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Out/About

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

OUT/ABOUT: CALDER & ABSTRACTION, FROM AVANT-GARDE TO ICONIC

In/Out - 'Calder & Abstraction: From Avant-Garde to Iconic'

The USA has featured regularly in Arent&Pyke’s travel destinations lately both for work and for play. Late last year designer Dominique visited New York City and enjoyed an in-depth house tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater. More recently Sarah-Jane took a 2 week sabbatical to LA and Palm Springs for Modernism Week and visited iconic and unforgettable architectural works scattered throughout the desert and the city.

While in LA, Sarah-Jane visited a truly captivating retrospective of works by Alexander Calder at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is all about light, curves, balance and shadows and it is as if Calder’s shapes have found a platform like no other than in the Frank Gehry-designed exhibition space.

It is all in the sense of trial and error, whimsical playfulness and precise construction for shapes and shadows, for balance and harmony which so fittingly marries the work of both Gehry and Calder. As one suspends in space, occupying volumes the other defines it. Amazingly Gehry has solved masterfully the issue of barricading the works with the illusion of giving the viewer a sense of unencumbered closeness by using fluid plinths and sinuous low steel railings. By using long curved expanses of muted grey walls with the sharp edges of white the visitor is drawn in to inspect the strong steel shapes, then pushed back to breath and to contemplate the weightless finesse of these truly iconic works.

Calder and Abstraction: From Avant-Garde to Iconic
Resnick Pavilion
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Until July 27 2014

Credits: Hyper Allergic LA Times

OUT/ABOUT: Calder & Abstraction, From Avant-Garde to Iconic

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

Iconic architecture makes your heart sing in a way like no other. No one forgets those treasured moments spent in buildings and spaces all around the world that enliven the senses, that move and inspire us to travel more, read, eat, dance and take a moment to just take it all in and breath.

In writing a list of places to visit in a lifetime, Fallingwater by Frank Lloyd Wright could be singled out as potentially the most iconic house. Over Christmas, our designer Dominique visited the house for an in-depth tour (which allowed photos to be taken inside the house!) and today we bring to you a small snippet of her own treasured goose-bumpy moments at Fallingwater.

Fallingwater is a house like no other, built over a waterfall in Bear Run in southwest Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands. Commissioned by the Kaufmann family from Pittsburgh, the house was built between 1936 and 1939 and was owned and used by the Kaufmann family until 1963, when it was entrusted by Edgar Kaufmann, jr., to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. To date (despite conservation works), everything inside the house remains as it was in 1963 despite receiving over 4.5 million visitors.

What perhaps is most enchanting about this house is its synonymous relationship with the environment in which it is found. Despite its assertively modern conception by Wright, it is so beautifully executed as the icon of Wright’s principles of ‘organic architecture’. The landscape of the whole Laurel Highlands is reflected, is celebrated in the house – the sinuous raw winter branches, the buttery yellow of the wheat fields, the orange of the leaves in the fall, the charcoal grey of the rolling hills late afternoon, the intense snowfalls and the long hot summers. It’s raw and it’s rugged, it’s pitching a tent in a storm, it’s seeking shade on a dangerously hot day – it’s the unmistakable sense of adventure that makes this house so truly unforgettable.

The colour palette is that of the landscape injected with the modernism of Wright’s signature Cherokee red for the steel work. Brass window hardware glints in the sun like the stream which runs underneath the building. The spines of locally quarried stacked stone are built as a stylised replication of the striations of the large natural rock shelves behind the house. The bathrooms and bedrooms are modest in scale and decoration yet meticulously detailed for moments of sheer joy such as a half arc cut out in a timber desk which allows a window to swing open (see below), to fireplaces seemingly organically carved up and out of the slate floor as if it was found that way.

It is only natural that we find ourselves captivated by the interiors of the house. Everything from the materials, to the custom designed built-in joinery (Wright’s method for mitigating a furniture fit out by his clients!) to the paint colours create a unified, rigourously yet entirely organic composition.

To our modern standards there is such austerity to the interior at face value yet in the space every single detail, every texture, every material feels so harmonious to the greater context of the building and the landscape. It is one big harmonious symphony of beauty, inspiration and delight and well worth the 3 days out of New York City to get lost in Wright’s masterpiece.

Credits: Photography by Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

In Out - Out/About: Jennifer Tyers, Tropical Gardens

Jennifer Tyers is an artist from Tasmania who is currently based in Borneo. With ‘Tropical Gardens’ surrounding her in abundance, the artist has captured a collection of 21 vibrantly paintable landscapes for this exhibition at Edwina Corlette Gallery in Brisbane.

One can vividly imagine donning a wide-brimmed straw hat and taking a long leisurely afternoon stroll or a plunge in the meandering rivers or a snooze under the shade of a palm tree in these intimate scenes of pure joy.

Jennifer Tyers ‘Tropicals Gardens’
Edwina Corlette Gallery
555 Brunswick Street, New Farm, Queensland 4005
Online exhibition catalogue can be viewed here

Credits: Edwina Corlette Gallery

Out/About: Jennifer Tyers ‘Tropical Gardens’

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

In/Out - Out/About: Laura Jones 'Light is Fugitive'

Like we need any excuse for a jaunt down to the Southern Highlands of NSW. Rolling hills, spindly wildflowers lining the roadside, bountiful fresh produce, nostalgic and vibrant villages serves up a rich dose of natural beauty for city folk. This weekend take a trip down to The Highlands to take in everything that is beautiful about the second solo exhibition by painter Laura Jones. Light is Fugitive is now showing at Gallery Ecosse in Exeter where the Sydney-based artist has put her roots down setting up both a studio and home.

It is no secret that Jones has worked as a florist and still finds herself on occasions working for Grandiflora – the greatest of floral wonderlands. Making the absolute most of the rambling gardens around her cottage, Jones started picking flowers and arranging them in her studio challenging herself to capture them before they began to wilt. The overflowing bountiful collections are forever immortalised in this collection of works, the show’s name Light is Fugitive taken from a quote from Margaret Preston, one of Jones’ greatest inspirations.

The light and colour of the ephemeral moments we find in nature reminds us of the constant changes of life. It is a breath of the freshest country air and a moment to stop and smell the roses and who doesn’t need that?

We enjoyed a Chat in a Chair with Laura Jones last year. Take a look here.

Credits: Laura Jones

Out/About: Laura Jones ‘Light is Fugitive’

In/Out - Out/About: New York City

In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
NYC
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
In/Out - Out/About: New York City
New York City in the holiday season is nothing short of dreamlike. Central Park covered in a thick white blanket of snow, West Village windows framed by blue spruce and fairy lights, skating rinks, crispy blue cloudless skies, long afternoons feasting and whimsical Christmas windows. It is something of a childhood dream to experience a white Christmas and NYC certainly did not disappoint.

Arent&Pyke designer Dominique spent a good part of 3 weeks wandering the city over the holidays with a short dalliance from the city to visit Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece ‘Fallingwater’ and the lesser known ‘Kentuck Knob’ in Pennsylvania – stay tuned for more.

Credits: Instagram by Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: NEW YORK CITY

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

In/Out - Out/About: Patricia Urquiola

We simply couldn’t let the year end without sharing one of it’s highlights. Last month as part of the 20th birthday celebrations for Space Furniture Sarah-Jane had the incredible opportunity to spend a morning with the ever incredible Patricia Urquiola. Urquiola’s work excites and inspires us endlessly, and it was such an honour and joy to spend some time “thinking with the hands” with her.

For a beautiful interview, see this post by our good friends at yellowtrace.

OUT/ABOUT: PATRICIA URQUIOLA

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There really is nothing finer than sitting down at a table with loved ones and sharing a meal together. Great life events are centred around the table. It is a place to share, to make, to do, to discover and to nurture. In this busy world of ours it is so very essential for our souls to enjoy small gatherings with like-minded individuals.

Kinfolk magazine founded in Portland in 2011 is a publication which celebrates intimate moments, artisan traditions, and the joy of sharing ideas. With a growing international community of artists, writers, designers, photographers, cooks and others who are interested, Kinfolk celebrates the very human need for small gatherings and for finding new things to make and do. The growing Kinfolk family now host an international series of dinners & workshop events with the signature (and highly infectious) Kinfolk aesthetic. It is the honesty and austerity, the simplicity and the humbleness that makes us all want to take a seat at the Kinfolk table.

Earlier this month, Community Director Julie Pointer and Business Manager Katie Searle-Williams came to Australia to host a weekend retreat in Patonga on the Central Coast of NSW and a Kinfolk Dinner Series at the incredible property Glenmore House on the outskirts of Sydney. We were lucky enough take a seat at the table thanks to a very generous invitation from Luisa Brimble who is the photographer behind many of our Chat in a Chairs. Luisa is undoubtedly the greatest ambassador for the Kinfolk community in Australia.

It was an evening of pure joy and we would love to take this opportunity to share the evening with you all through the images of Jonathan Wherrett & Tealily Photography, and of course Luisa Brimble.

Credits:
Image 1: Luisa Brimble
Images 2, 3, 7, 10, 13, 16, 17, 18: Jonathan Wherrett
Images: 4-6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15: Tealily Photography

OUT/ABOUT: KINFOLK DINNER SERIES

In/Out - Out/About: Hotel San Jose

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Arent&Pyke know the benefit of staying in a hotel and feeling truly at home. It is not about replicating home, but it is about nurturing our very human need for rest and relaxation, for adventure and inspiration. There is when holidaying, a supreme hope for calm, for private space, for familiar objects we can relate to. But this must be balanced with stimulation for the senses above and beyond that which we find in our own homes and in our day-to-day existences. In the Arent&Pyke studio we have been dreaming about the very nature of a home away from home…

A place that gets the balance just so is the Hotel San José, a boutique hotel in Austin, Texas. With its honesty, pure austerity, subtle texture and layered materials & surfaces, the San José has well and truly captured our imaginations. The hotel has been designed by San Antonio architecture firm Lake/Flato and is a beautiful example of how to capture the imagination of the guest by celebrating the palette and history of the hotel and its location. The very Texan minimalist style creates a unique voice that is proudly local and of its place. Exposed and sparsely painted hardwood timbers, handmade furniture, saddle leather chairs, vintage mexican style textiles and a variety of quaint mixed floral cottons sit comfortably beside the iconic contemporary mod cons of Malin & Goetz bath products, Tolomeo lamps, guest bicycles, kimono robes and pet-friendly holidaying. It is all about the layering and we love it.

Credits:
Hotel San José

OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL SAN JOSÉ

In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan

In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
In/Out - Out/About: Lucas Grogan
The simple and perfect post on The Design Files Instagram “Let’s get Married” a couple of weeks ago reminded me of the intricate beauty of Lucas Grogan’s work. Once I got past the jealousy of this wonderfully romantic gesture (made for The Design Files founder Lucy Feagins) I began to explore the impressive catalogue of work by this young, Melbourne based artist.

In keeping with his contemporaries, Grogan doesn’t limit himself to one medium preferring to explore the autobiographical material and cultural observations in his work using techniques as diverse as needlepoint to mural-scale installations. With the distinctive use of a circular base and a largely monotonal palette (currently in shades of blue) Grogan builds his composition with the repetition of shape and pattern. With complex linework and cross hatching it is easy to see where critics have had issue with Grogan, a non indigenous painter, having too close a connection with Aboriginal art. Grogan acknowledges that Aboriginal art has had an influence on his work but that it is one of many sources that he draws from. Perhaps the most fun are the derisive text excerpts incorporated into his paintings and quilts (taken from conversations, newspapers and social media) that cleverly reflect the way our current modes of communication are reduced to sound bites.

If you are in Melbourne there are two ways to see his work this week firstly by visiting The Design Files Oopen House or his most recent exhibition at Gallerysmith (until 14 December). The Design Files Open House opens in Sydney in early December.

Words by: Katrina Arent

‘Quilts’
Gallerysmith
170 – 174 Abbotsford St, North Melbourne
Friday 15 November – 14 December 2013

The Design Files Open House
Melbourne 21 – 24 November 2013
Sydney 5 – 8 December 2013

Credits: Lucas Grogan

OUT/ABOUT: LUCAS GROGAN

Personal Project ©2013 Gunther Hang All Rights Reserved

Personal Project ©2013 Gunther Hang All Rights Reserved

If you can see the benefits of introducing art into your home but are unsure where to start then this is the week to take the leap into the deep, dark and sometimes scary unknown.  Finally Sydney plays host to an appropriate art fair, one that reflects its rich cultural diversity and its vibrant contemporary arts scene.  Operating in Carriageworks, the former Eveleigh railyards, Sydney Contemporary opened with the vernaissage this Thursday (19 Sept) evening and runs through until Sunday (22 Sept).

Apart from the obvious advantage of having ninety galleries under one roof, the fair is also a far less intimidating atmosphere for the novice.  You can move in and out of several spaces in a couple of minutes (should the work not resonate with you) without fear of offending anyone.  With a wonderful mix of the best Australian commercial galleries as well as many international spaces you can also get a taste for what is happening on the global scene.  While some galleries will have a tightly curated show of one artist you will find that most galleries will opt for a mixed exhibition of works, this will allow you to get a real sense of whether the art is to your liking.

If you come across a work you connect with, talk to the gallery staff and find out whether they have other works available not on display, ask about the artist’s background and whether they may be exhibiting again soon, thus allowing you to see a larger body of work.  If you then decide to take the plunge most galleries will allow you to place a work ‘on hold’ for a limited time while you continue to wander; generally you can just leave your mobile number and should another punter want to purchase the work the gallery will call you first.

If you still feel at a loss, Sydney Contemporary offers a great range of guided tours, workshops and lectures, however numbers for these events are limited so you will have to visit the Sydney Contemporary website and register your interest.  Also keep your eye out for some of our earlier art features with Miranda Skoczek showing her beautiful works with the Edwina Corlette Gallery and Guy Maestri’s Hill End landscapes at Olsen Irwin.

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Personal Project ©2013 Gunther Hang All Rights Reserved

Syd Contemp 04_mini

Personal Project ©2013 Gunther Hang All Rights Reserved
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Personal Project ©2013 Gunther Hang All Rights Reserved

Credits: Installation view, Sydney Contemporary 13.
Photographer: Gunther Hang
Words by: Katrina Arent

OUT/ABOUT: SYDNEY CONTEMPORARY 2013

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