Categories

Design & Interiors

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

In/Out: Anna Karlin

London born, New York based art director Anna Karlin prides herself on not being pigeon-holed. This is a philosophy that sits well in the Big Apple where her line of furniture and textiles has received a very warm welcome.

Karlin’s ethos for her furniture and textile pieces is simple ‘Would I want it in my house?’… and if the answer to this is ‘yes’, she finds the best local craftspeople to help her realize her visions. Logistically, this enables her to have a close relationship with the production. It also ensures these skills are supported, as she states “If you’re actually employing someone fairly for the skills that they are so amazing at, that is a really worthwhile thing to spend your money on.”

This philosophy resonates in furniture pieces such as the lovingly detailed ‘Beauty Bar’ with it’s drawers individually numbered in brass and inlaid into ash timber, folding precisely away into an exquisite cylinder. The ‘Chess Stool’ of rolled steel with brass is hand-rubbed to create a layered patina. The ‘Parchment Stools’ are lathed wood upholstered in parchment, giving them their beautiful cloudy surface. Karlin’s tableware of glass, ceramics and brass ‘Bar Tools’ are pieces to ruminate on while enjoying a great meal with friends. And it’s this quietness of spirit that translates well into her textiles.

This sassy lass is very headstrong about the fluidity of disciplines, a great idea is a great idea whatever the medium. We will drink to that.

Credits: Anna Karlin

ANNA KARLIN

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

In/Out: PICHULIK Spring Summer 2015

South African jewellery designer Katherine-Mary Pichulik‘s latest collection ‘Baraka’ for this Spring Summer 2015 has strong North African ethnic ties. These corded, bound, woven, modern-day talismans are stunning creations, a spirited vision from the hotbed of Cape Town.

Striking royal blue, teal and signal blood red combined with gold, black and white make for arresting lucky charms. Inspired by the nomadic tribes of North Africa, the Berbers, and Islamic Malian architecture they are divine amulets and spiritual armour. The Arabic word ‘Baraka’ means blessing, flowing through the physical and spiritual, bringing with it prosperity, protection, and happiness. Core to Pichulik’s design ethic is this connection with the history of adornment. As the designer herself puts it, “Jewellery has always been linked to spirituality and important rites of passage. Pieces were crafted with a purpose and imbued with powers such as protection and healing. ‘Baraka’ excites me as it offers the opportunity to restore this.”

Set against fellow South African fashion designer Kat Van Duien’s voluminous garments in pure white this certainly is an summertime apparition of the most beautiful kind! Layered and bountiful, the dense cord and delicate gold beading are reminiscent of the jewels of days gone by with a modern twist.

Credits: Pinchulik

PICHULIK SPRING SUMMER 2015

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

In/Out: CULT - The Charity Project

Our very dear friends at CULT last week launched ‘The Chairity Project, Reinventing Design Icons’. Cult invited 14 Australasian creatives to reinterpret, reinvent and most importantly make their mark on a design classic – the ‘CH33’ chair by Hans J. Wegner for Carl Hansen & Sons.

The creative bunch were selected by CULT and the diverse bunch includes Industrial Designer Adam Goodrum, Product Designers Coco Flip and Dinosaur Designs, Artist Ken Done and Tracey Deep, Set Production Designer Alice Babidge, Stylist Megan Morton, Fashion Designers Basskie, Romance was Born and Zambesi, Accessories Designer Ryan Storer, Interior Architect George Livissiannis, Interior Designers Hecker Guthrie and Graphic Designers Toko.

The Reinventing Icons Project brings together charity, creativity and Australia’s much celebrated kinship with iconic Danish design.

The 14 completed chairs are up for grabs on Ebay until 8pm this evening with all proceeds going directly to charities selected by each designer. Link to the auction HERE

Credits: CULT

The Chairity Project, Reinventing Design Icons

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In/Out: Megan Morton & Space

In the spirit of giving, Sydney stylist Megan Morton and Space Furniture have curated an Australian designed and produced collection of Christmas gifts WALLPORN for the benefit of us all. Objects of joy these are no trinkets, but forever treasures.

Megan says “This year, I am going for presents and gestures that are long lasting investments. No more fillers, I want amazing never-to-be-found-gifts. So we present you with 4 incredible things you will NEVER see anywhere else! I worked with 4 people who I find to be beyond talented, rich in ideas and incredible at their chosen medium to produce this exclusive line of gifting for Space”.

All four artists although incredibly varied in their mediums and approach, complement and speak of the modern Christmas that is so very Australian. We caught up with Megan to chat about the new ensemble.

As a stylist you’d come across many beautiful objects made by many talented people, how did you manage to decide on these four designers?
I wanted to curate a collection that stood independently to the others but also worked as a suite of products, this meant working with established makers as well as new talent to ensure we had the delicate balance of covetable pieces that spanned a varied price range. The hardest challenge was making it all in Australia – for example, every element in Dan Hocking’s blue or bronze mirror is sourced and made in Australia, which is a real triumph in itself.

Could you please personify each object for the benefit of people blundering around trying to match the perfect gift to the right person?
Quartz blocks are the ideal gift for a healthy home. Their decorative properties are as impressive as their healing properties. Pip’s copper gentle interventions are perfectly placed on these magnificent natural found pieces. Dan’s mirrors are pancake flat (I despise wall clunk!) and really for the person who has everything ! And anyway, who wouldn’t want to see themselves the Healthier, skinnier, bronzed version! Dions trees are the most wonderful way to buy up this talented mans work at a fraction of the price. We are calling it a replacement tree, but let’s face it you would be hard pressed putting it away come January. The light and shadow plays are incredible. I am buying all 4 for a window ledge for exactly these purposes.  Joss Best’s platter has ingeniously been designed to fit a size 16 chook with a smattering of veg. It’s organic and polished all at the same time and has been stamped ‘2014’ on the back as the ultimate memory maker gift for anyone who enjoys a christmas table or feasting!

How do each of these objects represent Christmas to you?
They have all been taken from traditional shapes – the bauble (mirror); the tree (Horstman’s sculpture) the star (Pip’s incredible quartz forms) and the glue to any christmas gathering – the love of food through Joss’s practical but purposeful platter.

And finally what does an Australian Christmas mean to you?
Redleaf Beach. Freckle collecting. Pontoon swimming. Lobster. Replacing the Soda stream gas bottle (I love it!) – and The Mortons just as a five-some. This year though we are living in India for 1 month. So I am sure after Christmas in India our appreciation of all holidays will be forever changed!

Phillippa Canemolla – Mineral Blossoms
Dion Horstman – Tree Interpretations
Dan Hocking – Mirror
Joss Best – Chicken Platter

The WALLPORN collection will be available exclusively from the Space Furniture showrooms in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane from 21 November.

Credits: Photography by Françoise Baudet

Wallporn by Megan Morton for Space

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

In/Out: HAYON Studio - Room 506 At Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

Following in the footsteps of his late muse Arne Jacobsen’s ‘Room 606’, Jaime Hayón designs ‘Room 506’ at the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, Copenhagen. 50 years on, designed exclusively for the hotel, a little Jacobsen gem the Drop Chair, is the belle of the ball at this illustrious party. Re-launched by Fritz Hansen in September this year it was given a new outfit as part of Hayón’s vision for ‘Room 506’.

Formerly the SAS Royal Hotel, Arne Jacobsen oversaw all aspects of the original design in 1960, from the architectural façade down to the cutlery. Some of his most renowned furniture pieces such as the Egg chair and Swan chair were developed and went on to become design classics from this fruitful project.

“Coming from the Mediterranean, to be able to make an imprint on Danish design has been an incredibly special experience for me. The idea for this room is to create a luminous space that brings joy and genuine comfort through the Fritz Hansen designs along with some of my own designs and art.”
Jaime Hayón

This is a celebration of two brilliant designers who although from very different cultural backgrounds have a common design ethos; the appreciation of organic lines, minimalist values, fine craftsmanship and exceptional materials.

Hayón, as did his predecessor, oversaw every detail of Room 506 from the linen to the furniture. His signature Ro Armchair in dove grey, Favn Sofa in navy, Analog Tables, and decorative ceramic Bosa Table, sit handsomely on the terracotta carpet. The Drop Chair, feminine in crushed velvet, glows in the company of her new cohorts. Complementing the interior with soft light, his A-Balls Pendant and Chinoz Lamp, along with custom decorative objects embrace this traveller’s haven.

Jaime Hayón excels at inducing the same sublime serenity that Jacobsen is famous for, but adds his own playful charm. For all of you lucky enough to find yourself in Denmark it’s nice to know that both rooms are just waiting for your company.

Credits: Hayon Studio

Out/About: HAYON Studio Room 506

01_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

01_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

02_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

03_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

04_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

05_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

06_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

07_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

08_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

09_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

10_Carl-Kleiner_Floss

Architectural light fittings by Flos take on a new life under the lens of Swedish photographer Carl Kleiner in this striking geometric puzzle with plenty of personality. This is the result of a collaboration between Spanish art director Omar Sosa and Kleiner, one of the finest commercial photographers of our era.

Whether deconstructed or whole, these fittings stare inquisitively at us or peek off frame with almost robotic qualities. Each component is carefully and lovingly placed within its composition. Materiality, colour, depth of field and relief giving a sense of respectful sincerity that these perfectly engineered industrial products deserve.

Credits: Carl Kleiner

FRIDAY MUSINGS – Carl Kleiner & Omar Sosa: FLOS Architectural

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de FontevraudIn/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

1_abbay

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

Fontevraud L’Hotel is a perfect example of a pure concept realised. Patrick Jouin (industrial designer) and Jouin Manku (architect) from French studio Jouin Manku are responsible for this exquisitely refined hotel and restaurant. Located in the picturesque grounds of the Abbaye de Fontevraud, a UNESCO world heritage site in Anjou, the hotel has a wonderful sense of contemporary solace.

The regal architectural bones of each of the guest rooms are a subdued but hearty canvas. Quietly respectful of their forefathers in design, the spacious and pared-back furniture pieces are thoughtfully detailed. Clever follies of elastic banded fabric panels hold documents, the bedhead peels off the wall to allow the bedsides to run behind, and the lamps and artwork hang off refined black wall-mounted rails. It’s a beautifully detailed moment of measured consideration for the space and it’s history. The serene and contemporary palette harmonises with the ancient building fabric with its beiges, taupey greys, natural whites and timber accented with mustards, black and petrol grey blue.

The tranquil palette carries through to the common areas. Exquisite joinery in the restaurant is in dove and storm greys and caramel browns with a robust timber element in the bar. Grey browns and warm charcoals reside over the meeting room’s candle fuelled table. Additional folding chairs line the wall of the meeting room all comfortably sitting in their allocated pew. Solemn high-backed banquets are blessed by oversized copper lined timber pendants. Waiters stations curve out of walls and light radiates from the back of breakfast room loveseats.

This is an incredible example of restrained French chic. The perfect place to sip champagne, nibble on a buttery croissant, bite into a crusty baguette and sink back into the cloud that is Fontevraud L’Hotel.

Credits: Nicolas Mathéus

Out/About: Fontevraud L’Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

Furniture and houses are of course always designed in a context. I have rarely built a house where I didn’t also design the furniture. It is of course fundamental that the furniture is practical. Chairs are not designed to look at but to sit on, but of course it makes you happy, if they are also worth looking at – Finn Juhl, 1982

Danish architect Finn Juhl is now perhaps more renowned for his furniture than his architecture. Juhl worked closely with cabinetmaker and craftsman Niels Vodder to create such icons as the ‘Pelican Chair’ and the ‘Chieftains Chair’.

Juhl’s house, on the outskirts of Copenhagen is a modest abode, now open as a museum for the public to sense first hand the impact of Denmark’s design history and its significant contribution to the Scandivanian Modern period.

Inside the home, the spaces have a wonderful sense of connectivity, each one enticing and beckoning you with a promise of divine discovery. They are warm and sociable spaces that are lovingly curated. Embracing a theory he called “from the inside and out”, Juhl’s idea was that the inception of a building began with envisaging and planning its furniture. A fully furnished space could then start to determine both the spatial envelope required and thus the overall character of the architecture.

Heavily influenced by the artists of his time, Finn Juhl felt that a good designer should also build a collection that is visually eclectic but complementary. This ethos is apparent in his house where everything comes together with such harmony from the furniture pieces to the art, carpets, books, trinkets and treasures, and paint treatments. It’s a creative den, a visual feast of inspiration.

Juhl’s ‘Poet Sofa’, with its welcoming embrace is a hero piece in this picturesque home. Sitting in perfect harmony with the ‘Chieftains Chair’, both true icons conversationally face each other over a sculptural fireplace – the true heart of this home.

Credits: Finn Juhl

House of Finn Juhl

1_BELLE

1_BELLE

When Belle Magazine turned 40 this month, Arent&Pyke were honored to be part of the celebrations. We were asked to design a cover to mark this extraordinary milestone.

Take a look at our design in the November 2014 issue of Belle.

Congratulations to the amazing team at Belle and a very happy 40th birthday!
PS. You know 40 is the new 30, right?

HAPPY 40th BIRTHDAY BELLE!

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

Today we pay homage to the renowned Brazilian architect Sergio Rodrigues (1927-2014), and reflect on his contribution to Brazilian furniture design.

Most famously know for his ‘Mole’ armchair (1957) Sergio Rodrigues was dedicated to the design and production of Brazilian furniture. Strongly influenced by the Modernist movement he instilled a very distinct national style into his designs. Using local materials, he preferred to work in teak and leather. His masculine chairs are showstoppers; they are gregarious and handsome, generous in proportion and spirit. The perfect hosts, they promise you comfort like no other. You know that over time their patina will be testimonials to their true quality.

We also are great admirers of his Aspas armchair (1962), with it’s bullhorn embrace. His Mocho stool (1954) is a perfect sidekick with its cupped seat and Rodrigues’ characteristic bulbous legs. These are lovingly crafted objects, incredibly sculptured and robust in personality.

In 1955, Sergio Rodrigues created the Oca Store. This Rio de Janeiro showroom was not only a showcase of his furniture but also an important meeting place for intellectuals and artists. Doubling up as a gallery space it encouraged and promoted artistic and design endeavors.

On 15th May 2012 The Selby was invited in to Rodrigues’ studio to document this creative genius in his environment. What a beautiful shoot ensued, an inspirational visual language of intellectual wisdom and good humour. Playful bold colours are the back drop to piles of books and paper rolls. His sketches, prototypes and miniature models pepper the space.

Proud of his heritage and with a progressive energy, his legacy of furniture will be treasured for generations to come.

Credits: The Selby

Sergio Rodrigues

Top

 

Stay in the Loop!

Subscribe to our Newsletter