Out/About: George Byrne ‘Local Division’

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

In/Out: Out/About: George Byrne 'Local Division'

George Byrne found himself living and working in Los Angeles quite by accident. As a photographic artist taking direct inspiration from the world that surrounds him he increasingly found his hometown of Sydney wasn’t providing the goods. Byrne moved to Los Angeles in 2010, after a short stint in New York City, and hasn’t looked back. ‘Local Division’ is his first major exhibition in Australia since the move and this collection of work powerfully interrogates his new locale.

Byrne spends most of his working day travelling the vast, sprawling metropolis in his car, seeking scenes from the urban landscape that prompt him to stop and document. He explains that there is a distinct combination of light, colour and form that he seeks but it is not purely these compositional requirements that make for a successful image. Byrne imbues his chosen scene with a sense of the place and time; sometimes isolated and airless or a moment of unexpected beauty, the poetry of everyday life.

A major influences on Byrne’s art has been the work of the Topographic Photo Movement that began in America in the mid 70s and saw pictures stripped of their artistic frills and reduced to simplified lines, reduced palette and the importance of the shadow as much as the object. These arrangements ensure that the work becomes more abstract as the artist attempts to solve puzzles in the arrangement of the pictorial elements “until they click.”

Byrne finds beauty in seemingly ordinary urban spaces set amongst essentially disposable architecture. A single figure, a pick up truck, fire hydrant or a brightly painted curb anchor the work but they are by no means the subject. Similarly Byrne rarely captures the gaze of the people he photographs, without the self-consciousness that comes with the realisation that they are being shot his figures become every man (they become us) and the developed photograph speaks of urban isolation and the unrelenting nature of city life. Byrne cleverly intersperses these works with lighter, summery vignettes, a string of brightly coloured balloons drift carelessly on the palest of blue skies and a lolly pink pool ring floats temptingly on an aquamarine swimming pool. He unifies the collection through a palette of sun-bleached pastels that skillfully confirms our perception of the city of angels.

George Byrne ‘Local Division’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Mon – Fri: 10 – 6
Sat: 10 – 5
Sun: 11 – 5
10 – 28 February 2016

Credits: Courtesy of the artist George Byrne and Olsen Irwin Gallery
Words by Katrina Arent

Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016

In/Out: Dries Van Noten Spring 2016Looking through Dries Van Noten’s Spring 2016 collection is a bit like entering a magical forest, or inside the jewellery box of a flamboyant movie star. Shiny fabrics and exquisite prints, bright colours and clashing colours, bold structures and fantastic embellishment – it’s eclecticism that characterises this collection (and in fact Van Noten’s eponymous label). And that’s precisely what the Belgian designer set out to do – to design a range of clothing for someone “flamboyant”. “For me that was the starting word of this collection,” he says, “that she enjoys life, she wears and she dares.”

Bold, unique, and rather fabulous are the embroidered coats in light blue and navy blue, ankle-length trousers that reflect the light, full skirts and tamer skirts, tops in glorious shades of pink, purple, mustard and aquamarine, gloves – a nod to the fashion of the 1940s, and patterns upon patterns – some that spread to the models’ bodies.

In some ways you could say it’s an expected collection from Dries Van Noten – out there and full of colour, but that would be to miss the magic. The Spring 2016, while definitely at home with the brand’s previous 20 years of designs, is entirely new; it – impressively – serves up a whole new set of colour and fabric combinations, ways of mixing colour and material. Dries Van Noten has a way of working and thinking about design that is entirely his own and quite incredible, letting material and shape play together to drive the design, finding new ways of applying colour and mixing them by giving chance and experimentation centre stage. Rather than an after thought, colour, for example, often drives the design entirely, starting with a shade Van Noten lets it evolve so that it in the end it is largely responsible for bringing to life the garment. Fabric, which is sourced from as far as Tokyo and Calcutta, he applies in chic, elegant design; letting forms come into being over time rather than following a drawing; takes inspiration from anywhere and everywhere, at any time. In a word, it’s imagination at its very heart.

As is clear from this stunning collection, process is just as important – if not more so – than the final product, because that is where the magic happens.

Credits: Dries Van Noten via Vogue
Photography: Yannis Vlamos

Sunday Supply Co.

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

 

 

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

 

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply CompanyIn/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply CompanyIn/Out: Sunday Supply CompanyVintage flowers, animal prints and classic stripes, soft cotton tassels and lightly varnished beachwood handles, a very generous canopy and custom hardwares; these beach umbrellas by Sunday Supply Co. – which mark the Australian brand’s debut collection – are truly beautiful and wonderfully practical.

The five unique prints – playfully named Natural Instinct, Black Sands, Jungle Canopy, Animal Kingdom and Summer Deck – are all perfectly suited to the beach, blending in and reflecting the summery atmosphere they’ll sit in. Whether it’s the vintage floral or the tropical jungle, the stripes or loose spots, each design is done in a warm, gentle colour palette and the pattern kept simple. And while there is a definite vintage tone giving the umbrellas that lovely lived-in look, they’re also equally fresh.

The actual working of the umbrellas’ design is of course the other factor we’re drawn to. Not only pretty, these umbrellas are made to last – obviously the design of true-beach goers who know the strength of the Australian sun and that the accessories will be used and used again. Sunday Supply Co. has opted for only premium quality fabric (UPF30+) and custom designed hinge mechanisms and hardware. The pole is simple and collapsible, designed to cover all angles and be manoeuvred with ease, and each umbrella has its own carry bag for convenience. Yes, these boutique umbrellas tick both boxes; Sunday Supply Co. certainly know how to do summer.

Credits: Sunday Supply Co.

M2Malletier & ‘La Fabrica’

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

M2Malletier bags are strong. They’re characterised by geometric shapes and definite lines, bold blocks of colour and, perhaps most significantly, distinctive barlike hardware designed by Melissa Losada Bofill and Marcelea Valez. The space – and only space – in which the signature handbags are designed is even more so. M2Malletier’s studio is housed in ‘La Fabrica’, a postmodern masterpiece – a statement in futuristic design and incredible engineering crafted by Ricardo Bofill (father of Losada’s husband, Pablo), widely considered one of Europe’s seminal postmodernists.

Known as perhaps his signature architectural achievement, La Fabrica was originally a concrete factory and was renovated by Bofill in the 1970s to house his family and his international architectural practice, ‘Taller de Arquitectura’. In line with his other public works, such the Barcelona Airport’s Terminal 1 and various hotels of stunning magnitude including the Costes K in Paris, La Fabrica’s 32,000-square-foot space is dramatic, brutal and romantic, quite arresting on the whole.

As a start, it’s the copious amounts of concrete that grab your attention – an industrial material that is strong in every sense of the word. Then there are thee ceilings, reaching 30 feet in some places and creating the most generous of spaces to wander through, almost overpowering if one were to be alone in them. There are also windows inspired by ancient roman arches dotted everywhere, allowing light to stream into the rooms and land on the walls, and from the exterior punctuate the raw concrete façade. Around the building are giant spouts which once poured concrete, giving the structure its extraterrestrial feel, ivy now sprouting from the cracks that add to the surrealist tone.

The space isn’t all hard brutalist lines though. Inside, and in the corner in which M2Malletier have their studio, the building brutalist concrete lines are softened by luxurious fabrics, accessories and furniture – a white lounge sits on dusty blue carpet, there are plants and books, paintings and warm wood. The most dreamy addition though has to be the curtains, billowing ivory floor-to-ceiling sheets of fabric that give the space a mystical kind of charm against the strength of the architecture.

As a setting for the handbag studio it’s perfect too – the combination of architectural and historic references and minimalist design fitting well with the pair behind M2Malletier, Melissa Losada Bofill and Marcelea Valez, whose design aesthetic is structured and simple, calling on the past as well as looking to the future. “We were inspired for our hardware by strong, basic things as well — industrial shapes, medical instruments and medieval tools,” says Losada Bofill, “and we are also very serious about engineering and balance.” But not only is working amid Brutalist grandeur on such scale “inspiring and a bit extraterrestrial” for the pair now, but it helped inform the entire brand. ‘‘Every bag I have ever designed has been sketched at La Fabrica,’’ says Losada Bofill. ‘‘Even before we had a formal company, wandering around this place made me want to create.’’

In the end, it’s a beautiful story that goes full circle, where history and architecture, family and fashion merge, and the magical La Fabrica is the glue that holds it together.

Credits: The New York Times Style Magazine
Photography: Danilo Scarpati

Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016
In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

In/Out: Erdem Pre-Fall 2016

Welcome to Erdem Pre-Fall 2016! Midnight blues and deep greens, whimsical florals and berry reds, elegant cuts and bold ones, ruffles and velvet, it’s a collection that brings to mind fantastical worlds where flower gardens bathed in moonlight always exist.

What’s particularly fantastic about Erdem Moralioglu’s collection is that at the same time it is pretty it is also powerful. Among the dresses, skirts, jackets and tops (the Canadian designer choosing not to create trousers), there are both very structured pieces and gentle flowing ones, bold block colours as well as delicate prints, strong necklines and some with much more dainty details. And there’s often a fine merging of the two aesthetics in one piece. A full, structured skirt, for example, arresting in it’s A-line cut, is fitted at the waist and the material is dotted in pretty blue flowers and metallic sheen; or a dress made entirely of lace – the most romantic of materials – is given punch with the addition of a strong neckline punctuated by black velvet. Where there are high necks there are gentle ruffles, where there are wide arms there are beautiful layers, with dark colours come details.

In essence, it’s a feminine collection with guts, a celebration of classic beauty that appeals to the modern woman at the same time. Of course, Moralioglu turned for this collection to American painter John Singer Sergeant for inspiration, so we’d expect nothing less than a collection of clothing in which women are made stars – the striking look book making that absolutely clear.

Credits: Erdem via Vogue

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