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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

It is the quintessential white washed walls, with their rich textures and vernacular forms, that make for the perfect backdrops to the regional objets d’art at the Masseria Cimino. A rustic, beautifully restored, and lovingly-curated guesthouse in Puglia, Italy, this family-run haven is full of history. It’s stone building blocks date back to 6th century B.C., recycled in the 1700’s to build this extraordinary farmhouse’s perimeter wall.

The hotel is honest and authentic, its fabrics simple, bed linens crisp, bed spreads locally crafted. Vine-ripening tomatoes bountifully hang between raw lightbulbs from the breakfast room. Knobbly and knotted old olive trees and cacti adorn the garden creating an endless supply of decorative foliage to bring inside. Sun loungers are covered by simple white canvas shades, brass taps float over raw stone basins, window frames are painted a subtle shade of blue and bowls of lemons abound. Roaring open fires and candlelit rooms add to the contemplative authentic simplicity, the slowing down of pace, and the purity of time spent at this ancient abode.

Set against the backdrop of the blue yonder of the Adriatic this beauty beckons to the soul a celebration of all that is the good life.

Credits: Masseria Cimino, Carla Coulson, Project Fairytale

Out/About: Masseria Cimino

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

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In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

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Hotel Hotel is a collaboration between designers, artists, artisans and fantasists… We love hotels, not for their swank but for reminding us of our transience and the importance of romance… We like textures and patinas that remind us of the bush, big trees, well-worn t-shirts and old wise faces that in every line reflect the enormity and joy of a life well lived… We treasure simple human interactions and making every day experiences interesting and special.

Canberra’s newest boutique Hotel Hotel is no ordinary guesthouse, but more a visionary platform for social interaction. Brothers Nector and Johnothan Efkarpidis have embarked on this ambitious project with fervour with architect Fender Katsalidis, who has orchestrated the master planning and the architectural bones of this brutalist-inspired, and March Studio who introduce the visitor to the hotel through the lobby and stair.

The hotel celebrates that inevitable extra layer of warmth we seek in the nation’s capital, a moody experience of raw materials and rich natural textures all dimly lit by very deliberate shafts of light. Hotel Hotel is a monumental roll call of Australian creatives across all disciplines and celebrates the collaborative crafts of it’s doers, curators, makers and artists.

Everywhere you go in Hotel Hotel you are met by delightful surprises. From the moment you walk into the entry foyer, which houses a small, but engaging library of loanable books on art, architecture and design your arrival to an environment that is richly curious, yet snug and welcoming is felt. Throughout the hotel, vintage pieces courtesy of Ken Neale sit side by side with vintage-inspired custom lighting silhouettes, custom-commissioned art (ranging from contemporary photographer Lee Grant to the late ceramist Gerard Havekes, whose vintage mosaic tiles were lovingly collected and curated by his daughter Anna-Maryke), boxy linen uniforms and unconventional floral arrangements.

The guest rooms read as a richly developed theatre set and it is no surprise that the revivalist approach was orchestrated by music video and advertising director Don Cameron. Each room has its own heartbeat. It’s raw, it’s rich and it’s original with anything that was not in existence dreamt up by Cameron and fabricated as editions by craftsman and artisan companies. It’s the theatrical experience you want to stay in for days on end. It seduces your sense of curiosity, beckoning you to discover all the dark recesses of its secrets.

As Efkarpidis says ‘ultimately you want the business guest, student, locals and someone travelling from the outskirts of Canberra staying with family and friends to sit down beside each other and have a conversation’. Canberra after all, is all about this collision of different identities and a good hotel is all about human interactions. We whole-heartedly felt both of these experiences at Hotel Hotel.

Credits: Hotel Hotel

OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Hotel

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

The walls are pink, the furniture is pink, the ceiling is pink, every thing is pink. I don’t know what to tell you, it’s a statement. – restauranteur Mourad Mazouz

Right in the heart of London sandwiched between Saville Row and Regent Street sits Sketch. A visionary dream conjured up by restauranteur Mourad Mazouz and chef Pierre Gagnaire has seen this 18th century building reinvented into a dynamic platform for food, art and music.

Every two years the main gallery restaurant space will be given to a different artist to create an installation they are given carte blanche to create. It’s an all-encompassing experience that can be enjoyed from the very comfortable confines of your dinner table.

The second installment, after Martin Creed’s 2012 installation, is a magical feasting boudoir of art and interiors created by Turner Prize winning artist David Shrigley and world acclaimed decorative architect India Mahdavi.

India Mahdavi’s monochromatic pink blush design with its plush overstuffed velvet banquettes and armchairs are delicious in stark contrast to David Shrigley’s satirical drawings that line the walls. Like little riddles Shrigley’s verbal expression also extends to the tableware. To top things off, all of the restaurtant staff are dressed by Richard Nicoll in futuristic grey boiler suits and shirt dresses.

Pass the rose petal martini please!

Credits: Sketch

OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

Danish architect Frederikke Aagaard has beautifully reinvigorated the Rungstedgaard Hotel near Copenhagen. By intertwining original detailing from this awe-inspiring 1917’s building with contemporary furniture and artwork Aagaard has created an elegant, timeless interior that emulates sophisticated indulgence.

Housed on a grand estate, the Rungstedgaard Hotel is a commanding manor that knows all about hospitality. Having flourished with A-list parties during the 1920s, its handsome bones have accommodated grand celebrations, solace and romance ever since.

Frederikke Aagaard has exquisitely curated modern design classics against the hotel’s generously graceful architecture. The Bouroullec Brothers’ Slow Chair by Vitra nuzzle together while on the other side of an ornate fireplace proudly sits Oscar Zieta’s Chippensteel Chair. Jamie Hayon’s Pina chairs for Magis are timelessly chic with Svenskt Tenn feature cushions paired up beautifully with Jenny Bäck’s Lean lamp.

A beautiful restrained collection of iconic treasures with a fresh palette of finishes, these good-looking interiors encourage hotel guests to sit back and enjoy all the spoils that the good life has to offer.

Credits: Frederikke Aagaard

OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

The Ham Yard Hotel is totally stuffed with plushness. It is a vibrant home-away-from-home just bursting with the signature British Kemp cool. Kit and Tim Kemp have gone all the way once again, to ensure that The Ham Yard is a memorable den for world-weary travellers.

Each one of its 91 rooms are about comfort and energy – inviting overstuffed armchairs beckon you to take time out, while electric combinations of colour and pattern thrill the senses. Lusciously dressed with rich, personable details suh as stacked coffee books, flowers in vases, rich tapestries and buoyant artworks give you the prim and proper sense of a everything you could want from a quintessentially English homestay.

It’s this delightful attention to materiality that defines the Kit Kemp signature. Handcrafted, robust ethnic textiles sit comfortably on traditional silhouettes and heavily buttoned upholstery. Strong timber legs ground fiery fabrics and wall-hangings ranging from Indian rural scenes, to lordy portraits, to the work our very own favourite Shilo Engelbrecht, delight the roving eye. Heavy draperies ensure that the visitor is well cocooned in their abode.

It’s a typically English sense of eccentricity that we know and love that allows the confidence to layer the conservative with the outlandish with such flair. Once again, Firmdale Hotels are at the top of their game. Where do I check in?

Credits: Firmdale Hotels

Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel
Oozing cool, the American Trade Hotel may have had its heyday in the 60’s and 70’s, but this smoking hot revival sets to rival that benchmark. Rich in historic character while still maintaining a contemporary homely feel, it’s not hard to imagine Picasso teaching Paloma how to sculpt a bird out of a leaf in the courtyard or Tilda Swinton sipping a Martini in the bar.

Originally built in 1917, the American Trade Building at 4 stories high was and still is, the tallest building in the old town of Panama City. Lucky if you’re a guest, as every room has a view over its charming neighbouring white-washed haciendas. We can almost feel the warm fragrant air waft in as you swing open the French doors to survey the panoramic surroundings. Taking a large lungful in, you kick off your shoes and pad across the ancient timber floorboards. Everything is how it should be as you flop onto your crisp white bed realizing that the old and the new meet with perfect clarity in this thoughtfully restrained interior.

What else would you expect from the the Ace Hotels crew. The American Trade Hotel is a heady mix of texture, colour, scale and details. Dark walnuts, rich colours and clean palettes are teemed up with local flora, Bertoia wire frames and Viennese rocking chairs. The layering is sumptuous and inviting, it just reeks of good times!

The American Trade Hotel has the feel that it very well could be the new hotbed of cultural and creative hustle and bustle.

Credits: Yatzer

Out/About: American Trade Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

Well its not often we’re speechless but this installation by designer Pierre Charpin in L’Appartement No.50 within Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse really takes your breath away. The exemplary balance between colour and the purest of palettes makes one’s heart sing.

L’Appartement No.50 is one of 337 apartments within Le Corbusier’s concrete dream for a utopian society. As you can image the bones of this building are blue blood modernist, the perfect backdrop to just about anything! Let it be said Pierre Charpin is not just anything. His design sensibility is so honest and intuitive, each piece surprising in it’s exploration of form and materiality. This is no roll-out design family, it is a thoughtful gathering of old friends that sit so comfortably together. Good humoured, robust and dependable, this is a gang you want to hang with.

Charpin has incorporated pieces by his predecessors such as Jasper Morrison, the Bouroullec Brothers and Konstantin Grcic with his own pieces into this domestic theatre. His ‘Playtime’ glass sculptures, ‘Oggetti Lenti’ vases sit and ‘Crescendo’ coffee table have blood ties back to the modernist movement while his suspended ceiling sculptures, ‘Mini Eclipse’ lamp, ‘Stump’ marble side table and ‘Desa’ floor lamp are true contemporaries.

His exquisitely measured layering of the 3D and 2D are heavenly and thanks to the hospitality of No.50’s resident Jean-Marc Drut – a true patron of the arts – this rare intimate gallery is open to the public during the summer months if you are lucky enough to find yourself in Marseille.

The fantasy of setting up a temporary home in the Cité Radieuse, to feel the history of radical and cultured thinking and know that you are following in the truest legacy of our built environment is nothing short of a dream.

Credits: Wallpaper & Yellowtrace

Out/About: Pierre Charpin’s L’Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS FOR J. HILL'S STANDARD

Bottoms up with these beauties! Exposed at this year’s Salone Internazionale Del Mobile in Milan, ‘Elements’ is the very ingenious union of J.Hill’s Standard and Scholten & Baijings. These stunning drinking vessels are sure to give breakfast in bed a cheeky spritz, or your next dinner party a new sense of elegance.

The brainchild behind J.Hill’s Standard is Anike Tyrrell a true visionary who is breathing life back into the Irish Waterford crystal industry. With one part ingenuity, a couple of traditional glass-blowing craftsmen and the collaborative mix-in of Dutch designers Scholten & Baijings, ‘Elements’ are the perfect receptacle for whatever drink takes your fancy. Tyrrell’s dream is not only to bring back the glory days of the glass craft, but also invigorate the industry with a glass blowing school for next gens. It’s big picture stuff and we like it.

In ‘Elements’, Scholten & Baijings have designed glassware that is exquisite in surface complexity yet beautifully humble in personality. In their own words, “the glass sizes are not prescriptive and suit a multitude of uses, from whiskey to wine to water”. They have amalgamated traditional patterns to fashion a new look book in glassware.

We are really looking forward to future collaborations between designers and J. Hill’s Standard (the pioneers of compounding glass to the superior production of crystal).

Credits: Scholten & Baijings, J.Hill’s Standard, Dezeen

OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 – ELEMENTS GLASSWARE BY SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico
If you are lucky enough to find yourself in Mexico City you might want to check into the Downtown Mexico for some beautiful bare bones luxury. The very talented Cherem Serrano Arquitectos cleverly converted this UNESCO world heritage site for Grupo Habita, into a wonderfully uplifting hotel with plenty of local cha cha.

The new additions are respectful to their host while still being a bit cheeky. Whilst the design maintains a minimal approach, materials such as terracotta breezeblocks add a rustic honest quality. No-fuss furniture in invigoratingly bright hues flirt with you. Rich earthy tones are offset by the vivid glossy white of bathroom tap ware and crisp bright linen. Abundant and green breezy patios and heavenly murals await weary travellers. The spatial volume of the common areas and rooms are lavish, allowing your mind to roam around in the history of your surroundings.

And… the hotel includes a hostel, Downtown Beds, which means that whether you’re down to your last peso or rolling in it, you can rest your weary head and enjoy a poolside margarita as you watch the locals go about their business in the old town.

Credits: Downtown Mexico

OUT/ABOUT: Downtown Mexico

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 - Marni's 'Animal House'

Italian fashion house Marni have brought their ‘Animal House’ to life at this year’s Salone del Mobile Milan with a fruitful co-lab with a group of Columbian women striving for financial independence, who live in and around Iza in the rural Andean region. A carnival of creatures, donkeys, giraffes, ducks, flamingos, ostriches, rabbits and chickens strut their stuff while an audience of vibrantly woven chairs watch on.

With personality PLUS these handcrafted limited edition magnificent creatures are obviously South American by nature; bright and resourceful with a hint of piñata about them that would bring the party to any interior. The collection is playful with one armed chairs leaning into each other’s confidence, lazy sun lounges lolling about, tables in checkerboard configurations and jaunty rocking chairs whistling dixie. Oversized one off animals puffed up with importance hold court – this is a catwalk of sorts in full swing!

We applaud Marni for talking the talk and walking the walk with impeccable style as always. Keeping it real all proceeds go to Associazione Sogni, an Italian charity devoted to helping terminally ill children.

Credits: designboom

OUT/ABOUT: MILAN 2014 – Marni’s ‘Animal House’

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