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Design & Interiors

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

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In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

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In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

In/Out - FREDERICK VERCRUYSSE ‘PORTRAIT OF A HOUSE’

‘Portrait of a House’ by Belgium photographer Frederik Vercruysse, is a deliciously pure and a theatrically unique documentation of a home designed by Buyse Seghers Architects. Also from Belgium, Buyse Seghers have bravely brought a fabulous old dame of a house out of retirement and it is with the soft yet dramatic eye of Frederik Vercurysse that the rich architectural poetry of the home is visualised.

Everything has context in this shoot, fueling the particularly pure characteristics and spaces of this fine home. The sublime interiors with its sage walls, wide oak floorboards, snow white backdrops and brilliantly rich red crazed marble kitchen is a perfect milieu for this carefully orchestrated play. Time and place are irrelevant in this dreamscape.

Credits: Frederik Vercruysse

Portrait of a House

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

With spring just around the corner we thought who better sit down with in their favourite chair than Richard Unsworth, Creative Director of Garden Life. It’s hard not to feel relaxed in Richard’s company – his sunny disposition and open-hearted smile are immediately appealing. It’s always a welcome reprieve to enter his lush shop of foliage on Cleveland Street, Redfern. The serenity of all that thriving greenery has an immediate soothing effect. Richard has ensured that Garden Life is not only a shop full of healthy plants and exceptional pots but that it also offers full garden design services and ongoing maintenance.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

Since 1998, Richard has been striving to bring mother nature into the homes of the inner city dweller. As his reputation for creative landscape design solutions travelled he soon found that the demand for his green thumbs outgrew his humble Darlinghurst shop. He moved to his current shop and showroom in Redfern with a café devoted to the other one of his loves, food. Richard has a team of warm natured loyal staff that are a credit to his direction.

Richard is the go-to for all that’s green in our built environment. His vast choice of plants are always exceptionally happy and his variety of vessels and decorative elements are joyfully eclectic. He understands the individual looking for a friendly fern, or the homeowner wanting their Eden realised. It is a true passion that extends past the commercial into community garden projects. Open in mind and spirit, when we caught up with Richard on a sunny day out the side of Garden Life he had a 16 year old local painting a large mural behind him. It was a super lively vibe. It’s this approachable professional personality that has seen us working with Richard on numerous projects.

Richard’s chair is a one of those unique treasures that seems to have found him, as much as he has it. With origins somewhere in West Africa it’s full of personality. The sturdy latticed base, stretched leather seat and the addition of the sheepskin just enhances the tribal craftsmanship. It’s where Richard seats his dinner guests “I’ll cook and they will tell all from the chair of truth!” oh the stories that chair has heard in its lifetime! Who built it, who brought it across the seas to end up in a little second hand shop – Dust – in Darlinghurst? It’s a seasoned seat that is a reflection of Richard’s curious nature to find the road less travelled.

Richard shares his years of experience with us in a new book ‘Garden Life’. It’s a picturesque journey full of specialist advice from the small apartment sanctuary to manicured manors. Each project is a beautiful reflection of the client and designer collaboration.

Feeling buoyant from this achievement Richard is enjoying life. He is one of those lucky people who have found their passion and is living and breathing it. Thank you Richard for taking the time out to chat with us in your chair!

Tell us about your chair? What is its story?
It’s West African, I think from Ghana or Nigeria. I found it years ago at Dust in Liverpool Street, just down the road from the old shop in Darlinghurst – I love fossicking around in there. It usually sits in my kitchen and mostly gets used when friends come round for dinner. I’ll cook and they will tell all from the chair of truth!

Proudest moment in your career?
The book thing is really, really exciting, and seeing it finally coming to fruition is definitely a high point so far (although I think it’s also my mums proudest moment, the whole of Yorkshire will soon know about it). When I first started out by myself and opened the little shop in Darlinghurst – I remember being so chuffed with that.

Your most prized possession?
It’s too hard to think of one stand out prized possession – I am a bit of a hoarder. I have a collection of old pots and planters at home that have been given to me, or that I have collected over the years – a cast iron smelting pot, French 1950’s hourglass planters, and old timber piece from Turkish travels. Winnie my old faithful dog, she is a total character and although not a prized possession is totally part of the family.

Why plants?
Each time I revisit a garden we have created after about a year or so – when there is loads of new growth and it’s starting to mature – to see plants thriving and starting to own the space around them – I always get a big kick out of that. Plants are forever changing, an integral part of life, an essential part of our existence. One of my earliest memories is sowing radish seeds with my father. As a kid we had to mow lawns and clip hedges for pocket money and I think something just stuck with me. For the fact I can make a living out of it, I have much gratitude.

King Gees or Jeans?
Jeans for sure. Can we please have Uniqlo in Sydney? Their jeans are the best, and the service is superb.

The most amazing plant ever seen is?
HUGE baobab trees recently in Botswana – some are over 1000 years old. I think its mind-blowing to think of what the tree may have seen, the events come to pass around it.

Describe your ideal studio soundtrack
Often it’s Radio National! or Something dreamy by Kate Bush/Ennio Morricone

What is the most treasured tool of your trade?
My secateurs – which I seem to use less and less… These days I can find myself sitting too much behind a desk. My hands and my eyes – where would we all be without them?

Describe your day
They are so varied, which helps keep me sane. I have taken up cycling this year, so it may be a morning ride to La Perouse or a dog walk before work, usually being at the desk by 730am. In the day I could be seeing new clients on site, discussing new products with Ebo in the store, working on current design jobs with Nick in the office. I could be re-arranging the shop, unpacking the dishwasher or jumping on a plane to go and find new adventures!

What I know about people who love plants is…
They can be a bit nutty and unique – especially people who work with them! Nurserymen are often wonderful eccentrics and I think prefer plants to people. C’mon we all love plants don’t we? We couldn’t be human beings if we didn’t.

In/Out - Chat in a Chair: Richard Unsworth

To celebrate the launch of Richard’s new book Garden Life we are asking our readers and likers to get creative with their own #gardenlife. Take a creative snap of your own garden life – the very best sunny spot in your garden, your prized collection of succulents, your little rooftop terrace, your fruitful planter of veggies, a perfectly grown fragrant rose…

Thanks to Richard and Penguin Books we have 5 copies of ‘Garden Life’ to giveaway to our best entries. The competition will be judged by Richard Unsworth & Arent&Pyke.

Tag your instagram photos with @arentpyke_inout @gardenlife_syd and #chatinachair

THE RULES
1. You must follow @arentpyke_inout @gardenlife_syd on Instagram
2. You must tag your entry with @arentpyke_inout @gardenlife_syd
3. You must hashtag your entry with #chatinachair
& #gardenlife
4. Competition opens 6am AEDST on Wednesday 27th August 2014 and closes at midnight AEDST on Tuesday 3rd September
5. The winner will be announced on Wednesday 4th October 2014 via In/Out design blog & Instagram. The judges’ decision is final.
6. Delivery of the book is only available Australia wide.
7. Full T&C’s are available here

Credits: Photography by Ben Pyke

CHAT IN A CHAIR: RICHARD UNSWORTH

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

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In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

In/Out - Hotel Hotel

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Hotel Hotel is a collaboration between designers, artists, artisans and fantasists… We love hotels, not for their swank but for reminding us of our transience and the importance of romance… We like textures and patinas that remind us of the bush, big trees, well-worn t-shirts and old wise faces that in every line reflect the enormity and joy of a life well lived… We treasure simple human interactions and making every day experiences interesting and special.

Canberra’s newest boutique Hotel Hotel is no ordinary guesthouse, but more a visionary platform for social interaction. Brothers Nector and Johnothan Efkarpidis have embarked on this ambitious project with fervour with architect Fender Katsalidis, who has orchestrated the master planning and the architectural bones of this brutalist-inspired, and March Studio who introduce the visitor to the hotel through the lobby and stair.

The hotel celebrates that inevitable extra layer of warmth we seek in the nation’s capital, a moody experience of raw materials and rich natural textures all dimly lit by very deliberate shafts of light. Hotel Hotel is a monumental roll call of Australian creatives across all disciplines and celebrates the collaborative crafts of it’s doers, curators, makers and artists.

Everywhere you go in Hotel Hotel you are met by delightful surprises. From the moment you walk into the entry foyer, which houses a small, but engaging library of loanable books on art, architecture and design your arrival to an environment that is richly curious, yet snug and welcoming is felt. Throughout the hotel, vintage pieces courtesy of Ken Neale sit side by side with vintage-inspired custom lighting silhouettes, custom-commissioned art (ranging from contemporary photographer Lee Grant to the late ceramist Gerard Havekes, whose vintage mosaic tiles were lovingly collected and curated by his daughter Anna-Maryke), boxy linen uniforms and unconventional floral arrangements.

The guest rooms read as a richly developed theatre set and it is no surprise that the revivalist approach was orchestrated by music video and advertising director Don Cameron. Each room has its own heartbeat. It’s raw, it’s rich and it’s original with anything that was not in existence dreamt up by Cameron and fabricated as editions by craftsman and artisan companies. It’s the theatrical experience you want to stay in for days on end. It seduces your sense of curiosity, beckoning you to discover all the dark recesses of its secrets.

As Efkarpidis says ‘ultimately you want the business guest, student, locals and someone travelling from the outskirts of Canberra staying with family and friends to sit down beside each other and have a conversation’. Canberra after all, is all about this collision of different identities and a good hotel is all about human interactions. We whole-heartedly felt both of these experiences at Hotel Hotel.

Credits: Hotel Hotel

OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Hotel

In/Out : Omar Sosa

In/Out: Omar Sosa 'Still Life'

In/Out: Omar Sosa 'Still Life'

In/Out: Omar Sosa 'Still Life'

In/Out: Omar Sosa 'Still Life'

In/Out: Omar Sosa 'Still Life'

In/Out: Omar Sosa 'Still Life'

In/Out: Omar Sosa 'Still Life'

Studio Omar Sosa is a Barcelona-based graphic studio headed by the man himself, Omar Sosa.

Sosa’s ‘Still Life’ series credit the everyday objects that decorate our daily life. White porcelain identities, timber tempos, glass starbursts, marble graphics, wax cities, bread acrobats, tape totems and brick highrises – we are once again reminded of how grouping of like can change the ordinary to the inspiring.

Sosa is one of the makers of the remarkable ‘everyday life interiors magazine’ Apartamento which celebrates living spaces made from living, not decorating. It is no wonder that he has a head for all that is honest and humble yet visually invigorating.

Credits: Omar Sosa

Omar Sosa ‘Still Life’

In/Out : Swedish Ninja

In/Out : Swedish Ninja
In/Out : Swedish Ninja
In/Out : Swedish Ninja
In/Out : Swedish Ninja

In/Out : Swedish Ninja
In/Out : Swedish Ninja

In/Out : Swedish Ninja

It’s hard not to fall head over heels in love with Maria Gustavsson, the delightfully distinctive designer behind Swedish Ninja, who launched her Chaotic Love Collection – an ode to daily life – at this year’s Salone Satellite in Milan. Working from her studio in the old Kockums Shipyard in Malmo Sweden (sounds nice!) these witty yet fully functional furniture pieces are total head turners!

Take one part Swedish craftsmanship with one part Italian Memphis Movement, put a super creatively observant lady at the helm and you end up with pieces such as: My Socks Table – marbled topped table with bulbous feet whose legs stop just short to reveal striped ankles (this is a reference to her kids always outgrowing their clothes); Little Darling – a two headed table lamp on a plate of marble with a perforated leather grab sleeve; and Rufus Walter Sideboard – an asymmetrical two toned green cabinet with a marbled top, pink bar handle with a beige perforated leather sleeve (swoon).

Great colour palette TICK, great form TICK, great function TICK. Want to pep up your abode? Get a Swedish Ninja in!

Credits: Swedish Ninja

 

Swedish Ninja

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With brilliantly billowing and voluminous bursts of radiance, these fellow explorers of colour and movement are a match truly made. Today’s This&That features the work of Kim Keever, a seasoned New York artist who began his practice back in the 70’s and Belgrade-born fashion designer Roksanda Ilinčić who, since starting her fashion label in 2003, has dressed some of the best.

Kim Keever’s sensuous images have been called “a hydroponic Jackson Pollock”. Having studied engineering and interning at NASA, Keever who was living in the East Village – think Andy Warhol, Grandmaster Flash and subway graffiti – ditched it all for a fishtank and a camera. These sublime images are tiny instances caught on a large format camera, the captured moments as pigment hits water, dispersing in tiny sparks and swelling plumes of colours.

About this very time Roksanda Ilinčić was born, and following her mother’s obsession with Yves Saint Laurent, she found herself – after an appropriate education at Central Saint Martins – dressing the likes of Tilda Swinton, Michelle Obama and our very own Cate Blanchett. Sculptural shapes and innovative fabrics, Ilinčić’s play on the interactions of colour in blocks, in patchworks, in facets and in confettied pixelations are  truly captivating.

Credits: Kim Keever, style.com

This & That: Roksanda & Kim Keever

In/Out: Friday Musings - Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out: Hermès Métamorphose

Never one to shy from new talent and creative exploration, french fashion house Hermés has been having some fun with French Canadian creative duo Vallée Duhamel in this little animation – ‘Hermès Métamorphose’.

With a super youthful pop, Hermès accessories and scarves are bought to life in this playful folly. Accompanied by a lively little ditty this one minute clip leaves you grinning from ear to ear.’

Credits: Vallée Duhamel

FRIDAY MUSINGS – Hermès Métamorphose

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

In/Out- OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

The walls are pink, the furniture is pink, the ceiling is pink, every thing is pink. I don’t know what to tell you, it’s a statement. – restauranteur Mourad Mazouz

Right in the heart of London sandwiched between Saville Row and Regent Street sits Sketch. A visionary dream conjured up by restauranteur Mourad Mazouz and chef Pierre Gagnaire has seen this 18th century building reinvented into a dynamic platform for food, art and music.

Every two years the main gallery restaurant space will be given to a different artist to create an installation they are given carte blanche to create. It’s an all-encompassing experience that can be enjoyed from the very comfortable confines of your dinner table.

The second installment, after Martin Creed’s 2012 installation, is a magical feasting boudoir of art and interiors created by Turner Prize winning artist David Shrigley and world acclaimed decorative architect India Mahdavi.

India Mahdavi’s monochromatic pink blush design with its plush overstuffed velvet banquettes and armchairs are delicious in stark contrast to David Shrigley’s satirical drawings that line the walls. Like little riddles Shrigley’s verbal expression also extends to the tableware. To top things off, all of the restaurtant staff are dressed by Richard Nicoll in futuristic grey boiler suits and shirt dresses.

Pass the rose petal martini please!

Credits: Sketch

OUT/ABOUT: India Mahdavi and David Shrigley at Sketch

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Last week we were thrilled to be involved with Design For Mirabel, a collaborative charity event conceived by Diane Bergeron and the Mirabel Foundation. It was a real treat to step outside our usual parameters to create a temporary installation, one where everything could be dismantled and sold.

Jane Rowe established the Mirabel Foundation in 1988 after a tragic work incident. Jane, a councillor in drug and alcohol rehabilitation received a call to say that two of her clients (single mothers) had died from overdoses. She couldn’t sleep that night for worry about what chance their kids had. She knew there was a big hole in the system for support of the next of kin, the aunts, uncles, grandparents etc. who found themselves instant parents of very troubled kids. And so the Mirabel Foundation was born and still is the only organisation in Australia specifically supporting orphaned or abandoned children due to parental illicit drug use. ‘Every child deserves a childhood’ is their mission statement, the importance of which is undeniable.

Conceptually, we wanted to express one of the most treasured aspects of being a kid, that of creative play and what better place to start than at the heart of every family home, the kitchen! From there we endeavoured to carefully jigsaw together our ‘Cubby Kitchen’.

It was so very encouraging when we got on the phone that so many wonderful businesses both large and small really wanted to get on board and understood the importance of this valuable cause.

Arent&Pyke’s kitchen was built on the principles of love, hope and belonging. It is as much a real kitchen as it is an imagined cubby of comfort and fun. On either end of the kitchen bench sat a dishwasher and a baby blue fridge from Smeg packed with Edit‘s Fruit&Veg cushions from Sparrk. Our sink became a cobalt blue ceramic platter from Jardan‘s newly launched collaboration with the Fortynine Studio, teemed up with a rose gold tap from Brodware. Hay wire tables from Cult Design became our open shelves while Design By Them Butter stools held up our benchtop. Lighty gave us our over-bench storage with their Assemblage shelves and Spence&Lyda Gras Lamps highlighted the delectable coral and peach walls from Porters Paint. Galerie Montmarte brought some fun to the party with their vintage poster, soft mascots from Leo&Bella and Kidostore kept watch over everything. And the table from Jardan was circled by Seeho Su‘s Hiroshima chairs. It all came together with the finishing touches; Mr Kitly‘s sycamore ladels and terrarium, Ottis&Otto (oh my goodness those Bridget Bodenham cups with their golden handles), Gemma Patford’s rope platters, Douglas&Bec’s Spun Pendant, Dibbern tableware and copper Stelton jug from Safari Living, Shilo Engelbrecht‘s napkins and fabric panel, By Lassen accessories from Fred International and Hay glassware from Cult Design. And who could forget our cake (which arrived just after our photoshoot) from Beatrix Bakes.

Special thanks simply must go to the endless generosity of the long-standing support of our wonderful suppliers Cult Design, Spence & Lyda, Jardan, Seeho Su, Fred International, Dedece, Brodware, International Floor Coverings and Galerie Montmartre.

It was a truly delightful experience that refreshed our minds and hearts alike. It is us (all the designers involved – it was such a pleasure), you (the sponsors), Diane Bergeron and her team (special thanks you to Carmen), the event management, the transport and venue team, the volunteers (endless thanks to the very wonderful Louise), the generosity of the public and of course The Mirabel Foundation that are bringing positive change to our society’s future, the kids. All funds raised are being used to build a purpose built home for Mirabel designed by John Wardle Architects. It will be a place of comfort, hope and support for so many. Home sweet home!

Photo Credits: Marcel Aucar Photography

Arent & Pyke: Design for Mirabel – The Cubby Kitchen

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Miles away from her day job as one half of Vena Cava – a super sassy ready to wear American fashion label – designer Sophie Buhai recently enjoyed a decorative dream residency at Villa Lena in Tuscany, fabricating stylishly serene objects with an architectural presence. A strong bond to the body they adorn, Buhai’s pieces are refined and confident ornaments in muted golds, ivory and black.

Captured on site at Villa Lena by the very talented photographer Frederik Vercruysse, the images radiate an almost Nordic sense of tranquility. Not surprisingly Sophie Buhai explained her time at Villa Lena as “Paradise!”, a place one can go to create in a society that still celebrates the daily basics of life. It is why perhaps, the materials she chose for her jewels – bronze, marble, bone and wood – have such honest hardworking qualities.

The Villa Lena hotel houses an artist residency where multidisciplinary creative talent can work for a period of two months, collaborate with other residents, mingle with hotel guests and take part in villa’s daily life, food and culture. More on the Villa Lena soon.

Credits: Frederik Vercruysse

Sophie Buhai at Villa Lena

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