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In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

The walls are pink, the furniture is pink, the ceiling is pink, every thing is pink. I don’t know what to tell you, it’s a statement. – restauranteur Mourad Mazouz

Right in the heart of London sandwiched between Saville Row and Regent Street sits Sketch. A visionary dream conjured up by restauranteur Mourad Mazouz and chef Pierre Gagnaire has seen this 18th century building reinvented into a dynamic platform for food, art and music.

Every two years the main gallery restaurant space will be given to a different artist to create an installation they are given carte blanche to create. It’s an all-encompassing experience that can be enjoyed from the very comfortable confines of your dinner table.

The second installment, after Martin Creed’s 2012 installation, is a magical feasting boudoir of art and interiors created by Turner Prize winning artist David Shrigley and world acclaimed decorative architect India Mahdavi.

India Mahdavi’s monochromatic pink blush design with its plush overstuffed velvet banquettes and armchairs are delicious in stark contrast to David Shrigley’s satirical drawings that line the walls. Like little riddles Shrigley’s verbal expression also extends to the tableware. To top things off, all of the restaurtant staff are dressed by Richard Nicoll in futuristic grey boiler suits and shirt dresses.

Pass the rose petal martini please!

Credits: Sketch

OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

Danish architect Frederikke Aagaard has beautifully reinvigorated the Rungstedgaard Hotel near Copenhagen. By intertwining original detailing from this awe-inspiring 1917′s building with contemporary furniture and artwork Aagaard has created an elegant, timeless interior that emulates sophisticated indulgence.

Housed on a grand estate, the Rungstedgaard Hotel is a commanding manor that knows all about hospitality. Having flourished with A-list parties during the 1920s, its handsome bones have accommodated grand celebrations, solace and romance ever since.

Frederikke Aagaard has exquisitely curated modern design classics against the hotel’s generously graceful architecture. The Bouroullec Brothers’ Slow Chair by Vitra nuzzle together while on the other side of an ornate fireplace proudly sits Oscar Zieta’s Chippensteel Chair. Jamie Hayon’s Pina chairs for Magis are timelessly chic with Svenskt Tenn feature cushions paired up beautifully with Jenny Bäck’s Lean lamp.

A beautiful restrained collection of iconic treasures with a fresh palette of finishes, these good-looking interiors encourage hotel guests to sit back and enjoy all the spoils that the good life has to offer.

Credits: Frederikke Aagaard

OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

The Ham Yard Hotel is totally stuffed with plushness. It is a vibrant home-away-from-home just bursting with the signature British Kemp cool. Kit and Tim Kemp have gone all the way once again, to ensure that The Ham Yard is a memorable den for world-weary travellers.

Each one of its 91 rooms are about comfort and energy – inviting overstuffed armchairs beckon you to take time out, while electric combinations of colour and pattern thrill the senses. Lusciously dressed with rich, personable details suh as stacked coffee books, flowers in vases, rich tapestries and buoyant artworks give you the prim and proper sense of a everything you could want from a quintessentially English homestay.

It’s this delightful attention to materiality that defines the Kit Kemp signature. Handcrafted, robust ethnic textiles sit comfortably on traditional silhouettes and heavily buttoned upholstery. Strong timber legs ground fiery fabrics and wall-hangings ranging from Indian rural scenes, to lordy portraits, to the work our very own favourite Shilo Engelbrecht, delight the roving eye. Heavy draperies ensure that the visitor is well cocooned in their abode.

It’s a typically English sense of eccentricity that we know and love that allows the confidence to layer the conservative with the outlandish with such flair. Once again, Firmdale Hotels are at the top of their game. Where do I check in?

Credits: Firmdale Hotels

Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel
Oozing cool, the American Trade Hotel may have had its heyday in the 60’s and 70’s, but this smoking hot revival sets to rival that benchmark. Rich in historic character while still maintaining a contemporary homely feel, it’s not hard to imagine Picasso teaching Paloma how to sculpt a bird out of a leaf in the courtyard or Tilda Swinton sipping a Martini in the bar.

Originally built in 1917, the American Trade Building at 4 stories high was and still is, the tallest building in the old town of Panama City. Lucky if you’re a guest, as every room has a view over its charming neighbouring white-washed haciendas. We can almost feel the warm fragrant air waft in as you swing open the French doors to survey the panoramic surroundings. Taking a large lungful in, you kick off your shoes and pad across the ancient timber floorboards. Everything is how it should be as you flop onto your crisp white bed realizing that the old and the new meet with perfect clarity in this thoughtfully restrained interior.

What else would you expect from the the Ace Hotels crew. The American Trade Hotel is a heady mix of texture, colour, scale and details. Dark walnuts, rich colours and clean palettes are teemed up with local flora, Bertoia wire frames and Viennese rocking chairs. The layering is sumptuous and inviting, it just reeks of good times!

The American Trade Hotel has the feel that it very well could be the new hotbed of cultural and creative hustle and bustle.

Credits: Yatzer

Out/About: American Trade Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

Well its not often we’re speechless but this installation by designer Pierre Charpin in L’Appartement No.50 within Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse really takes your breath away. The exemplary balance between colour and the purest of palettes makes one’s heart sing.

L’Appartement No.50 is one of 337 apartments within Le Corbusier’s concrete dream for a utopian society. As you can image the bones of this building are blue blood modernist, the perfect backdrop to just about anything! Let it be said Pierre Charpin is not just anything. His design sensibility is so honest and intuitive, each piece surprising in it’s exploration of form and materiality. This is no roll-out design family, it is a thoughtful gathering of old friends that sit so comfortably together. Good humoured, robust and dependable, this is a gang you want to hang with.

Charpin has incorporated pieces by his predecessors such as Jasper Morrison, the Bouroullec Brothers and Konstantin Grcic with his own pieces into this domestic theatre. His ‘Playtime’ glass sculptures, ‘Oggetti Lenti’ vases sit and ‘Crescendo’ coffee table have blood ties back to the modernist movement while his suspended ceiling sculptures, ‘Mini Eclipse’ lamp, ‘Stump’ marble side table and ‘Desa’ floor lamp are true contemporaries.

His exquisitely measured layering of the 3D and 2D are heavenly and thanks to the hospitality of No.50’s resident Jean-Marc Drut – a true patron of the arts – this rare intimate gallery is open to the public during the summer months if you are lucky enough to find yourself in Marseille.

The fantasy of setting up a temporary home in the Cité Radieuse, to feel the history of radical and cultured thinking and know that you are following in the truest legacy of our built environment is nothing short of a dream.

Credits: Wallpaper & Yellowtrace

Out/About: Pierre Charpin’s L’Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

Bottoms up with these beauties! Exposed at this year’s Salone Internazionale Del Mobile in Milan, ‘Elements’ is the very ingenious union of J.Hill’s Standard and Scholten & Baijings. These stunning drinking vessels are sure to give breakfast in bed a cheeky spritz, or your next dinner party a new sense of elegance.

The brainchild behind J.Hill’s Standard is Anike Tyrrell a true visionary who is breathing life back into the Irish Waterford crystal industry. With one part ingenuity, a couple of traditional glass-blowing craftsmen and the collaborative mix-in of Dutch designers Scholten & Baijings, ‘Elements’ are the perfect receptacle for whatever drink takes your fancy. Tyrrell’s dream is not only to bring back the glory days of the glass craft, but also invigorate the industry with a glass blowing school for next gens. It’s big picture stuff and we like it.

In ‘Elements’, Scholten & Baijings have designed glassware that is exquisite in surface complexity yet beautifully humble in personality. In their own words, “the glass sizes are not prescriptive and suit a multitude of uses, from whiskey to wine to water”. They have amalgamated traditional patterns to fashion a new look book in glassware.

We are really looking forward to future collaborations between designers and J. Hill’s Standard (the pioneers of compounding glass to the superior production of crystal).

Credits: Scholten & Baijings, J.Hill’s Standard, Dezeen

OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 – ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico
If you are lucky enough to find yourself in Mexico City you might want to check into the Downtown Mexico for some beautiful bare bones luxury. The very talented Cherem Serrano Arquitectos cleverly converted this UNESCO world heritage site for Grupo Habita, into a wonderfully uplifting hotel with plenty of local cha cha.

The new additions are respectful to their host while still being a bit cheeky. Whilst the design maintains a minimal approach, materials such as terracotta breezeblocks add a rustic honest quality. No-fuss furniture in invigoratingly bright hues flirt with you. Rich earthy tones are offset by the vivid glossy white of bathroom tap ware and crisp bright linen. Abundant and green breezy patios and heavenly murals await weary travellers. The spatial volume of the common areas and rooms are lavish, allowing your mind to roam around in the history of your surroundings.

And… the hotel includes a hostel, Downtown Beds, which means that whether you’re down to your last peso or rolling in it, you can rest your weary head and enjoy a poolside margarita as you watch the locals go about their business in the old town.

Credits: Downtown Mexico

OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

Italian fashion house Marni have brought their ‘Animal House’ to life at this year’s Salone del Mobile Milan with a fruitful co-lab with a group of Columbian women striving for financial independence, who live in and around Iza in the rural Andean region. A carnival of creatures, donkeys, giraffes, ducks, flamingos, ostriches, rabbits and chickens strut their stuff while an audience of vibrantly woven chairs watch on.

With personality PLUS these handcrafted limited edition magnificent creatures are obviously South American by nature; bright and resourceful with a hint of piñata about them that would bring the party to any interior. The collection is playful with one armed chairs leaning into each other’s confidence, lazy sun lounges lolling about, tables in checkerboard configurations and jaunty rocking chairs whistling dixie. Oversized one off animals puffed up with importance hold court – this is a catwalk of sorts in full swing!

We applaud Marni for talking the talk and walking the walk with impeccable style as always. Keeping it real all proceeds go to Associazione Sogni, an Italian charity devoted to helping terminally ill children.

Credits: designboom

OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 – Marni’s ‘Animal House’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

Iconic architecture makes your heart sing in a way like no other. No one forgets those treasured moments spent in buildings and spaces all around the world that enliven the senses, that move and inspire us to travel more, read, eat, dance and take a moment to just take it all in and breath.

In writing a list of places to visit in a lifetime, Fallingwater by Frank Lloyd Wright could be singled out as potentially the most iconic house. Over Christmas, our designer Dominique visited the house for an in-depth tour (which allowed photos to be taken inside the house!) and today we bring to you a small snippet of her own treasured goose-bumpy moments at Fallingwater.

Fallingwater is a house like no other, built over a waterfall in Bear Run in southwest Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands. Commissioned by the Kaufmann family from Pittsburgh, the house was built between 1936 and 1939 and was owned and used by the Kaufmann family until 1963, when it was entrusted by Edgar Kaufmann, jr., to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. To date (despite conservation works), everything inside the house remains as it was in 1963 despite receiving over 4.5 million visitors.

What perhaps is most enchanting about this house is its synonymous relationship with the environment in which it is found. Despite its assertively modern conception by Wright, it is so beautifully executed as the icon of Wright’s principles of ‘organic architecture’. The landscape of the whole Laurel Highlands is reflected, is celebrated in the house – the sinuous raw winter branches, the buttery yellow of the wheat fields, the orange of the leaves in the fall, the charcoal grey of the rolling hills late afternoon, the intense snowfalls and the long hot summers. It’s raw and it’s rugged, it’s pitching a tent in a storm, it’s seeking shade on a dangerously hot day – it’s the unmistakable sense of adventure that makes this house so truly unforgettable.

The colour palette is that of the landscape injected with the modernism of Wright’s signature Cherokee red for the steel work. Brass window hardware glints in the sun like the stream which runs underneath the building. The spines of locally quarried stacked stone are built as a stylised replication of the striations of the large natural rock shelves behind the house. The bathrooms and bedrooms are modest in scale and decoration yet meticulously detailed for moments of sheer joy such as a half arc cut out in a timber desk which allows a window to swing open (see below), to fireplaces seemingly organically carved up and out of the slate floor as if it was found that way.

It is only natural that we find ourselves captivated by the interiors of the house. Everything from the materials, to the custom designed built-in joinery (Wright’s method for mitigating a furniture fit out by his clients!) to the paint colours create a unified, rigourously yet entirely organic composition.

To our modern standards there is such austerity to the interior at face value yet in the space every single detail, every texture, every material feels so harmonious to the greater context of the building and the landscape. It is one big harmonious symphony of beauty, inspiration and delight and well worth the 3 days out of New York City to get lost in Wright’s masterpiece.

Credits: Photography by Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘Fallingwater’

In/Out - John Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein House

In/Out - John Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein House

In/Out - John Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein House

In/Out - John Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein House

In/Out - John Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein House

In/Out - John Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein House

Modernism Week kicks off its annual celebration of mid-century Modernist architecture, interiors, furniture and lifestyle throughout California from the 13th February. Sarah-Jane will be hotfooting it over to Palm Springs and Los Angeles to visit significant pieces of architecture that have inspired the way we live in an our homes and love them today. Derived from the International and Bauhaus movements of the very same era, American mid-century Modernism evolved into its own style influenced by the environment resulting in less formal and more organic designs.

Pre-empting the start of Modernism Week, we thought we would share with you one of the houses that will be part of Sarah-Jane’s tour. The Sheats-Goldstein House is one of American architect John Lautner’s most famous homes and you may recognise it from several movies and music videos. Lautner, a student of Frank Lloyd Wright was inspired by Wright’s principles of American Organic Architecture and as such the house is conceived from the inside out and is built into the sandstone ledge of the hillside; a cave-like dwelling that opens to embrace nature and view. Like Wright, Lautner designed not only the house, but extensively detailed the interiors, windows, lighting, rugs, furniture, and operable features. The holistic experience of the materiality of the interior elements and the sense of shelter despite the blurred lines between inside and out invoke a harmonious celebration of the senses. The Sheats-Golstein Residence represented an iconic vision for a home that is uniformly of it’s place functioning wholly unto itself in nature and a celebration of the individual accomplishments of mankind.

The Sheats/Goldstein residence continues to be a work in progress for Lautner, with construction beginning in 1963 and continuing today despite his passing in 1994.

Credits: John Lautner Foundation
1: homedit
2: Youonlyliveonce.com.au
3 & 4: homedit, DesignBoom
5: LA Observed
6 & 7: I know, right?, Faustian Urge
Video: Vimeo

JOHN LAUTNER’S SHEATS-GOLDSTEIN HOUSE

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