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Out/About

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: 'In the Still'

Arthouse Gallery’s ‘In The Still’ groupshow explores the idea of the still life through the eyes of twelve contemporary Australian artists. Diverse in materiality and application, from large scale floral single blooms to 3D compositions, the essence of the everyday or the moment, is always present.

Craig Waddell’s intimate paintings of tactile blooms are almost scientific in their botanist dialogue. Miranda Skoczek‘s vivid colourscapes ground and isolate one object while others ghost in the background, part dreamscape, part consciousness. Laura Jones‘ paintings are more traditional yet informal and celebratory with their lurid textiles, bright blooms and festive fodder. Leah Fraser’s condensed imagery is fanciful, a collision of flora and fauna, decoratively wild and free. Kirra Jamison’s floral impressions are visual imprints, like firecrackers when you close your eyes. Claudia Damichi’s ikebana-inspired portrait is laced with symbols like a graphic equation to the organic structure. While Heidi Yardley’s split-natured compositions from yesteryear, smudged and soft, are reminiscent of black and white photos of 1950’s Hollywood beauties.

‘In The Still’ is a collection of bountiful jaunty combinations of the actual versus the abstract.

‘In the Still’ Group Show
Arthouse Gallery
66 McLachlan Avenue
Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011
Tuesday – Friday: 9.30am – 6.00pm
Saturday 10.00am: 5.00pm
Sunday – Monday: Closed
Until 21st March 2015

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Arthouse Gallery

OUT/ABOUT: ‘IN THE STILL’ GROUP SHOW

In/Out: Christian Liaigre Showroom Paris

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE NEW SHOWROOM PARIS

 

Parisian design royalty Christian Liaigre along with Saint-Germain-des-Prés-based antiquities dealer and interior designer Florence Lopez, have theatrically co-curated part of Liaigre’s flagship showroom in the 7th arrondisement creating an exotic, sultry salon.

Awash in hand-brushed emerald greens, teals, and sea blues the lovingly furnished room is a tribute of professional respect between the classic contemporalist and the diverse design hunter of vintage objets d’art. An ongoing engagement, this will be an active evolutionary stage as furniture and accessories are sold then replenished.

Credits: Remodelista,Fashion Sphinx

CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE & FLORENCE LOPEZ

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

In/Out: OUT/ABOUT: Felix Forest 'Chernobyl'

Felix Forest’s ‘Chernobyl’ is a haunting realisation of Forest’s teenage dream to visit the eroded, decayed city; built, then abandoned after the world’s worst nuclear disaster. Shot last May after a last minute opportunity arose when Forest was working in Paris, his visit was as fragile as the political situation at the time, the Ukrainian war raging on and Kiev literally up in flames.

The clarity with which Forest’s experience of ‘Chernobyl’ is documented, the delicately balanced compositions and the sense of order in the symmetry imbues the devastation with an unexpected calm. The perspective of Forest’s work is vast yet intimate, dramatic yet serene, a poetic balance when all images are viewed together. The intimacy of the almost domestic scale crops, where one feels that someone has just left the room, is complemented with the comprehension of the almost 30 year abandonment in the broader perspectives of the public spaces. There is a crisp reality, a heartbreakingly beautiful tactility, yet there is a sense of composure to the abandonment. Vivid greenery creeps in, a peripheral acknowledgment of hope. The palette of tranquil mossy greens with harsh slaps of red highlight the dichotomy of emotional experience.

Forest says, “My focus was always on taking photograph in the exclusion zones and I was so focused before I got there that I forgot about the experience side of the journey. It soon caught up with me. On our way to Chernobyl, there were a lot of militias and military road blockages and as soon as we arrived a thunderstorm started… The ambiance was so dramatic and infectious, I was the only ‘tourist’ in the zone as the political climate wouldn’t have been appealing to most people. My guide (you have to get permits through the Chernobyl agency to go there and are constantly escorted by a guide and watched by militaries) has been working in Chernobyl for 14 years, first as a worker and then as a guide. His knowledge of the zone was very extensive and we had planned our expedition as precisely as possible to minimise my exposure to radiation.”

The emotional weight of Forest’s ‘Chernobyl’ is hard to take, yet the experience of such delicate, considered beauty in the abandonment resonates deep within.

Felix Forest ‘Chernobyl’
Becker Minty
Shop 7, 81 Macleay Street
Potts Point NSW
Open 7 days 10:30am – 6pm

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Becker Minty

OUT/ABOUT: FELIX FOREST ‘CHERNOBYL’

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

It is that time of year where we savour the delights of Maison&Objet Paris and bring you just a few of the many treasures, freshly handpicked by Arent&Pyke 2015 just for you!

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

One of our favourite Danish companies, Menu and their classic ‘Afternoon’ lounge chair in black and tan. With hints of the Thonet Corbusier, the ‘Afternoon’ has a restrained, contemporary twist.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Gam Fratesi‘s sublime ‘Karui’ (Japanese for ‘soft and light’) trays, for Swedish Skultuna. With soft leather interior bases and spun brass casings, they just as their name suggests.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Menu takes simple forms to create little pieces of magic like the ‘Bougeoir Optical’.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Czech brand, Brokis and their ‘Muffin’ lamp. It may not be new to the scene, but we love the new Nordic white washed finish.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Michael Anastassiades‘ minimalist shelf, ‘Étagère Square’ in marble and stainless steel, for French brand Coedition is an example of pure architectural engineering.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Ligne Roset comes up trumps with Brazilian designer René Barba’s ‘Lampes à poser’ paper lamp. Made from a blend of polyamide and polyester this tear-proof fabric creates a soft geometric diffused light.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

The glossy ‘Container’, from German brand Pulpo by Sebastian Herkner, in rose and gold topped with royal blue lids are versatile in size and make perfect shelf highlights.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Jaime Hayon does it again with his ‘Titus’ vases for Italian brand Paola C. Roman. Suggestive of ancient day vessels, in rose petal pink, deep sage and blue grey, these vases are true beauties.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

The ‘Oda’ Lamp also by Sebastian Herkner for Pulpo has a weightlessness, like a lantern about to take flight.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Superstar Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Luna’ Cabinet for French brand Coedition has personality plus. We feel like this may be the answer to todays apéritif bar.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

In colour saturated transparents, Christophe Pillet’s ‘Ilia’ tables are divine little sidekicks.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

The soft graphic patterns in ‘Marius’, handtufted in cotton, make for a refreshing look from French designer Ines de La Fressange.

 

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Another Danish favourite Ferm Living, bring us ‘Collect’ vases. Quiet achievers, they are dusty matte tactile surfaces.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Too cool Studio Pool brings us the ‘Circle’ Chair by Remi Bouhaniche in many flavoursome colours.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Iittala’s ‘Ruutu’ vases, with their diamond shapes, overlap and layer creating glass sculptural optical delights.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Cinna also got some Remi Bouhaniche talent when he designed the ‘Toa’ for them. A giant pillow of comfort perched atop its steel legs, it is just waiting for a weary body to cuddle.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Danish brand &Tradition brings us ‘True Colours’, a contemplative collection of material dialogues.

Credits: AD Magazine

OUT/ABOUT: MAISON&OBJET PARIS 2015

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

Sydney is in for yet another treat with the launch of Living Edge’s new showroom opening this week in the Woolstores, Alexandria. Previously, spread over two showrooms they’ve united to showcase the cache of treasures they are so known and loved for.

Ranging from the timeless classics of Herman Miller, Walter Knoll and Louis Poulsen to the future classics of e15, La Chance and Established&Sons, the showroom is a beautifully restrained, minimalist canvas for such exceptional talent. Designed by Woods Bagot, the space’s characteristic warehouse bones are celebrated yet its reincarnation is sleek.

On the ground floor, a series of dedicated platforms are offered up to each of the brands they represent. The brief was to; “create a series of mini environments… allowing each brand its own designated space using different materials and finishes to create a unique backdrop for their product”. A cosy e15 party incorporates one of our new favourites, the Enoki side table, while the Walter Knoll loungeroom with the Flow Chair and Grand Suite Sofa presides over the double height space.

The mezzanine is dedicated to Herman Miller’s “Living Office” concept. This enables the team at Living Edge to not only work within this environment, but to also offer a seductive testament to the end user of how function and form can unite in the workspace. As they put it; “It has completely changed our way of working and I think we’ll continue to see more benefits, not only in terms of the client interface but internally as well.”

The overarching concept is to showcase each of the Living Edge brands in their own dedicated space. It’s a move towards an exhibition-style showroom experience – our customers should feel as though they’re walking through the Milan Furniture Fair (without the hordes!). Each furniture ‘pod’ is designed to be true to the aesthetic of the brand it represents.

Tailored for the refined connoisseur looking for an Eames Classic Lounge & Ottoman, or the contemporary collector after La Chance’s Bolt Stool, Living Edge’s new Woolstore, Alexandria, showroom is now open.

Photo Credits: Living Edge

OUT/ABOUT: ‘Living Edge’ Showroom Launch

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

Number 11, Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa’s private residence in Colombo, is an eclectic lesson in refined taste. At once architecturally cultured and almost primitively executed, it is peppered with unexpected follies and exotic moments of the outside brought in.

Elegant and raw, tactile rendered walls meet glossy epoxied floors and heavy thick arched walls provide cool comfort. Intricate traditional carved timber doors and columns represent the abundant local craftsmanship. Peppered around the house are Bawa’s own furniture designs, prototypes for the pieces he designed for hotels and homes around the country and the world, a delicate combination of new vision and traditional materials. Meticulous attention to decorative detail are present in Bawa designed glass and brass wall sconce and sinuous cast wrought iron balustrade, which snakes from the ground floor up the tower to the roof terrace.

Sensitive to his tropical surroundings Bawa’s house is abundant in air and light. Areas are separated by gardens and courtyards so short courtyard exterior vistas are always present. Rustic stones inlaid in the floor or an impromptu stone bench are constant reminders of the relationship between the built environment and nature. It’s this perfect interior/exterior balance that creates such an idyllic tranquil gallery-esque home.

Alive with culture, his highly curated interiors include textile masterpieces by Ena de Silva and hand-painted doors by Australian artist Donald Friend (the originals of which can be found in the Art Gallery of New South Wales). Skillful at uniting the unlikely, religious artefacts preside over contemporary sculpture in a pastiche of exotic, vernacular, tribal and modern influences.

Recently visited by Arent&Pyke designer Dominique, the exotic enchantment and timelessness of Bawa’s own home is undeniably captivating. Bawa’s mix of Asian soul and European education is clearly expressed in his architectural and interior genius.

The doors of Bawa home are thrown open to visitors for accommodation and house tours.

Photography by: Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: Geoffrey Bawa’s House, Colombo Sri Lanka

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

Aaahhhhh welcome to ‘El Fenn’. Set in the heart of Marrakech this luxury retreat fully embraces the romantic artisan architecture and age-old crafts of Morocco. In a city littered with lively riads ‘El Fenn’ stands out from the crowd, thoughtfully engaging a traditional home with contemporary furniture and art.

When Vanessa Branson (yes sister of) and her business partner stumbled across this majestic but dilapidated home they knew that it was a gem too bright to keep to themselves. Respectfully restored and renovated, intricate metal and timber detailing is abundant, glorious stone and mosaic tiled floors are scattered with Berber rugs, ceilings are high and considered, and colour is BIG, oh so wonderfully BIG.

It’s been a progressive project that now includes 28 rooms, a massive roof terrace, rose gardens, numerous pools, a family of tortoises… are you getting the picture? Complementing the magnificent textural and visual architecture of this hotel is Branson’s private collection of artwork. Ranging from David Shrigley to Terence Donavan and Bridget Riley this is part gallery, part traveller’s haven.

‘El Fenn’, it’s only fitting for such a bewitching city!

Credits: El Fenn
Photography Credits: David Loftus, Joanna Vestey, Terry Munson

OUT/ABOUT: EL FENN HOTEL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotelv

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

Munich welcomes ‘The Flushing Meadows’ a new design hotel by three very savvy dudes. Gastronomist Niels Jäger and architects Sascha Arnold and Steffen Werner are no strangers to entertaining, with three other bars in Munich, guests have access to some of the hottest establishments in town.

Building within the top floors of a 1920s post office, they didn’t touch the institutional façade of the building, and managed to maintain the high ceiling in the 3rd floor loft rooms. Generous spaces – all individually developed in collaboration with an actress, musician, pro surfer, DJ and industrial furniture designer – these rooms have personality plus. Ranging from Nordic white minimalist into deep warm sage and dusty blush pinks, they are more like apartments than hotel rooms.

The penthouse studios are more classic in their styling, charcoal blues with highlights of sunshine yellow and hot pink. Carpet and upholstered walls embrace their guest, giving a sense of cosy luxury.

The common spaces are homely with plenty of layering, soft surfaces, Persian rugs, all complimented with honey natural timbers. The partners in this gregarious enterprise are all classics with copper tapware by Vola, Kvadrat fabrics, ClassiCon and Thonet furniture. Come in out of the cold and get cosy the rooftop bar is open till 2am!

Credits: The Flushing Meadows Hotel

Out/About: THE FLUSHING MEADOWS HOTEL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Château de la Resle

Wow! Dutchmen Johan Bouman and Pieter Franssen’s magnificent aesthetic is perfectly composed in their Burgundy hotel, ‘Château de la Resle’. Enthusiastic collectors of contemporary art and furniture, the new and old collide with poetic beauty in this 6-suite guesthouse.

The brilliance of this design is the commanding nature of the contemporary pieces against the majestic backdrop of such a robust old dame of a building. Original features like the marble fireplaces, intricate plasterwork, grand staircase and decorative timber paneling, are so striking in their level of craftsmanship that it only seems fitting to ensure their new companions are of the same ilk.

Roderick Vos’s kitchen dresser, heavy in black steel and timber, is a wonderful modern interpretation of a manor’s kitchen. While Patricia Urquiola’s bathware, ’Vieques’ for Agape is perfectly suited to this grandiose farmhouse.

Bouman and Franssen enlisted their favourite Dutch designers to create exclusive pieces for the hotel. The result was so successful that they have started their own ‘Chateau de la Resle’ label, so now we can all have a little piece of this design divinity.

Credits: Château de la Resle

Out/About: Château de la Resle

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Out/About: Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables 'Gathered in Spring'

Sydney based artist Robert Malherbe’s latest show ‘Gathered in Spring’ – a collection of still-life paintings – is soft and delicate in subject, and robust in delivery. Renowned for painting from life in real time, Malherbe’s hand is impulsive and confident.

Malherbe’s blooms exude life. Leaves curl and petals catch and reflect light. The minute is expressed with lush brush strokes. You can visually feel the weight of the rose’s head. Chrysanthemums, peonies and tulips are rich in colour against black backdrops, red table tops and swathes of graphic black and white striped cloth. Light refracts and bounces around and through glass vases.

Warm and full, it’s Malherbe’s tactile paint surfaces that steal you away to the very moment he painted these floral arrangements. Take some time out to stop by and smell the flowers.

‘Gathered in Spring’ also features the beautifully delicate ceramic works of Prue Venables.

Robert Malherbe and Prue Venables ‘Gathered in Spring’
Olsen Irwin Gallery
63 Jersey Road, Woollahra 2025 NSW
Monday 12pm – 5pm
Tuesday – Friday 1pm – 5pm
Saturday 1pm – 5pm
Sunday 12pm – 5pm
Until 20th December 2014

Credits: Images courtesy of the artist and Olsen Irwin Gallery

Out/About: Robert Malherbe & Prue Venables ‘Gathered in Spring’

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