Barber & Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby’s, of Barber & Osgerby work is definitively English in the way that all of Europe is gathered in London – you can see German clarity, an Italian flourish, and Danish purity in their pieces. It’s no surprise then that these talented gents met while studying at the Royal Academy of Arts, a worldly melting pot of artistic genius.

Their forms tend to be sensual and understated, begging to be touched they are invitingly ergonomic. Warm materiality with neutral colour palettes that are punctuated with rich hues in blue and red, their objects make for very compatible relationships allowing for furnishing flexibility. Take the ‘Tobi-Ishi’ table for example; perfect as a minimalist showstopper or just at home heavy with objet in a maximalist’s abode.

Although their furniture and objects read like an A-list of accomplishments they also find the time to support their other interests through ‘Map’ – industrial design and ‘Universal Design Studio’ – interior design and architecture. Humble and humorous to the core they have been noted as saying that their ‘Tab’ lamp for Flos is one of their favourite pieces due to it’s affordability, and therefore availability to the everyday people.

Credits: Barber & Osgerby

ALEX HOTEL BY ARENT&PYKE

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

Located within the cosmopolitan and developing cultural landscape of Northbridge in Perth is the Alex Hotel; a joyous collaboration between Perth-based architects Spaceagency, interior designers Arent&Pyke, and the hotel’s passionate founders.

Conceptualised as ‘Hotel as Home’, Alex Hotel is a place to find freedom, solace, intimacy and connectedness that is tailored to the individual; celebrating the stories they bring with them to the hotel. Always present is a longstanding understanding of the familiarity of ‘Alex’; a treasured old friend with a house full of wonderment who guides the guest through the hotel, welcoming them into their home. The interior design, furnishing and styling imagines the richness of that personality, with a sense of frivolity and the layering of a story.

The public spaces are bright, casual and lively, a reflection of the ethos of the Alex Hotel, representing a commitment to the daily rituals of our lives to rest, feed and nourish, in the morning and evening as its surfaces and spaces transform throughout the day. They also celebrate the act of coming together, yet the layered experience of furniture and furnishings provides us with solace if we so seek it. Seats are individually enveloping or bountifully communal. Tables are single scale to nest daintily beside us or vastly generous. The casual nature of ‘perching’ at bar surfaces brings a sense of comfort to the majority of the hotel’s guests; single travellers, while the multiple communal tables nurtures opportunities for communal interactions, recalling a familiar domestic typology and an invitation to serve one’s self, drawing guests to its vast surfaces and bountiful offering.

Entering the hotel, the foyer is unstructured yet not unclear, it’s front desk uncharacteristically turned 180 degrees to allow guests and staff to mill beside one another around a communal desk. Beside it, a black mohair velvet Swedish vintage loveseat welcomes guests, above it a large scale commissioned weaving by LA based, WA born artist Ben Barretto.

The ground floor cafe is dominated by a very large custom made shared dining table accompanied by a large communal banquette with three small lounging tables, a small coffee cart and three small café tables. Responding to the bold, almost industrial language of the architecture and the scale of the hotel’s spaces, the cafe mediates the compressed rigour of the hotel rooms and the dramatic release to generous communal spaces.

Defined in two zones, one, the mezzanine bar is wrapped on three sides by a double-height void, conceived as a single communal bar surface accompanied by an outdoor terrace and small lounge. The other, the mezzanine lounge, is conceived as a sitting space with dining and lounging accompanied by smaller outdoor terrace, and a library. Functionally responding to the requirements for a breakfast space for guests, it also transforms into a bar and casual dining space in the evening with an honesty bar system for an afternoon aperitif.

The Alex Hotel bedrooms are richly painted from floor to ceiling for an immersive experience of colour, a little room of respite; serene, yet invigorating. One single colour is rolled out across all rooms of each of the five levels of accommodation – from dusty pink, to mustard, deep navy, sage green and dirty lilac, each with a contrasting hallway colour. Rigorously planned by Spaceagency, Arent&Pyke have furnished the rooms with a bespoke plywood and quilted bedhead upholstered in Dior maestro Raf Simons’ collection of fabrics for Kvadrat. Each is modestly accompanied by a custom made black steel hanging rail, hanging mirror, a linen and leather utility bag and a plywood storage seat lovingly manufactured  by New Zealand based father/daughter duo Douglas & Bec.

The roof terrace invites guests to enjoy the sunsets over the CBD from the comforts of custom daybeds and loungers while the conference/function room offers a relaxed atmosphere, its billowing linen curtains floating softly in the breeze revealing the beauty of the sun-drenched Perth skyline.

Comprised of a layered palette of bespoke joinery pieces in birch plywood, bold marble and terrazzo responds to the rigours of the architecture, with an honest, utilitarian sense of surface. Softened by bespoke upholstery, textural and layered tonal fabrics, iconic furniture pieces and ambient lighting, with a sophisticated collection artworks from Artbank, the Alex Hotel invites all in to experience its joys.

Credits:
Interior Design: Arent&Pyke

Architecture: Spaceagency
Photography: Anson Smart

Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

In/Out: Mimi Jung

Not long ago we looked at the exhibition ‘Wall Hangings’ at Copenhagen gallery ‘Les Gen Heureux’. Today we delve a little deeper into the work of one of the artists, Mimi Jung, whose work is particularly alluring with its soft and rich colours, seemingly organic compositions yet meticulously crafted. Jung’s work is also two things at once: familiar in the sense of traditional techniques and entirely new in what she does with them, an aesthetic that combines old and new.

Jung studied fine art at Cooper Union in New York and graphic design at HGK Basel, where art and design practices influenced Jung’s practice so taking her weavings far beyond the realm of craft-making. Jung is not, and perhaps least, interested in technique (though her skill level is obviously at the highest level) but more interested in ideas.

Abstractions and landscapes, or something between the two where blocks of puffy wool jut out of delicate, intricate cross-hatched lines, or simple plain weave structures with long draping layers of tufting, and sometimes just exposed warp. There are flat pieces and three-dimensional sculptures, pieces that hang on the wall and stand free creating spaces.

For Jung, the process is varied, one piece pre-planned the other completely freestyled. “I like to mix it up”, she says, “If I’m doing a large scale weaving then it’s important to have a general idea of the composition sine each section will take days to finish. For the smaller weavings most of the time I like to keep it open and let the process lead the way.”

Perhaps Jung’s success comes down to her laid back approach, seeing weaving as comparable to meditating and letting the finished product emerge naturally. “I have a general idea of where to take the design of the weaving, but since each weft takes a tremendous amount of time and patience, I can’t really get ahead of myself. It’s best to zone out and remain peaceful until I get to my next color block.”

Credits: Mimi Jung

Hôtel Vernet

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

On its 100-year anniversary, originally built under the French civic planning of Georges-Eugène Haussmann, the historic Hôtel Vernet hotel has undergone a significant renovation by interior designer François Champsaur and it’s an absolute work of art.

Taking the old building, which sits between the Place de l’Etoile (Charles de Gaulle) and the prestigious Golden Triangle district, the French designer has created a space of elegance and artistry, boasting in equal measure the modern aesthetic and French sophistication. It’s a combination that, while not new to the designer having worked on various luxurious hotels and a number of homes of art collectors’, is done with great skill. Bold colours are used in a way that complement perfectly the decadence of rich materials while energetic patterns sit comfortably with fine lines.

Each detail – whether it be furniture or fittings, paint colours or floors – speaks somehow to both modern art and French elegance at once. Art in the obvious sense, that is, paintings, are not only on the walls but also find expression on the floors in the form of simply fabulous rugs, becoming art works in themselves, and are found also on the ceilings (with fresco by French visual artist Jean-Michel Alberola commissioned). The furniture is wholly modern with its minimal form but elegant in material and the choice of colours are bright yet not gaudy, contemporary while also oozing class. The copper bar feels fresh but sleek, while marble table-tops oscillate between simple geometric shapes and sinuous curves which defy their very materiality. Of course, we cannot forget the monumental stained glass dome. Designed by Gustave Eiffel, the impressive glasswork is certainly a generous nod to French workmanship and classic design, but, as it hovers over a very minimal dining area, nestles itself into the modern tone.

All in all, the Hotel Vernet blends two distinct eras and aesthetics together beautifully, paying respect to both and being something truly unique in its own right.

Credits: Hôtel Vernet via Yatzer

Lyn&Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out - 2 By LynandTony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out: Lyn and Tony

In/Out - 2 By LynandTony

In/Out - 2 By LynandTony

In/Out - 2 By LynandTony

In/Out - 2 By LynandTony

In/Out - 2 By LynandTony

In/Out - 2 By LynandTony

Australian materials are often seen as weather worn, crude, even second rate to European or American ones; a hangover from colonial days gone by perhaps? Lyn Balzer and Tony Perkins of Lyn&Tony confront this psyche with their sensitive jewellery and objects. Manipulating kangaroo leather and native semi-precious stones into exquisite adornments that are appreciated globally but are most importantly; an awakening to what materials Australian designers have to call their own.

Partners in life and in work, Balzer & Perkins are multi-diciplinarians in object design, photography and installation design, falling into jewellery design by chance. While artistically directing a fashion show they produced some tactile ornaments to complement the garments, and ‘2 by Lyn&Tony’ was born.

Recently showing at the Australian Design Centre late last year Scented Intoxication exhibited the breath of Balzer & Perkins’ talents from photography, installation and jewellery design intertwined with their continuing explorations into perceptions of scent.

Since developing two candles with Maison Balzac – Obscurite (Darkness), inspired by the scent of black rocks warming in the sun by the ocean and Etrangete (Strangeness) inspired by the scent of a favourite rainforest waterfall near Byron Bay – the pair have been (what they call) “scenting everything”. ‘Scented Intoxication’ was a further development into Balzer & Perkins’ wonder and obsession with nature; its textures, weights and smells while exploring what happens when different materials come to meet each other in various stages of their natural life cycles.

Meditating on the plasticity of materiality, as always plaited, woven, cuffed and polished these objects are beacons of what the Australian environment is capable of if we only took the time that Lyn&Tony take to truly bask in its beauty.

Credits: Lyn&Tony and Subject Matter

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