the built and the natural environments.

Daniel Shipp ‘Botanical Inquiry’
Saint Cloche Gallery
37 Macdonald Street
Paddington NSW
Monday – Friday: 8am – 4pm
Saturday – Sunday: 8am – 5pm
Until May 3rd

Credits: Courtesy of the Artist & Saint Cloche Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: DANIEL SHIPP ‘BOTANICAL INQUIRY’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Landon Metz - James Fuentes

New Yorker Landon Metz is renowned for his inky abstract shapes and watery colours with spasmodic perimeters. There is something inexplicably emotional in their free forms; sparse and disconnected, they are lyrical in graphic dialogue.

Moving away from this softness in his recent show at James Fuentes Gallery, New York, Metz’s new works are powerfully audacious. Owning the space, organic shapes in dense navy, like immersive markers, activate the room, so that the wall surfaces are the canvas.

The process of the artwork for Metz is in part about the experience, as Metz puts it “I’m really acknowledging the viewing experience as part of the creative process,……..thinking about how that idea upends the traditional roles of artist and audience.” Metz points out that although it was made in response to the space, it is site-dependent rather than specific. The work is reliant on ample white space to ground it, but although conceptualized for the gallery is not limited to it.

The shapes are familiar to Metz’s style, immediately recognisable in their character, only now he is outgrowing the confines of a traditional canvas. Part of the beauty of art is watching how the artist grows. Landon Metz is only at the beginning of a very fruitful calling – we cherish the history and look forward to all that is still to come.

Credits: Landon Metz

LANDON METZ

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

Australian artist John Bokor’s still lifes and landscapes from his exhibition, ‘Close to Home’, speak of spiritual connection to his everyday. Lounge rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, teapots, vases and bottles of Panadol are lovingly brushed onto canvas – a snapshot of contentment with living.

Cluttered and homely, his paintings are filled with objects, all bumping into one another in a friendly manner, joyously haphazard. Confident but slightly careless brushstrokes are visually intact but dreamy, creating a fuzziness of movement like a shifting gaze.

Colours are over intensified, connecting with the viewer on an emotional level. Purples, oranges, royal blue and all the hues of pink permeate Bokor’s poetic vision of life. Celebrations of the mundane, Boker’s painting are far from ordinary.

John Bokor ‘Close to Home’
King Street Gallery
177 William Street
Darlinghurst 2010 NSW
Tuesday – Saturday: 10-6
Until 2nd May 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and King Street Gallery

Out/About: John Bokor ‘Close to Home’

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

In/Out: Ben Medansky Ceramics

LA based ceramicist Ben Medansky‘s clay creations are functional objet d’art. Crude beauties, their rudimentary shapes in raw materials and humorous poses, are thoughtful in scale and composition.

Speckled buff clay underlies all his pieces, which he describes as “groggy, sandy, clay”; it peeks through the glaze like coffee grains. It’s this honest base fabric, that somehow lends itself to the muted earthenware from the 1970’s, that in Medansky’s hands becomes modern.

Unexpected collision of forms set Medansky’s ceramics apart. Fat fins protrude from familiar shapes in ‘Vessel / Astrid’, ‘Vessel / Astra’ and ‘Filter’. While ‘Vessel / Rocco’ and ‘Vessel / Blue Pyrite’ have a magnetic character collecting blue cubes and other abstract objects and carefully tipping each end in glaze.

Although Ben Medansky seems young in years he has worked for some big names, like Memphis great Peter Shire, and contemporaries, Anthony Pearson and the Haas Brothers.

Credits: Ben Medansky

BEN MEDANSKY

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Sunday Walks'  Leanne Shapton

‘Sunday Walks’ painted by New Yorker Leanne Shapton are intimate meanders through forested trails. Vibrant colours, intersecting planes and obscured vistas depict one of the most relaxing weekend pastimes.

Serene and contemplative, light reflects and shadows fall. Naive in their application they are emotive of the last day of the week; a day of subdued reflection. Blushy afternoons, dusty dusk, grey wintersolace, autumnal hues and vibrant summer foliage all participate in this meditative collection.

Appearing in The New York Times on the last week of each month, Shapton’s series have been featured on In/Out twice before. Our delight continues.

Characteristically free-styled and spirited Leanne Shapton also works on J&L Books a non-profit publishing house that produces small runs of books by or about contemporary artists.

Credits: NY Times

‘SUNDAY WALKS’ LEANNE SHAPTON

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

In/Out - THIS&THAT: Anne Thompson & The Satorialist

“Creating something is more like letting go than thinking,” says Sydney-based artist Ann Thomson. Celebrated for her intuitive expressive brushstrokes and superb colour combinations, Thomson’s new collection of ‘Variations’ reads like a visual diary, a perfect companion to the Sartorialist’s relaxed but sophisticated street style.

Free and brave big washes of soft tones are punctuated by distinct markings and bursts of intense colour. Bottle green, ochre, deep plums, royal blue, siren red, apricot, dusty blues, desert orange, blushing pink, deep green, warm browns all frolic together.

Rejoice in autumnal colours as the weather starts to cool and enjoy the last days of ‘Variations’ at Olsen Irwin Gallery.

Ann Thomson ‘Variations’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday: 12-5
Tuesday-Friday: 10-6
Saturday: 10-5
Sunday: 12-5
Until 14th March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Olsen Irwin GalleryThe Sartorialist

THIS & THAT: Ann Thomson

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

Arthouse Gallery’s ‘In The Still’ groupshow explores the idea of the still life through the eyes of twelve contemporary Australian artists. Diverse in materiality and application, from large scale floral single blooms to 3D compositions, the essence of the everyday or the moment, is always present.

Craig Waddell’s intimate paintings of tactile blooms are almost scientific in their botanist dialogue. Miranda Skoczek‘s vivid colourscapes ground and isolate one object while others ghost in the background, part dreamscape, part consciousness. Laura Jones‘ paintings are more traditional yet informal and celebratory with their lurid textiles, bright blooms and festive fodder. Leah Fraser’s condensed imagery is fanciful, a collision of flora and fauna, decoratively wild and free. Kirra Jamison’s floral impressions are visual imprints, like firecrackers when you close your eyes. Claudia Damichi’s ikebana-inspired portrait is laced with symbols like a graphic equation to the organic structure. While Heidi Yardley’s split-natured compositions from yesteryear, smudged and soft, are reminiscent of black and white photos of 1950’s Hollywood beauties.

‘In The Still’ is a collection of bountiful jaunty combinations of the actual versus the abstract.

‘In the Still’ Group Show
Arthouse Gallery
66 McLachlan Avenue
Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011
Tuesday – Friday: 9.30am – 6.00pm
Saturday 10.00am: 5.00pm
Sunday – Monday: Closed
Until 21st March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Arthouse Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: ‘IN THE STILL’ GROUP SHOW

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