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OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson 'Fixated'

It’s hard to remember our lives before the daily visual barrage from our computers, tablets and phones; with images from all around the world accessible at the flick of a switch. Equally we are able to construct an online identity shaped by the pictures we post and share. These ideas shape the framework for a new collection of paintings by Sydney-based artist James Ettelson.

Ettelson investigates contemporary culture, looking at the ways we are ‘fixated’ on technology, with consumption and production of often ‘picture perfect’ imagery. Although largely abstract, his canvases offer a few visual clues to these themes: a cross-legged girl in a swimming costume, palm trees and a posing cat emerge from these densely constructed paintings. The irony that Ettelson is choosing to comment on images that are usually fast and disposable while executing his own work with painstaking precision is not lost on the viewer.

There is something almost craft-like in his approach, he builds the compositions intuitively with a series of highly colourful patchwork sections. These fragments are made with a series of dashes and dots (that nod to Aboriginal Art) and anyone that has marveled at the master of pointillism, Georges Seurat, will enjoy this contemporary interpretation. The cheekily titled ‘Tinder Surprise’ also exposes the under-painting beneath his jewel-like surface. Arbitrary marks in acid neon aerosol provide a provocative counterpoint to the structured inscriptions on the surface.

Having only just turned thirty and with four solo exhibitions under his belt, this self-trained artist is definitely one to watch.

James Ettelson ‘Fixated’
Arthouse Gallery
66 McLachlan Ave
Darlinghurst NSW 2010
Tuesday – Friday: 9.30am – 6pm
Saturday: 10am – 5pm
Sunday – Monday: closed
Until 8th August 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artist James Ettelson and Arthouse Gallery
Words by Katrina Arent

OUT/ABOUT: James Ettelson ‘Fixated’

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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White 'A Beautiful Complication'

All the working (and non-working) mothers out there will appreciate the title of Edwina White’s most recent exhibition ‘A Beautiful Complication’. Finding out that she was pregnant after booking a solo exhibition on the other side of the world provided many challenges and fortunately just as much wonderful inspiration.

The Sydney-born, now New York based artist works primarily with paper and her compositions are the perfect balance of quirky collage and beautifully realized drawing. White’s ability to create plausible characters in her work has made her popular with regular contributions in high profile publications The New York Times, Vogue, The Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair and our own Sydney Morning Herald. Actually, many of the enchanting creatures you will find in this exhibition began their life as illustrations for news stories.

There is however a lovely autobiographical narrative that weaves through the work, it speaks of a life spent observing the eccentricities of life in a big city, of actors trying for their big breaks, of fabulous parties and couples courting. The genesis of the whimsical abstract works; so delicate and pretty, were created when she found out she was having her gorgeous daughter Frances but couldn’t tell anyone her exciting news.

Edwina is also celebrating the release of ‘Sembene’ at the Sydney Film Festival, a documentary on Ousmane Sembene the ‘father of African cinema’. ‘Sembene’ was an ambitious animation project many years in the making and gives us the opportunity to see her delightful drawings brought to life.

Edwina White ‘A Beautiful Complication’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday: 12-5
Tuesday-Friday: 10-6
Saturday: 10-5
Sunday: 12-5
Until 28th June 2015

Credits: Words by Katrina Arent
Images courtesy of the artist Edwina White and Olsen Irwin Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: Edwina White ‘A Beautiful Complication’

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

Nestled in Cradle Mountain/Lake St Clair National Park, in Tasmania, siting regally out on Lake St Clair sits ‘Pumphouse Point’. The hotel, is a whimsical gem of industry, repurposed as a contemplative retreat. Built in the 1930’s to house the water turbines for the State’s hydropower system, the exterior shell has been left as is. Weather beaten and lichen covered, it’s surface is a visual history of 85 years of industrial endurance.

The brainchild of tourism entrepreneur Simon Currant, ‘Pumphouse Point’ was realized with the help of Hobart & Launceston-based architect Peter Walker of Cumulus Studio. A second generation Taswegian Walker’s, affiliation with the treasured landscape of his homeland is evident in the design. Walker says, “From inception we envisaged that the Pumphouse Point redevelopment should encapsulate rugged simplicity and unrefined comfort”. This is an honest retreat for lovers of the vast outdoors.

‘Pumphouse Point’ consists of two buildings; The Pumphouse perched out on the lake, and The Shorehouse 250m inland both connected by a dramatically straight concrete pier. The 18 suites are bare bones cosy. Local Tasmanian Oak, wool carpet, wool felted blankets atop crisp white sheets are all you need. Exposed brass pipes pump pristine water into your monochromatic bathroom. Tranquil sanctuaries, the common spaces have combustion fires to warm your body as you stare out at the wonder of nature.

The original structures are off-form concrete, their recent incarnation embracing the industrial history engrained in the fabric of the buildings whilst being snug with creature comforts. A spectacular place of solace with a true frontier spirit!

Credits: Pumphouse Point
Photohgraphy by:
Adam John Gibson and Stuart Gibson 

OUT/ABOUT: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones 'Still Life'

Sydney artist Laura Jones‘Still Life’ paintings are a celebratory expression of life. It’s not just the subject matter that embodies this, but also the artist’s emotional interpretation in which she invites us to share with her the captivating joys around us all.

Jones’ bright blooms, bountiful foliage and exotic fruits burst forth with youthful vigor from their canvases. Rich in pattern and colour and styled with casual grace, they are free-spirited bouquets that uplift the soul. Gifts from the earth; dragon fruits, pineapples, orchids and gum blossoms, are offerings from Mother Nature at her best. The seasonal joy of Jones’ handpicked harvest of flowers is bighearted, abundantly festive yet at other times beautifully solitary. The backdrops are extensions of the bountiful sentiment; patch-worked colours, abstractions of space, or dense inky black, opening up or condensing our focus.

Working with hand-picked flowers, Jones’s time is limited to their lifespan, their detail depicted broadly so that all that remains is the true essence of their spirit. Her subject matter is ageless but her lashings of confident brushstrokes are completely contemporary.

As it is we are not alone in our admiration, this exhibition is a retrospective of Jones’ work since 2012. Laura Jones appetite for life is contagious, inviting us to capture the moment, to celebrate and to share its joys.

We have cherished Jones’ vivacity since interviewing her for a ‘Chat in a Chair’ back in 2013.

Laura Jones ‘Still Life’
Hawkesbury Regional Gallery
Deerubbin Centre
300 George St
Windsor, NSW
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 10-4
Saturday, Sunday: 10-3
Until 24th May 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artist Laura Jones and Hawkesbury Regional Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: Laura Jones ‘Still Life’

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse 'Tempo Polveroso'

‘Tempo Polveroso’ is a new body of work by Belgian photographer Frederik Vercruysse dreamed up within the serenity of an ‘artist in residency’ program at the Villa Lena in Tuscany.

Currently in exhibition at the iconic store, restaurant, hotel space, Graanmarkt 13 in Antwerp, Vercruysse’s 16 photographs are a clouded abstraction of the quintessentially romantic ideals of the Italian countryside.

Devoid of all human presence, the very core of the italian landscape of marble is at once cinematic in it’s grandeur, yet melancholic in its reality. The ‘Tempo Polveroso’ or ‘Pulverised Time’ of Vercruysse’s capture transcends a comprehensible sense of scale, creating a unique vision of the landscape architecture of Tuscany. Eerily detached from a sense of reality and context, they are picturesque yet abstract, intimate yet monumental.

Exploring beyond the quarries and into the immediate surrounds of the Villa Lena, Vercruysse’s illusions of nature are free from context. Their detail is layered in mist and blurred or flared, infinitely poetic is a suspended dreamlike haze.

Credits: Courtesy of the Artist Frederik Vercruysse & Graanmarkt 13
With thanks to Lies Vangeel of VonYellow

OUT/ABOUT: Frederik Vercruysse ‘Tempo Polveroso’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

Julian Meagher in ‘Drinking with the other Sun’ and Anh Do in ‘Man’, now showing at Sydney gallery Olsen Irwin present emotional portraits of men in a raw, yet endearing way, their subjects floating in white space, in paint on canvas. Meagher’s work is ephemeral and ghostly, his subjects reverent, fragile and blurred presences while Do’s men are physically arresting, thickly layered to command space beyond the confines of the canvas.

Sydney-based artist Julian Meagher’s exhibition, ‘Drinking with the other Sun’, is a collection of ethereal paintings layered with a recurrent exploration of the male figures pivotal to the artist, his understanding of masculinity, the evolution of Australia and the legacy of our history.

Although Meagher’s medium is oil on linen, it is his combination of precise linework combined with delicately controlled leaching and dripping that mimics the character of watercolours. It’s a technique that softens the features of faces, the gnarliness of flora and gives dimensional purity to the collections of glass objects.

‘Drinking with the other Sun’ explores the Australian identity by placing male figures that are personally connected or historically known alongside the native flora of Australia and that of our imperial motherland. The history of forefathers portrayed against the hardiness of the Banksia and contrasted with the iconic English Rose (at once delicate and prickly), metaphorically referencing British influence on our national identity. The stoic depiction of Australian masculinity is portrayed by Meagre as an exploration of vulnerability.

Portraits include those of the artist’s cousin Leighton whose father was a matador in the 1960s in Seville, as well as portraits of the great great grandsons of explorers William Wentworth and William Lawson, and the grandson of Sydney Harbour Bridge engineer John Bradfield. Meagher also includes a self-portrait in his father’s shirt.

Meagher comments; “As I’ve grown older I have become much more aware of how both personal and collective inherited history shapes our identity, especially in relation to contemporary Australian masculinity.”

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher 'Drinking with the other sun'

Anh Do‘s first solo exhibiton, ‘Man’, is a collection of densely painted portraits of friends of the artist, with creases and crevasses speaking of full lives touched by beauty and pain. Do, a well known comedian, actor, writer and television personality has found his solace in painting.

Complementing Meagher’s preoccupation with masculinity, Do explores the paradox of human nature, exploring that mysterious place of enlightenment behind our public facades and the emotional duality of men. As Do puts it, “I try to pick people if I think I can show the whole story in their faces… It’s very intuitive, I am just looking for those lines between the guy’s eyes or something in the mood he is giving off’.”

Rugged, deep furrows, with flyaway hair and craggy beards are decisively painted with confident brushstrokes, impasto style. Colour accentuates the intensity of Do’s masculine faces in ‘Man’ as they float on their canvases allowing for no distraction from the commanding yet almost familiar subjects.

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

In/out: Julian Meagher and Anh Do at Olsen Irwin Gallery

Julian Meagher ‘Drinking with the other Sun’ & Anh Do ‘Man’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road
Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday: 12-5
Tuesday-Friday: 10-6
Saturday: 10-5
Sunday: 12-5
Until 10th May 2015

Credits: Courtesy of the artists Julian Meagher and Anh Do and Olsen Irwin Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: Julian Meagher ‘Drinking with the other sun’ & Anh Do ‘Man’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Botanical Inquiry by Daniel Shipp

Sydneysider Daniel Shipp’s photographic exhibition ‘Botanical Inquiry’ is a carefully orchestrated arrangement of almost ikebana-like plants and flowers against cinematic backdrops of our cityscapes that are full of drama. Working with vegetation sourced from the streets of Sydney, Shipp hones in to amplify the small natural wonders often overlooked in the hustle and bustle of the everyday.

Playing on scale, Shipp creates an insect-like perspective. We are made to imagine him digging himself into the ground in order to access this viewpoint. With the looming dip of a stem, plants lose their delicateness and become towering, textural structures, beautifully sinuous in form, speaking of the survival of the fittest. The built environment is hazy, solitary and haunting, yet almost insignificant against the drama of plant life, a reminder of the true order of things.

‘Botanical Inquiry’ is fuelled by Shipp’s relentless curiosity of the interaction with and simultaneous existence of the built and the natural environments.

Daniel Shipp ‘Botanical Inquiry’
Saint Cloche Gallery
37 Macdonald Street
Paddington NSW
Monday – Friday: 8am – 4pm
Saturday – Sunday: 8am – 5pm
Until May 3rd

Credits: Courtesy of the Artist & Saint Cloche Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: DANIEL SHIPP ‘BOTANICAL INQUIRY’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Out/About: John Bokor 'Close to Home'

Australian artist John Bokor’s still lifes and landscapes from his exhibition, ‘Close to Home’, speak of spiritual connection to his everyday. Lounge rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, teapots, vases and bottles of Panadol are lovingly brushed onto canvas – a snapshot of contentment with living.

Cluttered and homely, his paintings are filled with objects, all bumping into one another in a friendly manner, joyously haphazard. Confident but slightly careless brushstrokes are visually intact but dreamy, creating a fuzziness of movement like a shifting gaze.

Colours are over intensified, connecting with the viewer on an emotional level. Purples, oranges, royal blue and all the hues of pink permeate Bokor’s poetic vision of life. Celebrations of the mundane, Boker’s painting are far from ordinary.

John Bokor ‘Close to Home’
King Street Gallery
177 William Street
Darlinghurst 2010 NSW
Tuesday – Saturday: 10-6
Until 2nd May 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and King Street Gallery

Out/About: John Bokor ‘Close to Home’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

Arthouse Gallery’s ‘In The Still’ groupshow explores the idea of the still life through the eyes of twelve contemporary Australian artists. Diverse in materiality and application, from large scale floral single blooms to 3D compositions, the essence of the everyday or the moment, is always present.

Craig Waddell’s intimate paintings of tactile blooms are almost scientific in their botanist dialogue. Miranda Skoczek‘s vivid colourscapes ground and isolate one object while others ghost in the background, part dreamscape, part consciousness. Laura Jones‘ paintings are more traditional yet informal and celebratory with their lurid textiles, bright blooms and festive fodder. Leah Fraser’s condensed imagery is fanciful, a collision of flora and fauna, decoratively wild and free. Kirra Jamison’s floral impressions are visual imprints, like firecrackers when you close your eyes. Claudia Damichi’s ikebana-inspired portrait is laced with symbols like a graphic equation to the organic structure. While Heidi Yardley’s split-natured compositions from yesteryear, smudged and soft, are reminiscent of black and white photos of 1950’s Hollywood beauties.

‘In The Still’ is a collection of bountiful jaunty combinations of the actual versus the abstract.

‘In the Still’ Group Show
Arthouse Gallery
66 McLachlan Avenue
Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011
Tuesday – Friday: 9.30am – 6.00pm
Saturday 10.00am: 5.00pm
Sunday – Monday: Closed
Until 21st March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Arthouse Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: ‘IN THE STILL’ GROUP SHOW

In/Out: Christian Liaigre Showroom Paris

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

 

Parisian design royalty Christian Liaigre along with Saint-Germain-des-Prés-based antiquities dealer and interior designer Florence Lopez, have theatrically co-curated part of Liaigre’s flagship showroom in the 7th arrondisement creating an exotic, sultry salon.

Awash in hand-brushed emerald greens, teals, and sea blues the lovingly furnished room is a tribute of professional respect between the classic contemporalist and the diverse design hunter of vintage objets d’art. An ongoing engagement, this will be an active evolutionary stage as furniture and accessories are sold then replenished.

Credits: Remodelista,Fashion Sphinx

CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE & FLORENCE LOPEZ

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