Preen by Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015 Ready-to-Wear

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

In/Out: Preen Thornton Bregazzi Spring 2015

Preen by Thorton Bregazzi is the work of Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi. Their ready-to-wear Spring 2015 collection hit the catwalk with a blast of colour and pattern. Taking their inspiration from cricket, 80’s hip hop and the African Masai it’s no wonder they delivered a complex, layered look.

Renowned for deconstructing vintage looks with a penchant for the Victorian era, this new direction was much more athletic. It was a heady mix of asymmetrical, disassembled and collaged tailoring with exposed chunky plastic zippers, beaded fringing and quilted tops.

The patchworks of prints with strong linear graphics resembled jungle camo of the future. Hints of neon cheekily popped through black and white illustrations. Flowing florals were decidedly feminine, while strong sports stripes in red and navy were assertive.

Credits: Style.com

Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

Today we pay homage to the renowned Brazilian architect Sergio Rodrigues (1927-2014), and reflect on his contribution to Brazilian furniture design.

Most famously know for his ‘Mole’ armchair (1957) Sergio Rodrigues was dedicated to the design and production of Brazilian furniture. Strongly influenced by the Modernist movement he instilled a very distinct national style into his designs. Using local materials, he preferred to work in teak and leather. His masculine chairs are showstoppers; they are gregarious and handsome, generous in proportion and spirit. The perfect hosts, they promise you comfort like no other. You know that over time their patina will be testimonials to their true quality.

We also are great admirers of his Aspas armchair (1962), with it’s bullhorn embrace. His Mocho stool (1954) is a perfect sidekick with its cupped seat and Rodrigues’ characteristic bulbous legs. These are lovingly crafted objects, incredibly sculptured and robust in personality.

In 1955, Sergio Rodrigues created the Oca Store. This Rio de Janeiro showroom was not only a showcase of his furniture but also an important meeting place for intellectuals and artists. Doubling up as a gallery space it encouraged and promoted artistic and design endeavors.

On 15th May 2012 The Selby was invited in to Rodrigues’ studio to document this creative genius in his environment. What a beautiful shoot ensued, an inspirational visual language of intellectual wisdom and good humour. Playful bold colours are the back drop to piles of books and paper rolls. His sketches, prototypes and miniature models pepper the space.

Proud of his heritage and with a progressive energy, his legacy of furniture will be treasured for generations to come.

Credits: The Selby

Saloni Spring Summer 2015 Ready-to-Wear

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: Saloni Spring Summer 2015

London based Fashion Designer Lodha Saloni brings us a celebration of optimism in her Spring Summer 2015 collection. Vivid colours and spirited hand-painterly patterns are teamed up with confident, classic, feminine cuts.

Saloni designs for the free spirit. Her tailoring is suggestive, with a side of intelligence. Plunging necklines complement long sleeves or wide pants, bare shoulders fall down to mature hemlines, mini shorts and skirt lines are accompanied by jackets or loose tops with mid-length sleeves. Maxi, mini, capri, a-line, playsuit, flounce and flirt – its all here!

And how about those colours? Apricots, mustards, canary yellow, soft neutrals and then bang: king-parrot red, royal blue, apple, oak leaf and lime green, mandarin orange and boy blue. Its a heady mix, balanced beautifully across the collection.

Credits: Vogue

Out/About: Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

It is the quintessential white washed walls, with their rich textures and vernacular forms, that make for the perfect backdrops to the regional objets d’art at the Masseria Cimino. A rustic, beautifully restored, and lovingly-curated guesthouse in Puglia, Italy, this family-run haven is full of history. It’s stone building blocks date back to 6th century B.C., recycled in the 1700’s to build this extraordinary farmhouse’s perimeter wall.

The hotel is honest and authentic, its fabrics simple, bed linens crisp, bed spreads locally crafted. Vine-ripening tomatoes bountifully hang between raw lightbulbs from the breakfast room. Knobbly and knotted old olive trees and cacti adorn the garden creating an endless supply of decorative foliage to bring inside. Sun loungers are covered by simple white canvas shades, brass taps float over raw stone basins, window frames are painted a subtle shade of blue and bowls of lemons abound. Roaring open fires and candlelit rooms add to the contemplative authentic simplicity, the slowing down of pace, and the purity of time spent at this ancient abode.

Set against the backdrop of the blue yonder of the Adriatic this beauty beckons to the soul a celebration of all that is the good life.

Credits: Masseria Cimino, Carla Coulson, Project Fairytale

Michael Anastassiades For Flos

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

London based, Cypriot born, lighting designer Michael Anastassiades‘ new collection for Flos, String and IC, are works of lighting genius. Having launched his studio in 1994, after frustrating attempts to amalgamate into the design mould, he was now free to design and produce, a bold and courageous move for which the design world is endlessly thankful. Anastassides, now inducted into the design hall of fame with his new collection for Flos, joins their tirelessly brilliant roll call of classics.

As he puts it, “i’m interested in the instability that exists in design”, a common thread that runs though his design aesthetic. The IC collection of balanced balls are caught mid-roll or perched precariously atop a brass rod. It’s no wonder that the starting point for these was watching a street juggler at work. The name ‘IC’ is a reference to the initials that the English police use for describing the ethnicity of a person. He doesn’t expand on this point but the precariousness is undoubtedly hinted at.

The String series own their space. They are a delightful play of minimalist sculpture and brilliant functionality. First conceived by the power lines of trains, Anastassiades elaborates further about his inspiration describing the way traditional village squares in the Mediterranean are delineated by a festive string of lights. Even though they are delicate, they are striking in their volume and their division of space. The ball or cone forms of the Anastassides’ String series are suspended pure objects yet their they fine strings colonises the architectural story of the space they occupy.

We could bask in Michael Anastassiades’ luminousity for many years to come. What a treat.

Credits: Style Park, Minimalissimo, Flos, Flodeau, Larcobaleno, archiportale

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