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In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

On its 100-year anniversary, originally built under the French civic planning of Georges-Eugène Haussmann, the historic Hôtel Vernet hotel has undergone a significant renovation by interior designer François Champsaur and it’s an absolute work of art.

Taking the old building, which sits between the Place de l’Etoile (Charles de Gaulle) and the prestigious Golden Triangle district, the French designer has created a space of elegance and artistry, boasting in equal measure the modern aesthetic and French sophistication. It’s a combination that, while not new to the designer having worked on various luxurious hotels and a number of homes of art collectors’, is done with great skill. Bold colours are used in a way that complement perfectly the decadence of rich materials while energetic patterns sit comfortably with fine lines.

Each detail – whether it be furniture or fittings, paint colours or floors – speaks somehow to both modern art and French elegance at once. Art in the obvious sense, that is, paintings, are not only on the walls but also find expression on the floors in the form of simply fabulous rugs, becoming art works in themselves, and are found also on the ceilings (with fresco by French visual artist Jean-Michel Alberola commissioned). The furniture is wholly modern with its minimal form but elegant in material and the choice of colours are bright yet not gaudy, contemporary while also oozing class. The copper bar feels fresh but sleek, while marble table-tops oscillate between simple geometric shapes and sinuous curves which defy their very materiality. Of course, we cannot forget the monumental stained glass dome. Designed by Gustave Eiffel, the impressive glasswork is certainly a generous nod to French workmanship and classic design, but, as it hovers over a very minimal dining area, nestles itself into the modern tone.

All in all, the Hotel Vernet blends two distinct eras and aesthetics together beautifully, paying respect to both and being something truly unique in its own right.

Credits: Hôtel Vernet via Yatzer

Hôtel Vernet

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

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In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

In/Out: Como Point Yamu

Located at the tip of Cape Yamu, Phuket, and overlooking the utterly picturesque Andaman Sea is Point Yamu by Como, a luxury hotel with adjoining Shambhala wellness centre. What’s special about this accommodation – with its 79 rooms and 27 private villas – is its approach to luxury. Both in terms of hospitality and design, COMO is low-key – intimate and down-to-earth and focusing on Thai tradition to create a space of fresh indulgence. While also feeling positively contemporary, the hotel honours the simple pleasures. As designer Paola Navone puts it, the hotel is ‘simple with a touch of irony and not aggressive.’

Tasked with designing a space that could contain the very special COMO attitude to hospitality and wellness, Pavone has incorporated the immediate environment of Phang Nga Bay – a UNESCO World Heritage Site, into the design. Drawing on what surrounds the spot – which as Navone points out would ‘be hard not to be inspired by’, with views from every direction – the Italian designer has called on ‘her colour’. Sweeping shades of blue and turquoise dominate the colour palette, spilling into the surrounding sea and sky and blurring the line between interior and exterior. Open spaces throughout the hotel let the landscape in, and natural materials and organic shapes mimic the landscape and call up a history of handcraft. The exterior of the hotel for example is wrapped in a mesh screen, turning what is a ‘massive structure’ into something ‘softer, less opposite to nature and connecting the architecture to the landscape in an unexpected way’. Likewise, the dotted villas lay close to the sea, from a distance seeming to ‘float on water’, and sunlight is drawn into the main structure to create natural partitions where, ordinarily, walls would sit – exemplifying the non-aggressive approach Navone speaks of.

As for tradition, Navone was always keen to ‘take advantage of Thai craft savoir-faire as much as possible’. Ceramic, one of the most important craft in Thailand, is dotted throughout the hotel, in the bedrooms, the spa walls and the bathrooms. Custom-designed special ceramic blocks create transparent partitions; while ceramic is also found as legs and supports for furniture; and for some of the graphic elements, such as the room numbers.  Solid timber, too, from northern Thailand, was used to produce all of the room furniture while traditional basket weaving traditions – so central to the country, are drawn into numerous parts of the hotel. ‘We used giant weaving to design the corridors, as well as the white giant lamps that hang in the lobby,’ says Navone.

Of course the challenge was to not only pay tribute to the past but to design a space that was new, a place where guests would breathe much of Thai traditions but in a contemporary setting. As well as crisp neutrals and open spaces, which will always make a space feel current, the design is contemporary in that it is unique – peppered gently with ‘new ways of presenting everyday items’ and mixing different centuries and continents together. In the Italian restaurant and breakfast area is a wall full of crisp white dishes that hang like little paintings, while large scale tubular lamps hang floating in the breeze from the ceiling – mimicking nature at the same time as acting as a quite brilliant piece of contemporary art. In the Thai restaurant, wood is used in a way that makes ‘scales’ for a wall.

At Point Yamu, nature, tradition and individuality are beautifully embraced. The result is a space that is traditional but new, comfortable and serene, humble yet completely luxurious. Rather than extravagance, Point Yamu makes the most of the surrounding riches – creating the kind of bliss we feel at home in.

Credits: Photography by Ben Pyke

Point Yamu by Como

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Coqui Coqui Perfumery Yucatán

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Coqui Coqui Perfumery Yucatán

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Coqui Coqui Perfumery Yucatán

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Coqui Coqui Perfumery Yucatán

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Coqui Coqui Perfumery Yucatán

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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Coqui Coqui Perfumery Yucatán

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The Coqui Coqui brand story is a rather romantic one, organically expanding from a simple humble little spa safari tent on a beach to a perfumery and now to four highly sought-after hotels and spa residencies, as well as a full range of boutique products. What ties Coqui Coqui together is the Yucatan Peninsula, a flat, limestone-rich stretch of southern Mexico, scattered with palm trees and white sand, hot sun and coconuts! Owned and run by husband and wife duo Nicolas Melville and Francesca Bonato, the Coqui Coqui brand has at its heart one particularly dreamy sense of place.

From the first time he visited the Yucatan, Melville was instantly captivated. With an interest in botanicals and a background in landscape architecture, the natural environment, traditional buildings and way of life appealed immediately – so much so that he relocated to the Yucatan to set up what would be the beginning of Coqui Coqui, a simple massage tent on Tulum beach. Not long after, Bonato happened upon the place while on holiday. Falling in love instantly; Coqui Coqui would then become a joint venture of love and creativity between Melville and Bonato. The tent that offered tea and massages became a house (built on the same beachfront land) with a spa and boutique, then the duo began renting the house because “friends and family started asking for rooms and a place to stay,” and – as if by accident – Coqui Coqui Tulum was born. Coqui Coqui Coba, Coqui Coqui Merida, and Coqui Coqui Valladoid (which houses the perfumery) followed, each located in their own special location across the region.

Captivated by the dreamy landscape, the local building techniques, the handcrafts and the general way of life, a philosophy that celebrates the Yucatan was only natural for the pair. “It’s really going back to our roots, a healthy and simple way of living,” says Melville. Coqui Coqui products are locally sourced ingredients, “We weren’t going to buy shampoo at the supermarket,” says Nicolas, “so we found a guy here that makes incredible shampoo by hand with the pulp from locally cultivated aloe vera plants.”

The hotels have an effortlessy beautiful appeal, a kind of bohemian romance that respects the local aesthetic – rich, earthy colours and gentle hues, fresh cotton fabrics, roughly polished floors, understated furniture and hand-made accessories. At Coqui Coqui Tulum, for example, the beach front structure is made from limestone, as if extending from the very earth that it sits upon.

In the same vein, the Coqui Coqui perfumes are made with native ingredients and artisanal production, blended at their flagship perfumery in Valladolid, and inspired by the truly local. From warm and woody scents, to alluring hints of spice, to notes of sweet coconut and citrus, fresh flowers or smoky tobacco, every perfume embodies the romance of the Yucatan. Each hotel has its signature scent; Coqui Coqui Tulum having ‘Coco Coco’, created from three different coconuts that grow on beaches nearby, and ‘Orange Blossom’, which has become “the signature smell of the hotel.”

It is a romantically simple sentiment to honour the landscape so poetically. As Melville sums up himself, “The Coqui Coqui brand showcases a lifestyle; a cocoon which represents the flora, the earth, the fruit, the woods and the landscape, the folklore and the traditions of the culture: At the soul of everything is the Yucatan.”

Credits: The Line

Coqui Coqui

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

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In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

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In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: Scorpios Mykonos

Perched on a ridge between Kavos and Paraga Beach, Scorpios Mykonos blends into the landscape perfectly – almost as if it were carved straight from the earth, a little honey-coloured village made entirely of rock and clay. From deck chair to exterior wall, the retreat successfully reflects its immediate landscape: warm tones, dusty textures and organic forms.

Eager to provide a full experience of Mykonos, Mario Hertel and Thomas Heyne, turned to the history of Ancient Greece, in particular, the agora. Literally meaning ‘a gathering space’, an agora was traditionally used as the meeting point for ‘the athletic, artistic, spiritual and political – the Community’. Here, they’ve translated this concept into a day retreat, beach club, bar and restaurant that is both social and relaxing, where time slows right down – almost to a stop – and lets you escape the world. The sense of full immersion into relaxation is extremely alluring.

Building on nearby hotel San Giorgio Mykonos, architects Dimitiris and Konstantinos Karampatakis of K-studio, Athens, Scorpios is conceived as meandering collection of indoor and outdoor spaces from beach front, to beach terrace, to restaurant and finally, inside ‘the house’. Divided as such, the retreat is generously proportioned, offering numerous spots to escape to. Read a book in the under the shade of the thatched cabanas, enjoy (multiple) morning coffees with friends in the eastern terraces, or have cocktails in the evening at the club-house with your love – there is somewhere for everyone, and every mood, to enjoy together or alone.

Scorpios Mykonos is wildly beautiful. Dappled sunlight and billowing fabrics, the contrast between textured stone walls and accents of white washed ones, heavy timber against delicate weaving, the calm that pours from natural tones throughout – it’s the kind of beauty that feels effortless, one the Greeks really do master. Between a pared back colour palette, natural, weather-worn materials of stone and warm timber, and the fine, elegant furnishings that fill the space, Scorpios Mykonos is part-1960s Greek glamour and part-contemporary modernism, oozing with richness in the most subtle way. Ultimately, it’s a space of ease, delightfully celebrating the local culture in the process.

Credits: Scorpios Mykonos

OUT/ABOUT: Scorpios Mykonos

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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Like its sister hotel, Palazzina G in Venice, G-Rough celebrates history and place. Set in a tall and narrow, five-story, 17th century building – in Piazza Navona not far from Sant’Agnese church, this design hotel is a satisfying look into the real Rome.

In collaboration with architect Giorgia Cerulli, Emanuele Garosci and Gabriele Salini have created a ten-suite hotel that preserves 400 years of architectural history and at the same time presents to its visitors a contemporary Rome.

Cerulli has incorporated as much of the building’s original features as possible. Old paint and raw materials are left exposed on walls – literally revealing the layers of history embedded in the property, and wooden roofs and elaborate parquet floors reflect the Rome that once was. Perhaps the most endearing feature of the building’s age is the original Latin inscription on the facade: “SATIS AMPLA QVAE SECVRITATE RIDEAT” (meaning “big enough to give a feeling of security”).

While a definite reminder of where it has come from, G-Rough also speaks to the present. The bare walls and high oak beam ceilings of the past contrast with iconic furniture and contemporary art, reflecting the city’s continual flux and cultural development. Each of the five floors pay homage to a different Italian designer from the 1930s to the 1970s, including Ico Parisi, Giò Ponti, Guglielmo Ulrich and Aristide Seguso, and a changing display of art works from emerging Italian artists fill the walls.

In aesthetic terms, the hotel is described as ‘rough-luxury’ – a new kind of Italian luxury characterised by distressed plaster walls and mid-century Italian design. But the design far transcends being superficial; its sentiment is genuine and firmly rooted in place. “We’re presenting a very Italian sense of luxury,” says entrepreneur Gabriele Salini, “one with history, design, art, and a touch of whimsy.”

To combine original features, classic Italian design and contemporary art might sound ambitious, even confused. But here the designers have struck a meticulously crafted balance between celebrating a rich history and acknowledging an exciting present. G-Rough is eclectic but consistent in its design, playful yet grounded. And it rejoices in all that is the city of Rome; its past tied to its present, and its continual evolution of a strong culture of art and design.

Credits: G-Rough

G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

Nestled in Cradle Mountain/Lake St Clair National Park, in Tasmania, siting regally out on Lake St Clair sits ‘Pumphouse Point’. The hotel, is a whimsical gem of industry, repurposed as a contemplative retreat. Built in the 1930’s to house the water turbines for the State’s hydropower system, the exterior shell has been left as is. Weather beaten and lichen covered, it’s surface is a visual history of 85 years of industrial endurance.

The brainchild of tourism entrepreneur Simon Currant, ‘Pumphouse Point’ was realized with the help of Hobart & Launceston-based architect Peter Walker of Cumulus Studio. A second generation Taswegian Walker’s, affiliation with the treasured landscape of his homeland is evident in the design. Walker says, “From inception we envisaged that the Pumphouse Point redevelopment should encapsulate rugged simplicity and unrefined comfort”. This is an honest retreat for lovers of the vast outdoors.

‘Pumphouse Point’ consists of two buildings; The Pumphouse perched out on the lake, and The Shorehouse 250m inland both connected by a dramatically straight concrete pier. The 18 suites are bare bones cosy. Local Tasmanian Oak, wool carpet, wool felted blankets atop crisp white sheets are all you need. Exposed brass pipes pump pristine water into your monochromatic bathroom. Tranquil sanctuaries, the common spaces have combustion fires to warm your body as you stare out at the wonder of nature.

The original structures are off-form concrete, their recent incarnation embracing the industrial history engrained in the fabric of the buildings whilst being snug with creature comforts. A spectacular place of solace with a true frontier spirit!

Credits: Pumphouse Point
Photohgraphy by:
Adam John Gibson and Stuart Gibson 

OUT/ABOUT: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The Hotel Covell in Los Feliz, the epicentre of Los Angeles’ east-side hipster scene, has been called a modern day descendant of the Chateau Marmont, born with old soul. Set within a 1930s building over bar owner and entrepreneur Dustin Lancaster’s Bar Covell and designed by Sally Breer of Co-Mingle, the five-room hotel is a snapshot of five chapters in the life of a fictional bon-vivant writer character named ‘George Covell’. Loosely shaped by the collective stories of Lancaster & Breer’s own lives, Covell’s fictional tale is narrated from room to room starting in his hometown Oklahoma journeying to New York, with a brief sojourn to Paris and to his adventures beyond.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter One, called the ‘Oklahoma Room’, imagines George Covell’s rustic and earthy hometown and is inspired by the Mid-West with its humble sense of comfort, recycled timber and aged leather.

Chapter Two, the ‘1950s NYC Flat’, takes us to Covell’s new found world of industrial and functional rigour. Modernist design inspirations (the design of Room 02 is so very Charlotte Perriand) share the stage with iconic midcentury design classics by the likes of Charles and Ray Eames.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter 3, ‘A Parisian Atelier’ imagines the lodging of Covell’s girlfriend with soft textures and a bohemian feminine sensibility. A blush pink Eileen Gray Bibendum chair alludes to the romance of Covell’s 1970s Parisian dalliance.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The richly layered, palette of Chapter Four ‘Supreme’, finds our character George Covell adding to his collection with travels far and wide to Monaco and India.

His story, concludes with Chapter Five ‘The Heir’, envisaging the apartment Covell’s Paris-raised daughter inhabits, surrounded by her father’s life-long collection of treasures, back in New York city in the late 1970s and ‘80s.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Credits: Sally Breer & Hotel Covell

HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: LA PISCINA DE LA SUITE 'POOL COTTAGE' MENORCA

Menorcan ‘Hotel Torralbenc’ is an idyllic retreat on the sun drenched Mediterranean island. Organic structures with crisp white-washed walls, terracotta roofs, dry walls, and picturesque gardens are the face of this Española dream.

Once a purely agricultural region, the Balearics archipelago situated off the eastern side of Spain, is now a destination for people looking for solace from the bustle of big European cities. ‘Hotel Torralbenc’s’ artisan fabrication – like the dry walls, thatched and stone arched ceilings – are a reminder of days when this level of detail was common.

Abundant in robust materials the interiors with their limestone floors and hearty slabs of timber are complemented with sisal rugs, simple upholstery in neutral palettes and soft graphic artwork. The thick walls, intimate volumes of space and play of natural light create heavenly spaces to escape to.

Brilliant garden blooms and the expansive bright blue sky punctuate this otherwise soft mirage.

Photography by: Enrique Palacio Via Architectural Digest

Hotel Torralbenc

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: The Greenwich Hotel Penthouse

Perched atop the Greenwich Hotel in TriBeCa New York City is a penthouse of solace, in the spirit of the Japanese aesthetic Wabi-sabi. With a rich sense of minimalism, the Penthouse’s character is strengthened by materials soaked in history.

When Robert De Niro and Ira Drukier – the Greenwich Hotel’s owners – approached Belgium interior designer Axel Vervoordt, they were passionate about creating a space manifested by its intrinsic link to the history of TriBeCa. Vervoordt drew on the concept of the ‘workshop’, the very foundation of the city that was built by hard working immigrants with a vision for a new era. Tribeca was the space where East met West and where the humble was celebrated.

Together with Japanese-born Belgium-based architect Tatsuro Miki, Vervoodt has created a majestic sanctuary so far removed from the bustle of the street below. Core to both designers was the incorporation of Wabi-sabi in its entirety. The Penthouse design incorporates the philosophical beliefs of Wabi: beauty found in the imperfection and authenticity; Artemop – where time becomes art; and poor materials that are rich in spirit.

This idea of perfect imperfection is evident throughout. Reclaimed timber beams and ancient stone are employed, imbued with the history of the hands which formed them, while the walls are rendered with upstate New York earth.

These quiet spaces of beauty touch some inner peace that is core to all of us. It’s an age old Buddhist teaching that has been reinvigorated by a visionary into a new global philosophy of design, one where we learn to connect, respect and appreciate our existence.

Credits: The Greenwich Hotel

TRIBECA PENTHOUSE AT THE GREENWICH HOTEL

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

Number 11, Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa’s private residence in Colombo, is an eclectic lesson in refined taste. At once architecturally cultured and almost primitively executed, it is peppered with unexpected follies and exotic moments of the outside brought in.

Elegant and raw, tactile rendered walls meet glossy epoxied floors and heavy thick arched walls provide cool comfort. Intricate traditional carved timber doors and columns represent the abundant local craftsmanship. Peppered around the house are Bawa’s own furniture designs, prototypes for the pieces he designed for hotels and homes around the country and the world, a delicate combination of new vision and traditional materials. Meticulous attention to decorative detail are present in Bawa designed glass and brass wall sconce and sinuous cast wrought iron balustrade, which snakes from the ground floor up the tower to the roof terrace.

Sensitive to his tropical surroundings Bawa’s house is abundant in air and light. Areas are separated by gardens and courtyards so short courtyard exterior vistas are always present. Rustic stones inlaid in the floor or an impromptu stone bench are constant reminders of the relationship between the built environment and nature. It’s this perfect interior/exterior balance that creates such an idyllic tranquil gallery-esque home.

Alive with culture, his highly curated interiors include textile masterpieces by Ena de Silva and hand-painted doors by Australian artist Donald Friend (the originals of which can be found in the Art Gallery of New South Wales). Skillful at uniting the unlikely, religious artefacts preside over contemporary sculpture in a pastiche of exotic, vernacular, tribal and modern influences.

Recently visited by Arent&Pyke designer Dominique, the exotic enchantment and timelessness of Bawa’s own home is undeniably captivating. Bawa’s mix of Asian soul and European education is clearly expressed in his architectural and interior genius.

The doors of Bawa home are thrown open to visitors for accommodation and house tours.

Photography by: Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: Geoffrey Bawa’s House, Colombo Sri Lanka

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