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In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

Number 11, Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa’s private residence in Colombo, is an eclectic lesson in refined taste. At once architecturally cultured and almost primitively executed, it is peppered with unexpected follies and exotic moments of the outside brought in.

Elegant and raw, tactile rendered walls meet glossy epoxied floors and heavy thick arched walls provide cool comfort. Intricate traditional carved timber doors and columns represent the abundant local craftsmanship. Peppered around the house are Bawa’s own furniture designs, prototypes for the pieces he designed for hotels and homes around the country and the world, a delicate combination of new vision and traditional materials. Meticulous attention to decorative detail are present in Bawa designed glass and brass wall sconce and sinuous cast wrought iron balustrade, which snakes from the ground floor up the tower to the roof terrace.

Sensitive to his tropical surroundings Bawa’s house is abundant in air and light. Areas are separated by gardens and courtyards so short courtyard exterior vistas are always present. Rustic stones inlaid in the floor or an impromptu stone bench are constant reminders of the relationship between the built environment and nature. It’s this perfect interior/exterior balance that creates such an idyllic tranquil gallery-esque home.

Alive with culture, his highly curated interiors include textile masterpieces by Ena de Silva and hand-painted doors by Australian artist Donald Friend (the originals of which can be found in the Art Gallery of New South Wales). Skillful at uniting the unlikely, religious artefacts preside over contemporary sculpture in a pastiche of exotic, vernacular, tribal and modern influences.

Recently visited by Arent&Pyke designer Dominique, the exotic enchantment and timelessness of Bawa’s own home is undeniably captivating. Bawa’s mix of Asian soul and European education is clearly expressed in his architectural and interior genius.

The doors of Bawa home are thrown open to visitors for accommodation and house tours.

Photography by: Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: Geoffrey Bawa’s House, Colombo Sri Lanka

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

Aaahhhhh welcome to ‘El Fenn’. Set in the heart of Marrakech this luxury retreat fully embraces the romantic artisan architecture and age-old crafts of Morocco. In a city littered with lively riads ‘El Fenn’ stands out from the crowd, thoughtfully engaging a traditional home with contemporary furniture and art.

When Vanessa Branson (yes sister of) and her business partner stumbled across this majestic but dilapidated home they knew that it was a gem too bright to keep to themselves. Respectfully restored and renovated, intricate metal and timber detailing is abundant, glorious stone and mosaic tiled floors are scattered with Berber rugs, ceilings are high and considered, and colour is BIG, oh so wonderfully BIG.

It’s been a progressive project that now includes 28 rooms, a massive roof terrace, rose gardens, numerous pools, a family of tortoises… are you getting the picture? Complementing the magnificent textural and visual architecture of this hotel is Branson’s private collection of artwork. Ranging from David Shrigley to Terence Donavan and Bridget Riley this is part gallery, part traveller’s haven.

‘El Fenn’, it’s only fitting for such a bewitching city!

Credits: El Fenn
Photography Credits: David Loftus, Joanna Vestey, Terry Munson

OUT/ABOUT: EL FENN HOTEL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotelv

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Flushing Meadows Hotel

Munich welcomes ‘The Flushing Meadows’ a new design hotel by three very savvy dudes. Gastronomist Niels Jäger and architects Sascha Arnold and Steffen Werner are no strangers to entertaining, with three other bars in Munich, guests have access to some of the hottest establishments in town.

Building within the top floors of a 1920s post office, they didn’t touch the institutional façade of the building, and managed to maintain the high ceiling in the 3rd floor loft rooms. Generous spaces – all individually developed in collaboration with an actress, musician, pro surfer, DJ and industrial furniture designer – these rooms have personality plus. Ranging from Nordic white minimalist into deep warm sage and dusty blush pinks, they are more like apartments than hotel rooms.

The penthouse studios are more classic in their styling, charcoal blues with highlights of sunshine yellow and hot pink. Carpet and upholstered walls embrace their guest, giving a sense of cosy luxury.

The common spaces are homely with plenty of layering, soft surfaces, Persian rugs, all complimented with honey natural timbers. The partners in this gregarious enterprise are all classics with copper tapware by Vola, Kvadrat fabrics, ClassiCon and Thonet furniture. Come in out of the cold and get cosy the rooftop bar is open till 2am!

Credits: The Flushing Meadows Hotel

Out/About: THE FLUSHING MEADOWS HOTEL

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

Following in the footsteps of his late muse Arne Jacobsen’s ‘Room 606’, Jaime Hayón designs ‘Room 506’ at the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, Copenhagen. 50 years on, designed exclusively for the hotel, a little Jacobsen gem the Drop Chair, is the belle of the ball at this illustrious party. Re-launched by Fritz Hansen in September this year it was given a new outfit as part of Hayón’s vision for ‘Room 506’.

Formerly the SAS Royal Hotel, Arne Jacobsen oversaw all aspects of the original design in 1960, from the architectural façade down to the cutlery. Some of his most renowned furniture pieces such as the Egg chair and Swan chair were developed and went on to become design classics from this fruitful project.

“Coming from the Mediterranean, to be able to make an imprint on Danish design has been an incredibly special experience for me. The idea for this room is to create a luminous space that brings joy and genuine comfort through the Fritz Hansen designs along with some of my own designs and art.”
Jaime Hayón

This is a celebration of two brilliant designers who although from very different cultural backgrounds have a common design ethos; the appreciation of organic lines, minimalist values, fine craftsmanship and exceptional materials.

Hayón, as did his predecessor, oversaw every detail of Room 506 from the linen to the furniture. His signature Ro Armchair in dove grey, Favn Sofa in navy, Analog Tables, and decorative ceramic Bosa Table, sit handsomely on the terracotta carpet. The Drop Chair, feminine in crushed velvet, glows in the company of her new cohorts. Complementing the interior with soft light, his A-Balls Pendant and Chinoz Lamp, along with custom decorative objects embrace this traveller’s haven.

Jaime Hayón excels at inducing the same sublime serenity that Jacobsen is famous for, but adds his own playful charm. For all of you lucky enough to find yourself in Denmark it’s nice to know that both rooms are just waiting for your company.

Credits: Hayon Studio

Out/About: HAYON Studio Room 506

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

Furniture and houses are of course always designed in a context. I have rarely built a house where I didn’t also design the furniture. It is of course fundamental that the furniture is practical. Chairs are not designed to look at but to sit on, but of course it makes you happy, if they are also worth looking at – Finn Juhl, 1982

Danish architect Finn Juhl is now perhaps more renowned for his furniture than his architecture. Juhl worked closely with cabinetmaker and craftsman Niels Vodder to create such icons as the ‘Pelican Chair’ and the ‘Chieftains Chair’.

Juhl’s house, on the outskirts of Copenhagen is a modest abode, now open as a museum for the public to sense first hand the impact of Denmark’s design history and its significant contribution to the Scandivanian Modern period.

Inside the home, the spaces have a wonderful sense of connectivity, each one enticing and beckoning you with a promise of divine discovery. They are warm and sociable spaces that are lovingly curated. Embracing a theory he called “from the inside and out”, Juhl’s idea was that the inception of a building began with envisaging and planning its furniture. A fully furnished space could then start to determine both the spatial envelope required and thus the overall character of the architecture.

Heavily influenced by the artists of his time, Finn Juhl felt that a good designer should also build a collection that is visually eclectic but complementary. This ethos is apparent in his house where everything comes together with such harmony from the furniture pieces to the art, carpets, books, trinkets and treasures, and paint treatments. It’s a creative den, a visual feast of inspiration.

Juhl’s ‘Poet Sofa’, with its welcoming embrace is a hero piece in this picturesque home. Sitting in perfect harmony with the ‘Chieftains Chair’, both true icons conversationally face each other over a sculptural fireplace – the true heart of this home.

Credits: Finn Juhl

House of Finn Juhl

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

It is the quintessential white washed walls, with their rich textures and vernacular forms, that make for the perfect backdrops to the regional objets d’art at the Masseria Cimino. A rustic, beautifully restored, and lovingly-curated guesthouse in Puglia, Italy, this family-run haven is full of history. It’s stone building blocks date back to 6th century B.C., recycled in the 1700’s to build this extraordinary farmhouse’s perimeter wall.

The hotel is honest and authentic, its fabrics simple, bed linens crisp, bed spreads locally crafted. Vine-ripening tomatoes bountifully hang between raw lightbulbs from the breakfast room. Knobbly and knotted old olive trees and cacti adorn the garden creating an endless supply of decorative foliage to bring inside. Sun loungers are covered by simple white canvas shades, brass taps float over raw stone basins, window frames are painted a subtle shade of blue and bowls of lemons abound. Roaring open fires and candlelit rooms add to the contemplative authentic simplicity, the slowing down of pace, and the purity of time spent at this ancient abode.

Set against the backdrop of the blue yonder of the Adriatic this beauty beckons to the soul a celebration of all that is the good life.

Credits: Masseria Cimino, Carla Coulson, Project Fairytale

Out/About: Masseria Cimino

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

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3_hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

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Hotel Hotel is a collaboration between designers, artists, artisans and fantasists… We love hotels, not for their swank but for reminding us of our transience and the importance of romance… We like textures and patinas that remind us of the bush, big trees, well-worn t-shirts and old wise faces that in every line reflect the enormity and joy of a life well lived… We treasure simple human interactions and making every day experiences interesting and special.

Canberra’s newest boutique Hotel Hotel is no ordinary guesthouse, but more a visionary platform for social interaction. Brothers Nector and Johnothan Efkarpidis have embarked on this ambitious project with fervour with architect Fender Katsalidis, who has orchestrated the master planning and the architectural bones of this brutalist-inspired, and March Studio who introduce the visitor to the hotel through the lobby and stair.

The hotel celebrates that inevitable extra layer of warmth we seek in the nation’s capital, a moody experience of raw materials and rich natural textures all dimly lit by very deliberate shafts of light. Hotel Hotel is a monumental roll call of Australian creatives across all disciplines and celebrates the collaborative crafts of it’s doers, curators, makers and artists.

Everywhere you go in Hotel Hotel you are met by delightful surprises. From the moment you walk into the entry foyer, which houses a small, but engaging library of loanable books on art, architecture and design your arrival to an environment that is richly curious, yet snug and welcoming is felt. Throughout the hotel, vintage pieces courtesy of Ken Neale sit side by side with vintage-inspired custom lighting silhouettes, custom-commissioned art (ranging from contemporary photographer Lee Grant to the late ceramist Gerard Havekes, whose vintage mosaic tiles were lovingly collected and curated by his daughter Anna-Maryke), boxy linen uniforms and unconventional floral arrangements.

The guest rooms read as a richly developed theatre set and it is no surprise that the revivalist approach was orchestrated by music video and advertising director Don Cameron. Each room has its own heartbeat. It’s raw, it’s rich and it’s original with anything that was not in existence dreamt up by Cameron and fabricated as editions by craftsman and artisan companies. It’s the theatrical experience you want to stay in for days on end. It seduces your sense of curiosity, beckoning you to discover all the dark recesses of its secrets.

As Efkarpidis says ‘ultimately you want the business guest, student, locals and someone travelling from the outskirts of Canberra staying with family and friends to sit down beside each other and have a conversation’. Canberra after all, is all about this collision of different identities and a good hotel is all about human interactions. We whole-heartedly felt both of these experiences at Hotel Hotel.

Credits: Hotel Hotel

OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Hotel

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

The walls are pink, the furniture is pink, the ceiling is pink, every thing is pink. I don’t know what to tell you, it’s a statement. – restauranteur Mourad Mazouz

Right in the heart of London sandwiched between Saville Row and Regent Street sits Sketch. A visionary dream conjured up by restauranteur Mourad Mazouz and chef Pierre Gagnaire has seen this 18th century building reinvented into a dynamic platform for food, art and music.

Every two years the main gallery restaurant space will be given to a different artist to create an installation they are given carte blanche to create. It’s an all-encompassing experience that can be enjoyed from the very comfortable confines of your dinner table.

The second installment, after Martin Creed’s 2012 installation, is a magical feasting boudoir of art and interiors created by Turner Prize winning artist David Shrigley and world acclaimed decorative architect India Mahdavi.

India Mahdavi’s monochromatic pink blush design with its plush overstuffed velvet banquettes and armchairs are delicious in stark contrast to David Shrigley’s satirical drawings that line the walls. Like little riddles Shrigley’s verbal expression also extends to the tableware. To top things off, all of the restaurtant staff are dressed by Richard Nicoll in futuristic grey boiler suits and shirt dresses.

Pass the rose petal martini please!

Credits: Sketch

OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

Danish architect Frederikke Aagaard has beautifully reinvigorated the Rungstedgaard Hotel near Copenhagen. By intertwining original detailing from this awe-inspiring 1917’s building with contemporary furniture and artwork Aagaard has created an elegant, timeless interior that emulates sophisticated indulgence.

Housed on a grand estate, the Rungstedgaard Hotel is a commanding manor that knows all about hospitality. Having flourished with A-list parties during the 1920s, its handsome bones have accommodated grand celebrations, solace and romance ever since.

Frederikke Aagaard has exquisitely curated modern design classics against the hotel’s generously graceful architecture. The Bouroullec Brothers’ Slow Chair by Vitra nuzzle together while on the other side of an ornate fireplace proudly sits Oscar Zieta’s Chippensteel Chair. Jamie Hayon’s Pina chairs for Magis are timelessly chic with Svenskt Tenn feature cushions paired up beautifully with Jenny Bäck’s Lean lamp.

A beautiful restrained collection of iconic treasures with a fresh palette of finishes, these good-looking interiors encourage hotel guests to sit back and enjoy all the spoils that the good life has to offer.

Credits: Frederikke Aagaard

OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

The Ham Yard Hotel is totally stuffed with plushness. It is a vibrant home-away-from-home just bursting with the signature British Kemp cool. Kit and Tim Kemp have gone all the way once again, to ensure that The Ham Yard is a memorable den for world-weary travellers.

Each one of its 91 rooms are about comfort and energy – inviting overstuffed armchairs beckon you to take time out, while electric combinations of colour and pattern thrill the senses. Lusciously dressed with rich, personable details suh as stacked coffee books, flowers in vases, rich tapestries and buoyant artworks give you the prim and proper sense of a everything you could want from a quintessentially English homestay.

It’s this delightful attention to materiality that defines the Kit Kemp signature. Handcrafted, robust ethnic textiles sit comfortably on traditional silhouettes and heavily buttoned upholstery. Strong timber legs ground fiery fabrics and wall-hangings ranging from Indian rural scenes, to lordy portraits, to the work our very own favourite Shilo Engelbrecht, delight the roving eye. Heavy draperies ensure that the visitor is well cocooned in their abode.

It’s a typically English sense of eccentricity that we know and love that allows the confidence to layer the conservative with the outlandish with such flair. Once again, Firmdale Hotels are at the top of their game. Where do I check in?

Credits: Firmdale Hotels

Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

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