Dinosaur Designs ‘Flower’

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

With the unfurling of a petal, the gentle nod of a head and the flamboyant ripple of a skirt, Dinosaur Designs‘ new collection ‘Flower’ is a blossoming of brilliant colour and life – the beautiful progression from Creative Director Louise Olsen’s 2014 Seed Pod collection.

With the artful realisation of opaque, translucent and mottled textures of resin, Olsen’s elegant structural forms are delicate yet weighty. Celebrating the “unexpected nature of nature”, ‘Flower’ evokes both fragility and strength, and continues that endless exploration of the dialogue between human and plant life.

Credits: Dinosaur Designs

STUDIO KO ‘Villa E’

In/Out: Villa E by Studio KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO
Perched high on a hill like a modern day monastery, the ‘Villa E’, sits at the base of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Designed by Frenchmen Karl Fournier and Olivier Marty of architectural ‘Studio KO’, it is romantic minimalism at its best. Thoughtful, well-executed spaces are expansive whilst remaining intimately soothing to the soul.

Clean lines set in structural precision control the fall of natural light in to the home as it delicately casts across textural walls. Outside walls, viewed from a carefully orchestrated window are a sun-scorched terracotta, blazingly bright against the calm neutrals of the villa’s interior.

Throughout, in materiality and craftsmanship, there is a deep appreciation for the inherent beauty and sense of history found in raw materials. The dry stonewall from local Oika stone is jig-sawed by a pure artisan, it is rustic yet meditatively rigourous. Its construction is nothing short of poetic when juxtaposed with the clarity of line seen elsewhere, in the lone marble plinth, so seamless in it’s perfection.

There is a majestic sense of scale to this grand haven. From the surrounding terrain, to the built environment with its towering walls, to its almost forbidding front door and vast pivoting walls of glazing. This is a contemporary abode with its spirit firmly rooted in its surrounding environment.

Credits: Studio Ko, Photography by Dan Glasser

OUT/ABOUT: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

Nestled in Cradle Mountain/Lake St Clair National Park, in Tasmania, siting regally out on Lake St Clair sits ‘Pumphouse Point’. The hotel, is a whimsical gem of industry, repurposed as a contemplative retreat. Built in the 1930’s to house the water turbines for the State’s hydropower system, the exterior shell has been left as is. Weather beaten and lichen covered, it’s surface is a visual history of 85 years of industrial endurance.

The brainchild of tourism entrepreneur Simon Currant, ‘Pumphouse Point’ was realized with the help of Hobart & Launceston-based architect Peter Walker of Cumulus Studio. A second generation Taswegian Walker’s, affiliation with the treasured landscape of his homeland is evident in the design. Walker says, “From inception we envisaged that the Pumphouse Point redevelopment should encapsulate rugged simplicity and unrefined comfort”. This is an honest retreat for lovers of the vast outdoors.

‘Pumphouse Point’ consists of two buildings; The Pumphouse perched out on the lake, and The Shorehouse 250m inland both connected by a dramatically straight concrete pier. The 18 suites are bare bones cosy. Local Tasmanian Oak, wool carpet, wool felted blankets atop crisp white sheets are all you need. Exposed brass pipes pump pristine water into your monochromatic bathroom. Tranquil sanctuaries, the common spaces have combustion fires to warm your body as you stare out at the wonder of nature.

The original structures are off-form concrete, their recent incarnation embracing the industrial history engrained in the fabric of the buildings whilst being snug with creature comforts. A spectacular place of solace with a true frontier spirit!

Credits: Pumphouse Point
Photohgraphy by:
Adam John Gibson and Stuart Gibson 

DADU SHIN ‘I DON’T LIKE CLOTHES’

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

In/Out: Dadu Shin - I don't like clothes

New York illustrator Dadu Shin’s personal project ‘I don’t like clothes’ is a series of whimsical drawings assembled from visual reference, fashion and folly.

‘I don’t like clothes’ came about when the volume of Shin’s editorial workload drove him to find an expressive release without a brief. Shin’s figures are mute, their clothes owning the person and dictating their identity; the street girl in Converse high tops and an army bomber jacket, the glam diva in a full-length golden gown, the black and white checked muse, the Lagerfeld-inspired zigzag, the kimono-ed geisha, the psychedelic guru, all relishing in their timelessness.

Like most illustrators Shin is a constant doodler, his nimble fingers racing to keep time with the creative pace of his work. Early in his vocation he’d tried to pigeon hole his style, but he found instead this quashed his creative expression. Working with mediums from pencil through to ink, paint and gouache, his drawings are diverse in character and meaning. Embracing his eclectic flair has ensured that his work is now found everywhere from Harper’s Bazaar to the New Yorker.

Credits: Dadu Shin

ALANA WILSON ‘COLLECTION II’

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

In/Out: Alana Wilson

Sydney-based ceramicist Alana Wilson’s new collection II has a tiptoeing poise and a sense of lightness evocative of Degas’s ballet dancers. With a dancer’s sense of graceful composure and movement, their feminine forms hover high on fine bases, their sweeping tops generously flared.

Delicately poetic, they have a preciousness that only comes from something so tenderly crafted. Wilson uses a slip cast technique to ensure multiples of one form. She then applies layers of stoneware glaze, creating imperfect surfaces of warm milky whites and metallic dense blacks and bronzes so that each piece has completely unique.

The captured images of Wilson’s work, styled and shot by floral artist Simone Gooch of Fjura, echoes Wilson’s other inspiration; Ikebana, where the two elements – vessel and flora – unite humanity and nature. Wilson’s vessels are an integral partner to the blooms, open throated they sing for their host.

Wilson’s work is exceptional, her love for the contextual, intertwined with her quest for experimental contemporary glazing techniques, ensures that the result is something that is so very captivating and mesmerisingly ethereal.

Credits: Ceramics & Creative Direction by Alana Wilson, Photography, Styling & Florals by Simone Gooch

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