Thomas Brown ‘Hacienda’ for Case Da Abitare

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

Here’s a little bit of bold and mod eye candy from London-based photographer, Thomas Brown. Shot for Italian magazine ‘Case Da Abitare’ and aptly named ‘Hacienda’, this graphic set is a nod to the famous Manchester nightclub. We love the use of the Lichtenstein-esque primary colours and strong black lines in the street-signage-style screens. It is superhuman comic book colours, highly saturated and full of confidence. Thomas Brown means business, living large style of the 1980s with a contemporary hit of new iconic pieces from the likes of Mooi, Established&Sons, Gubi and E15.

Credits: Thomas Brown

Nina Donis

In/Out: Nina Donis

In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis
In/Out: Nina Donis

Muscovites, Nina Tatiana and Donis Pupis, are the creative duo behind fashion label Nina Donis. Not new to the scene having started their fashion label 14 years ago, their hard work has paid off. They are now considered to be at the head of Russia’s most influential designers.

Each garment is homogenous in colour with carefully orchestrated bold singular broad brushstrokes of contrasting colour – almost as if a paint roller has been applied. These are uniforms for the style conscious. Simple in form, the fabric choice and nominal embellishment is what gives them a deliciously breezy effect. They are construction worker, meets farm picnic, meets Japanese origami, meets an austere English sensibility with a rainy day melancholia.

Tatiana and Pupis have been tagged as ‘pioneers of the experimental minimalist design in Russia’. It’s an earnest compliment that is well deserved.

Credits: Thisispaper Magazine

OUT/ABOUT: Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

Villa Lena is an Italian paradise like no other. Set in the Tuscan hills, this unique guesthouse promotes nothing but the good life. Not only does it offer a variety of accommodation but also has an in-house artist residency that fosters multidisciplinary creative talent.

The trio behind this picturesque hotel has varied but complimentary backgrounds. Lena Evstafieva is a contemporary art consultant; Jerome Hadey has a Parisian band ‘Outlines’, and Lionel Bensemoun set up Paris night club, ‘Le Baron’. As they note, “together, they wanted to bring in one place their experiences in music, art, entertainment, film, fashion and other creative fields and create a unique retreat.”

The estate is made up of a combination of buildings all clustered around the main villa, which was built by a local family, the Ferrini Del Frate, in the 18th century. The central idea being that everyone gets together on long lazy Tuscan nights for an aperitif, music and dancing. All set against the backdrop of Mediterranean hills and rolling fields.

The Villa caters to the lone ranger, lovers, friends and families with the choice of single rooms, apartments or whole villas. And then of course there is the artist’s residence where Sophie Buhai created her architectural jewellery pieces seen on In/Out not so very long ago.

The rooms, designed by Parisian Clarisse Demory, are sparse and wistful, as soft and pure as the Tuscan sunlight that pours through their windows. Minimalist, honest vintage furniture are accompanied by a fanfare of hero pieces such as the cane rocking horse or Ettore Sottsass’s ‘Tahiti’ table lamp sitting on Superstudio’s ‘Quaderna’ table from Zanotta. Floral arrangements sourced from the property’s garden complete the picture.

Everything seems to come full circle in this paradise. The grounds boast their own veggie garden and what isn’t grown on-site is locally sourced. The rooms are decorated with past resident-artists’ works. The Villa has a shop that promotes it’s in-house artistic collaborations along with a carefully curated selection of local crafts, the estate’s homemade olive oil and wine. It’s a tender project with heart and soul captured beautifully by photographers Coke Bartrina and Frederik Vercruysse.

Credits: Coke Batrina & Frederik Vercruysse for Villa Lena

THE AVENUE BY ARENT&PYKE

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

‘The Avenue’ is an Arent&Pyke project very dear to our hearts. We have won a number of national awards with this project and it continues to be shortlisted for many more national and international awards! The Avenue was featured in Vogue Living earlier this year and it is most certainly time to share this home in its entirety!

This 1880’s terrace in Randwick called for an update that would respect its grand heritage and uplift the spaces, revealing its beauty and creating new moments of joy. Respecting the original architecture, the success of this project relied on our ability to marry a modern family life lived within old walls with a timeless style executed in a contemporary fashion.

Once a boarding house, some rooms were stripped back to their original forms, while others were repurposed to provide a study, master robe, ensuite and bathroom. Our collaboration with the architect led to the design of new openings in the kitchen extension, and the important integration of new exterior forms with the existing envelope.

In homage to the timelessness of the existing architecture, our materials palette for the built elements was intentionally restrained. This allowed us to layer colour and texture in the decorative phase of the project. We undertook an intensively detailed curatorial design process to celebrate the grandiose architecture, harmonise the clients’ varying aesthetic and develop an eclectic yet cohesive; balanced yet unexpected; collection of spaces. When designing the spaces we worked with a range of materials, and details which complement each other to create a character for the home which is both cohesive and eclectic.

We approached the rear extension kitchen with a timeless application of classic materials and iconic pieces. White joinery, a stainless steel workbench, basalt benchtop, accents of American oak are complimented by iconic lighting from Artek to resonate with the strong black steel framed doors. Clean and uncluttered, the bold colour palette was developed in response to the clients’ much loved Enzo Mari “Apple” print.

In the formal living spaces and master bedroom, deep hues of blue and sea-green anchor the decorative schemes. Responding to the opulent scale of the bedroom, the custom-designed bed, ottoman, and antique armoire are all overly-scaled elements. Highly detailed Fornasetti wallpaper wraps through the master dressing room and ensuite, reducing the scale in these more intimate spaces with its hand-drawn appeal and whimsical cloud motif. Window treatments with accents of silk and the decorative lighting call the eye to the vast ceiling heights.

There is a recurrent preoccupation in our practice with creating spaces that are unique, individually tailored and decorative yet not over decorated. The Avenue reveals the very nature of our design process of ‘curating’ and ‘creating’, a careful balancing act. The idea of creating spaces and using finishes that could withstand the next two hundred years was importantly at the front of our minds.

‘The Avenue’ was the kind of project we always dreamt of, a unique and inspiring synergy between client, architect Tom Ferguson of TFAD and Arent&Pyke.

Credits: Photography by Anson Smart, Shoot styling by Megan Morton

WRONG FOR HAY

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

2_wfh

1_wfh

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

In/Out: Wrong For Hay

Wrong For Hay is a fruitful relationship of some very big players in the furniture design world, Danish design house Hay and London-based designer Sebastian Wrong. Hay is known for it’s accessible, beautifully considered furniture pieces. Whilst Sebastian Wrong embraces the avant-garde as ex-design director and co-founder of British design royalty, Established&Sons.

Initially brought on board to introduce a lighting range to Hay, Wrong soon grew to incorporate furniture pieces and textiles from both established and emerging designers. There are some heavy weights like Natalie Du Pasquier (founding member of the Memphis group) and Bernhard Wilhelm whose playful textiles are true pop. Then you have the ‘Trion’ table, a fun take on the trestle leg by Shane Schneck. Anderssen&Voll have created the most deliciously coloured ‘Ori’ salt and pepper grinders. Bertjan Pot’s delightful ‘Pion’ table lamp comes flat packed, a stitched paper silhouette that pops into its 3d shape with a simple gesture. And of course, there are the in-house designs by Wrong such as the ‘Bentwood Mirror’ with its distinguishable shape, the round lipped ‘Serve’ table and the ‘Slope’ and ‘Neu’ chairs that have a refined typically English boarding school feel to them. We love the layman’s references in the names such as the ‘Hackney’ sofa and the ‘Stanley’ Stool.

Wrong for Hay is a collection of gusty practical pieces with that quirk of English humour. The name says it all really ‘Wrong For Hay’! This new collection represents what can happen when you bring a cheeky Londoner to the party.

Credits: Wrong for Hay

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