Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

Brooklyn based ceramicist Natalie Weinberger‘s collection of earthenware is lovingly articulated. There is a considered architectural sensibility, each piece looking ergonomically snug, with a scale perfect for the grasp of human hand.

Having experimented with glass blowing from an early age, it was whilst studying the art of historic preservation that Weinberger enrolled in an undergraduate ceramics course and from there, as they say, ‘the rest is history’. Weinberger credits her former studies with an ongoing interest in referencing past forms. It goes without saying that she finds a wonderland of sculptural forms in ceramics, perhaps the earliest form of artistic and functional expression in civilised society. Although her stoneware clay is rustic in nature, she coaxes very refined shapes from it.

The styling of Weinberger’s pieces is poetic, soft and dreamy, the peppered surfaces reflecting their materiality. There is a beautiful duality of the whole and the deconstructed when the pieces are viewed together against that artisanal mosaic backdrop.

Arched vases, splattered platters, morning coffee cups drip fed with delicately coiled handles and sweet dumbbellesque objet d’art, there is a bohemian refinement to Weinberger’s creations.

Credits: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

Deep in the soul, bound in history, rich in nutrients is Clay & Earth. Irresistibly tactile, this Palette has a hearty earthiness and a patina that benefits from warm hands, the fiery heart of a kiln, the bleaching of sun and the test of time. Sandy whites, tan, ochre, terracotta, rust, charcoal and dirty greens of wholesome goodness, these are sacred materials borrowed from the core to remind us of our mortality.

Shaped into robust, hearty, sincere objects with muted surfaces smooth to the touch, or powdery soft under fingertips. These items, aged and worn have their own heartbeat, when introduced they immediately alter the ambiance of a room.

They are what we naturally gravitate towards; they balance the built and the synthetic with their texture and depth of hue. Comforting in the impermanence of all, they will one day return from the very clay and earth from whence they came.

Credits:
1. Flickr: Tiagø Ribeiro
Enrique Palacio via Architectural Digest Nic Lehoux via Architectural Digest Archiproducts source unknown Architectural Digest
2. Folk About Bungalow Classic Indré The Tribeca Penthouse source unknown Apparatus
3. Desire to Inspire Faith Interior Oliver Gustav Studio Tiziana Tosoni Australian Traveller
4. Somewhere I Would like to Live source unknown Chevrenoir Bjøkheim Norm Photography

OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher ‘Drinking with the other sun’ & Anh Do ‘Man’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

Julian Meagher in ‘Drinking with the other Sun’ and Anh Do in ‘Man’, now showing at Sydney gallery Olsen Irwin present emotional portraits of men in a raw, yet endearing way, their subjects floating in white space, in paint on canvas. Meagher’s work is ephemeral and ghostly, his subjects reverent, fragile and blurred presences while Do’s men are physically arresting, thickly layered to command space beyond the confines of the canvas.

Sydney-based artist Julian Meagher’s exhibition, ‘Drinking with the other Sun’, is a collection of ethereal paintings layered with a recurrent exploration of the male figures pivotal to the artist, his understanding of masculinity, the evolution of Australia and the legacy of our history.

Although Meagher’s medium is oil on linen, it is his combination of precise linework combined with delicately controlled leaching and dripping that mimics the character of watercolours. It’s a technique that softens the features of faces, the gnarliness of flora and gives dimensional purity to the collections of glass objects.

‘Drinking with the other Sun’ explores the Australian identity by placing male figures that are personally connected or historically known alongside the native flora of Australia and that of our imperial motherland. The history of forefathers portrayed against the hardiness of the Banksia and contrasted with the iconic English Rose (at once delicate and prickly), metaphorically referencing British influence on our national identity. The stoic depiction of Australian masculinity is portrayed by Meagre as an exploration of vulnerability.

Portraits include those of the artist’s cousin Leighton whose father was a matador in the 1960s in Seville, as well as portraits of the great great grandsons of explorers William Wentworth and William Lawson, and the grandson of Sydney Harbour Bridge engineer John Bradfield. Meagher also includes a self-portrait in his father’s shirt.

Meagher comments; “As I’ve grown older I have become much more aware of how both personal and collective inherited history shapes our identity, especially in relation to contemporary Australian masculinity.”

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

Anh Do‘s first solo exhibiton, ‘Man’, is a collection of densely painted portraits of friends of the artist, with creases and crevasses speaking of full lives touched by beauty and pain. Do, a well known comedian, actor, writer and television personality has found his solace in painting.

Complementing Meagher’s preoccupation with masculinity, Do explores the paradox of human nature, exploring that mysterious place of enlightenment behind our public facades and the emotional duality of men. As Do puts it, “I try to pick people if I think I can show the whole story in their faces… It’s very intuitive, I am just looking for those lines between the guy’s eyes or something in the mood he is giving off’.”

Rugged, deep furrows, with flyaway hair and craggy beards are decisively painted with confident brushstrokes, impasto style. Colour accentuates the intensity of Do’s masculine faces in ‘Man’ as they float on their canvases allowing for no distraction from the commanding yet almost familiar subjects.

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

Julian Meagher ‘Drinking with the other Sun’ & Anh Do ‘Man’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday: 12-5
Tuesday-Friday: 10-6
Saturday: 10-5
Sunday: 12-5
Until 10th May 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artists Julian Meagher and Anh Do and Olsen Irwin Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: DANIEL SHIPP ‘BOTANICAL INQUIRY’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

Sydneysider Daniel Shipp’s photographic exhibition ‘Botanical Inquiry’ is a carefully orchestrated arrangement of almost ikebana-like plants and flowers against cinematic backdrops of our cityscapes that are full of drama. Working with vegetation sourced from the streets of Sydney, Shipp hones in to amplify the small natural wonders often overlooked in the hustle and bustle of the everyday.

Playing on scale, Shipp creates an insect-like perspective. We are made to imagine him digging himself into the ground in order to access this viewpoint. With the looming dip of a stem, plants lose their delicateness and become towering, textural structures, beautifully sinuous in form, speaking of the survival of the fittest. The built environment is hazy, solitary and haunting, yet almost insignificant against the drama of plant life, a reminder of the true order of things.

‘Botanical Inquiry’ is fuelled by Shipp’s relentless curiosity of the interaction with and simultaneous existence of the built and the natural environments.

Daniel Shipp ‘Botanical Inquiry’
Saint Cloche Gallery
37 Macdonald Street
Paddington NSW
Monday – Friday: 8am – 4pm
Saturday – Sunday: 8am – 5pm
Until May 3rd

Credits: Courtesy of the Artist & Saint Cloche Gallery

CHAT IN A CHAIR: RYAN LOBO

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

Although fashion design duo Ryan Lobo and Ramon Martin of Tome hail from Sydney, last week was the very first time the pair have shown at Fashion Week Australia. It was somewhat of a home coming for New York based Lobo and Martin.

Late last year we had the very good fortune of catching up with one half of Tome; an energised Ryan Lobo, for a wonderful short and snappy Chat in a Chair. With the heavily anticipated inaugural showing down under, we spoke with Lobo about what drives the creative dream that is Tome.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

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As a designer who strives to interpret the wondrous complexity of the female form, it is really no wonder that Lobo’s chair of choice is the iconic Eames® Moulded Plywood Lounge Chair, colloquially known as the ‘LCW’. With its compounded curves and exquisite minimalist configuration, it continues to feel contemporary seventy years since its inception. To Lobo, it is “…understated, casual, comfortable confidence”. It is a harmonious coupling – the sincerity of the LCW with the elegance of Lobo’s work – both sharing a sublime understanding of the fundamentals of basic beauty.

Lobo and Martin share a wealth of experience and an infectious passion for fashion, design and art. Recognising each other’s strengths early in their careers whilst studying a Bachelor of Design, Fashion at the University of Technology Sydney they took their time to come together with the knowledge that if they were ever to start a label, it would be together. Martin moved to Europe and the USA to work for Alberta Ferretti, Jean Paul Gaultier and Derek Lam and Lobo worked as a creative consultant, stylist and buyer for prominent Australian brands and magazines. Building their skills independently until the natural sense of time was ripe to come together has resulted in a well-rounded, mature and professional friendship. In 2011, with the world under their belt Tome was born (and remains still) within the world’s most inspiring creative metropolis, New York City.

Tome is not restricted to a place or a time rather, it celebrates the ‘every woman’ who dresses in the infinite wearability – clear cut, essential dressing – of Tome’s classic tailoring, soft silhouettes and seasonal hits of artistically-curated colour.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: TOME

Lobo & Martin have always found remarkable women, both historical and contemporary, to inspire creative stories. For their recent Cruise/Pre fall 2015 collection shown at Fashion Week Australia, Lobo and Martin revisited their teenage crush on the Sylvia Plath masterpiece ‘The Bell Jar’, touched by the depth of its aching beauty. They rediscovered their fascination by listening to voice recordings of Plath’s own voice reading poetry. The visions materialised with crisp structure and 50s-esque silhouettes in largely black and white with an almost restricted sense of femininity. Pieces that are coloured subvert the order of the tailoring with ensembles that pair the soft bodily tones of flesh pink with berry-stained red, and baby blue with electric blue. Sublime details peek through; arcs of lace, square pleats at the bottom of plunging necklines or a provocative slit to the front of a high necked blouse. All ensembles are bound at the waist or the neck with a suggestive gesture of restraint.

The Tome woman is of her time and of all time. She is a vision of both strength and vulnerability.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Ryan Lobo

Who are your favourite artists and why?
I have always loved formidable female artists and their practice. I learnt very young that women have been written out of the history books (well beyond the art world) and so I guess that spurred my interest in art created by women.

I was always intrigued by Hannah Höch, Fiona Hall, Louise Bourgeois, Shirin Neshat, Yoko Ono and Tracey Moffat to name a few.

Art and literature has always informed you work. How do you go about translating what you are inspired by into a marketable piece of clothing?
We are two men who make clothes for women so we miss out on the ultimate purpose of clothing – to actually wear it! So we don’t fall into fantasy with our clothes we select women as our muse for each collection, a kind of guiding light, and become absorbed in that woman’s world. We read about her life, her art practice, and are often as intrigued by her output as her inner life. We are often as attracted to the strictness of their work ethic as the sobriety of their personal style. It’s a mood as well as something literal. It’s very hard to put into words.

Your favourite works of fiction and non fiction and why?
Too hard!
Ok here goes: The Hungry Caterpillar, The Handmaid’s Tale, The God of Small Things, The House of Mirth, and all of Jeanette Winterson, because she is a literary master!
Non fiction: anything from Germaine Greer because she is a hero and a legend and should be taught and revered in schools!

Where else do you turn for inspiration creatively?
We are inspired by dance, music, costume and other designers!

Until now, you’ve never shown TOME in Australia. Can you tell us a little about living and working in NYC and what it has done for you and for TOME? How does it feel to show back home?
It is the most validating thing to be welcomed home with open arms. In the beginning it was really important for us to translate our laid-back and unfussy Australian aesthetic into a U.S. based brand. To bring our downtown NYC woman home to Sydney is a wonderful contrast to the beginning of the inception of Tome.

Living and working in NYC is a dream come true for so many reasons. It is where our homes are and it allows us access to the world.

What is the greatest lesson you have learnt about dressing women?
Never assume anything about who a woman is and what she wants! EVER!

Tell us about the chair of your choice, the Eames LCW…. What makes it special for you? What does the chair represent for you
It sums up my dream existence…understated, casual, comfortable confidence.

Credits:
Chat in a Chair Photography by Luisa Brimble
Shot at The Studio
Runway Photography by Amanda Austin

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