LEANNE SHAPTON ‘MONDAY SHOWER SONGS’

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

New Yorker, Leanne Shapton’s watercolours ‘Monday Shower Songs’ are exactly what they suggest, cosmetic vessels of morning rituals teamed up with classic ballads. Having art directed in some very big named publications, including the New York Times, Shapton’s sense of visual balance is arresting in this celebration of the ordinary.

Soap, shampoo, creams, shavers, tweezers, fliptops, nozzles and jars all make it into this parade of colour and shape. Shapton reminds us of the simple pleasures; the colours almost correlating the delight of belting out a classic tune in the privacy of your bathroom. Moody, muted, tones mixed with bright bursts of orange, pink and yellow. Your mental jukebox locates each song and you catch yourself smiling, this is a universal recollection, the start of a new day, clean and free.

Appearing in The New York Times on the last week of each month, Shapton’s series have featured on In/Out quite some time ago. Our delight in Shapton’s work continues.

Leanne Shapton is also one part of J&L Books, a non-profit publishing house that produces contemporary artist limited edition books.

Credits: NY Times

KATE ROBERTSON

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

In/Out: Kate Robertson

Australian artist Kate Robertson’s anthropologic studies are visually captivating, abstract maps. Ironically, they resemble scientific microscopic investigations in their repetition and scale.

Robertson immerses herself within a community, “working in the ‘between space’ of contemporary art and ethnography”. Gathering physical organic matter such as leaves and dirt, she using photographic techniques to create these delicate cosmic contact prints.

Credits: Kate Roberston

OUT/ABOUT: ‘Living Edge’ Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

Sydney is in for yet another treat with the launch of Living Edge’s new showroom opening this week in the Woolstores, Alexandria. Previously, spread over two showrooms they’ve united to showcase the cache of treasures they are so known and loved for.

Ranging from the timeless classics of Herman Miller, Walter Knoll and Louis Poulsen to the future classics of e15, La Chance and Established&Sons, the showroom is a beautifully restrained, minimalist canvas for such exceptional talent. Designed by Woods Bagot, the space’s characteristic warehouse bones are celebrated yet its reincarnation is sleek.

On the ground floor, a series of dedicated platforms are offered up to each of the brands they represent. The brief was to; “create a series of mini environments… allowing each brand its own designated space using different materials and finishes to create a unique backdrop for their product”. A cosy e15 party incorporates one of our new favourites, the Enoki side table, while the Walter Knoll loungeroom with the Flow Chair and Grand Suite Sofa presides over the double height space.

The mezzanine is dedicated to Herman Miller’s “Living Office” concept. This enables the team at Living Edge to not only work within this environment, but to also offer a seductive testament to the end user of how function and form can unite in the workspace. As they put it; “It has completely changed our way of working and I think we’ll continue to see more benefits, not only in terms of the client interface but internally as well.”

The overarching concept is to showcase each of the Living Edge brands in their own dedicated space. It’s a move towards an exhibition-style showroom experience – our customers should feel as though they’re walking through the Milan Furniture Fair (without the hordes!). Each furniture ‘pod’ is designed to be true to the aesthetic of the brand it represents.

Tailored for the refined connoisseur looking for an Eames Classic Lounge & Ottoman, or the contemporary collector after La Chance’s Bolt Stool, Living Edge’s new Woolstore, Alexandria, showroom is now open.

Photo Credits: Living Edge

OUT/ABOUT: Geoffrey Bawa’s House, Colombo Sri Lanka

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

Number 11, Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa’s private residence in Colombo, is an eclectic lesson in refined taste. At once architecturally cultured and almost primitively executed, it is peppered with unexpected follies and exotic moments of the outside brought in.

Elegant and raw, tactile rendered walls meet glossy epoxied floors and heavy thick arched walls provide cool comfort. Intricate traditional carved timber doors and columns represent the abundant local craftsmanship. Peppered around the house are Bawa’s own furniture designs, prototypes for the pieces he designed for hotels and homes around the country and the world, a delicate combination of new vision and traditional materials. Meticulous attention to decorative detail are present in Bawa designed glass and brass wall sconce and sinuous cast wrought iron balustrade, which snakes from the ground floor up the tower to the roof terrace.

Sensitive to his tropical surroundings Bawa’s house is abundant in air and light. Areas are separated by gardens and courtyards so short courtyard exterior vistas are always present. Rustic stones inlaid in the floor or an impromptu stone bench are constant reminders of the relationship between the built environment and nature. It’s this perfect interior/exterior balance that creates such an idyllic tranquil gallery-esque home.

Alive with culture, his highly curated interiors include textile masterpieces by Ena de Silva and hand-painted doors by Australian artist Donald Friend (the originals of which can be found in the Art Gallery of New South Wales). Skillful at uniting the unlikely, religious artefacts preside over contemporary sculpture in a pastiche of exotic, vernacular, tribal and modern influences.

Recently visited by Arent&Pyke designer Dominique, the exotic enchantment and timelessness of Bawa’s own home is undeniably captivating. Bawa’s mix of Asian soul and European education is clearly expressed in his architectural and interior genius.

The doors of Bawa home are thrown open to visitors for accommodation and house tours.

Photography by: Dominique Brammah

ALEX PROBA ‘A POSTER A DAY’

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

For German-born New-York based Alex Proba, ‘A Poster A Day’ project, is a daily exercise. An impulsive personal visual journal in poster format, her theme although abstract to most is clear as written word to her.

Currently working as the Art Director for Kickstarter, Alex found herself at a loss one day, and instead of her usual escapades into inspiration she started graphically doodling. Realising how much she was enjoying the process of creating freely, with no preconceived thought pattern, she decided to dedicate 30 minutes a day to expressing her instinctual intellect through collaging. As Proba puts it “there are many days when abstraction guides my design, and for some it may be hard to imagine what my day looked liked based on purely graphical posters. But for me, it’s the alignment of occurrences that make me explore symmetry, geometric shapes, and patterns.…….. Previously, I wasn’t even able to remember what I ate the day before. The posters restore my past, and that’s magical and beautiful.”

Having exhibited her first year at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg, New York, she is now looking forward to the next year of ‘Yours-A Poster A Day’. Shifting attention from herself to other peoples stories Alex is calling for submissions to interpret into her astute graphic dialect in 2015.

Credits: Studio Proba

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