OUT/ABOUT: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

5_scorpios

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

2_scorpios

 

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

Perched on a ridge between Kavos and Paraga Beach, Scorpios Mykonos blends into the landscape perfectly – almost as if it were carved straight from the earth, a little honey-coloured village made entirely of rock and clay. From deck chair to exterior wall, the retreat successfully reflects its immediate landscape: warm tones, dusty textures and organic forms.

Eager to provide a full experience of Mykonos, Mario Hertel and Thomas Heyne, turned to the history of Ancient Greece, in particular, the agora. Literally meaning ‘a gathering space’, an agora was traditionally used as the meeting point for ‘the athletic, artistic, spiritual and political – the Community’. Here, they’ve translated this concept into a day retreat, beach club, bar and restaurant that is both social and relaxing, where time slows right down – almost to a stop – and lets you escape the world. The sense of full immersion into relaxation is extremely alluring.

Building on nearby hotel San Giorgio Mykonos, architects Dimitiris and Konstantinos Karampatakis of K-studio, Athens, Scorpios is conceived as meandering collection of indoor and outdoor spaces from beach front, to beach terrace, to restaurant and finally, inside ‘the house’. Divided as such, the retreat is generously proportioned, offering numerous spots to escape to. Read a book in the under the shade of the thatched cabanas, enjoy (multiple) morning coffees with friends in the eastern terraces, or have cocktails in the evening at the club-house with your love – there is somewhere for everyone, and every mood, to enjoy together or alone.

Scorpios Mykonos is wildly beautiful. Dappled sunlight and billowing fabrics, the contrast between textured stone walls and accents of white washed ones, heavy timber against delicate weaving, the calm that pours from natural tones throughout – it’s the kind of beauty that feels effortless, one the Greeks really do master. Between a pared back colour palette, natural, weather-worn materials of stone and warm timber, and the fine, elegant furnishings that fill the space, Scorpios Mykonos is part-1960s Greek glamour and part-contemporary modernism, oozing with richness in the most subtle way. Ultimately, it’s a space of ease, delightfully celebrating the local culture in the process.

Credits: Scorpios Mykonos

Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

In/Out: Roksanda Resort 2016

Roksanda Ilinic’s Resort 2016 collection takes inspiration from the Cubists; bold lines, broken lines, and geometric shapes find expression in each outfit – in one way or another, and the line as a whole is characterised by a sense of considered abstraction.

While it’s blocky patterns and oversized shapes (a giant circle across the bodice for example) that catch our attention first, from each piece leaps a strong sense of shape in the complete sense of the word. As well as the surface, it is the structure of these skirts and coats, trousers and dresses that shout Cubism.

Here, tops are rectangular and skirts look like triangles because fabric has been cut with absolute precision. Even the crisp curve of a circle gets a place. What’s most impressive about this very definite structure though, is the collection remains a flattering one. Roksanda obviously knows proportion – and the female body.

Of course, there is another star in this collection: colour. Tangerine and turquoise blue, pale pink against bright red, white on black – a touch of fuchsia. It is an inarguably playful palette, but it also retains sophistication. There are the darker pieces, rather wintry for a resort collection but by no means unwelcome, that create balance for the whole, and where there is colour it is considered at the same time it is celebrated. There is also texture at work, perhaps another nod to cubism, and fantastic use of contrast that gives the line its edge.

Between its bold sense of shape and playful use of colour, flattering structure and variety of materials, Roksanda’s Resort Collection 2016 is both art and fashion. Wear, or hang, it’s one that deserves to be admired.

Credits: Roksanda via Style

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson ‘Fixated’

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

It’s hard to remember our lives before the daily visual barrage from our computers, tablets and phones; with images from all around the world accessible at the flick of a switch. Equally we are able to construct an online identity shaped by the pictures we post and share. These ideas shape the framework for a new collection of paintings by Sydney-based artist James Ettelson.

Ettelson investigates contemporary culture, looking at the ways we are ‘fixated’ on technology, with consumption and production of often ‘picture perfect’ imagery. Although largely abstract, his canvases offer a few visual clues to these themes: a cross-legged girl in a swimming costume, palm trees and a posing cat emerge from these densely constructed paintings. The irony that Ettelson is choosing to comment on images that are usually fast and disposable while executing his own work with painstaking precision is not lost on the viewer.

There is something almost craft-like in his approach, he builds the compositions intuitively with a series of highly colourful patchwork sections. These fragments are made with a series of dashes and dots (that nod to Aboriginal Art) and anyone that has marveled at the master of pointillism, Georges Seurat, will enjoy this contemporary interpretation. The cheekily titled ‘Tinder Surprise’ also exposes the under-painting beneath his jewel-like surface. Arbitrary marks in acid neon aerosol provide a provocative counterpoint to the structured inscriptions on the surface.

Having only just turned thirty and with four solo exhibitions under his belt, this self-trained artist is definitely one to watch.

James Ettelson ‘Fixated’
Arthouse Gallery
66 McLachlan Ave
Darlinghurst NSW 2010
Tuesday – Friday: 9.30am – 6pm
Saturday: 10am – 5pm
Sunday – Monday: closed
Until 8th August 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artist James Ettelson and Arthouse Gallery
Words by Katrina Arent

Sophie Buhai Objects

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai ObjectIn/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

Objects – “Curated and Designed” is a compilation of absolute treasures fom LA’s Sophie Buhai. Her eye for extraordinary objects and fine furniture is exemplary – thumb indented glass bowls, marble caressed into form, and chairs poised with character – a balanced collection full of soul, handcrafted, considered, and delivered with pride.

An eclectic mix of vintage and modern laced with Buhai’s own striking jewellery – harmoniously just at home next to a double ended Ikebana vase than worn on a wrist. The pedigree is not the focus here, an the unknown wooden timber sculpture nestles with Nathalie Du Pasquier’s Memphis napkin rings, Buhai’s collection not about the name but about the inherent emotion and depth discovered in each object.

When you view her collection it’s like stumbling upon the most fabulous flea market. Behold the beauty.

Credits: Sophie Buhai

Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

In/Out: Maticevski Resort 2016

Folds, ruffles, bustles, pleats, splits and cascading volumes of fabric, this is Australian fashion designer Toni Maticevski’s Resort 2016. This collection is a parade where the body and garment dance together.

A beautifully restrained monochromatic palette glints with metallic brocade and geometric lace, Maticevski crafts in a structured almost mathematical way, every organic fall meticulously engineered. Perhaps it’s the influence of working alongside the Australian Ballet – with its peripheral male form, sense of feminine strength and fragility and elaborate cloth creations – that brings the energy of something deliciously dangerous.

Credits: Toni Maticevski via Style.com

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