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Design & Interiors

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de FontevraudIn/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Abbaye de Fontevraud

Fontevraud L’Hotel is a perfect example of a pure concept realised. Patrick Jouin (industrial designer) and Jouin Manku (architect) from French studio Jouin Manku are responsible for this exquisitely refined hotel and restaurant. Located in the picturesque grounds of the Abbaye de Fontevraud, a UNESCO world heritage site in Anjou, the hotel has a wonderful sense of contemporary solace.

The regal architectural bones of each of the guest rooms are a subdued but hearty canvas. Quietly respectful of their forefathers in design, the spacious and pared-back furniture pieces are thoughtfully detailed. Clever follies of elastic banded fabric panels hold documents, the bedhead peels off the wall to allow the bedsides to run behind, and the lamps and artwork hang off refined black wall-mounted rails. It’s a beautifully detailed moment of measured consideration for the space and it’s history. The serene and contemporary palette harmonises with the ancient building fabric with its beiges, taupey greys, natural whites and timber accented with mustards, black and petrol grey blue.

The tranquil palette carries through to the common areas. Exquisite joinery in the restaurant is in dove and storm greys and caramel browns with a robust timber element in the bar. Grey browns and warm charcoals reside over the meeting room’s candle fuelled table. Additional folding chairs line the wall of the meeting room all comfortably sitting in their allocated pew. Solemn high-backed banquets are blessed by oversized copper lined timber pendants. Waiters stations curve out of walls and light radiates from the back of breakfast room loveseats.

This is an incredible example of restrained French chic. The perfect place to sip champagne, nibble on a buttery croissant, bite into a crusty baguette and sink back into the cloud that is Fontevraud L’Hotel.

Credits: Nicolas Mathéus

Out/About: Fontevraud L’Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Finn Juhl's House

Furniture and houses are of course always designed in a context. I have rarely built a house where I didn’t also design the furniture. It is of course fundamental that the furniture is practical. Chairs are not designed to look at but to sit on, but of course it makes you happy, if they are also worth looking at – Finn Juhl, 1982

Danish architect Finn Juhl is now perhaps more renowned for his furniture than his architecture. Juhl worked closely with cabinetmaker and craftsman Niels Vodder to create such icons as the ‘Pelican Chair’ and the ‘Chieftains Chair’.

Juhl’s house, on the outskirts of Copenhagen is a modest abode, now open as a museum for the public to sense first hand the impact of Denmark’s design history and its significant contribution to the Scandivanian Modern period.

Inside the home, the spaces have a wonderful sense of connectivity, each one enticing and beckoning you with a promise of divine discovery. They are warm and sociable spaces that are lovingly curated. Embracing a theory he called “from the inside and out”, Juhl’s idea was that the inception of a building began with envisaging and planning its furniture. A fully furnished space could then start to determine both the spatial envelope required and thus the overall character of the architecture.

Heavily influenced by the artists of his time, Finn Juhl felt that a good designer should also build a collection that is visually eclectic but complementary. This ethos is apparent in his house where everything comes together with such harmony from the furniture pieces to the art, carpets, books, trinkets and treasures, and paint treatments. It’s a creative den, a visual feast of inspiration.

Juhl’s ‘Poet Sofa’, with its welcoming embrace is a hero piece in this picturesque home. Sitting in perfect harmony with the ‘Chieftains Chair’, both true icons conversationally face each other over a sculptural fireplace – the true heart of this home.

Credits: Finn Juhl

House of Finn Juhl

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When Belle Magazine turned 40 this month, Arent&Pyke were honored to be part of the celebrations. We were asked to design a cover to mark this extraordinary milestone.

Take a look at our design in the November 2014 issue of Belle.

Congratulations to the amazing team at Belle and a very happy 40th birthday!
PS. You know 40 is the new 30, right?

HAPPY 40th BIRTHDAY BELLE!

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out: Sergio Rodrigues

Today we pay homage to the renowned Brazilian architect Sergio Rodrigues (1927-2014), and reflect on his contribution to Brazilian furniture design.

Most famously know for his ‘Mole’ armchair (1957) Sergio Rodrigues was dedicated to the design and production of Brazilian furniture. Strongly influenced by the Modernist movement he instilled a very distinct national style into his designs. Using local materials, he preferred to work in teak and leather. His masculine chairs are showstoppers; they are gregarious and handsome, generous in proportion and spirit. The perfect hosts, they promise you comfort like no other. You know that over time their patina will be testimonials to their true quality.

We also are great admirers of his Aspas armchair (1962), with it’s bullhorn embrace. His Mocho stool (1954) is a perfect sidekick with its cupped seat and Rodrigues’ characteristic bulbous legs. These are lovingly crafted objects, incredibly sculptured and robust in personality.

In 1955, Sergio Rodrigues created the Oca Store. This Rio de Janeiro showroom was not only a showcase of his furniture but also an important meeting place for intellectuals and artists. Doubling up as a gallery space it encouraged and promoted artistic and design endeavors.

On 15th May 2012 The Selby was invited in to Rodrigues’ studio to document this creative genius in his environment. What a beautiful shoot ensued, an inspirational visual language of intellectual wisdom and good humour. Playful bold colours are the back drop to piles of books and paper rolls. His sketches, prototypes and miniature models pepper the space.

Proud of his heritage and with a progressive energy, his legacy of furniture will be treasured for generations to come.

Credits: The Selby

Sergio Rodrigues

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Hotel Masseria Cimino

It is the quintessential white washed walls, with their rich textures and vernacular forms, that make for the perfect backdrops to the regional objets d’art at the Masseria Cimino. A rustic, beautifully restored, and lovingly-curated guesthouse in Puglia, Italy, this family-run haven is full of history. It’s stone building blocks date back to 6th century B.C., recycled in the 1700’s to build this extraordinary farmhouse’s perimeter wall.

The hotel is honest and authentic, its fabrics simple, bed linens crisp, bed spreads locally crafted. Vine-ripening tomatoes bountifully hang between raw lightbulbs from the breakfast room. Knobbly and knotted old olive trees and cacti adorn the garden creating an endless supply of decorative foliage to bring inside. Sun loungers are covered by simple white canvas shades, brass taps float over raw stone basins, window frames are painted a subtle shade of blue and bowls of lemons abound. Roaring open fires and candlelit rooms add to the contemplative authentic simplicity, the slowing down of pace, and the purity of time spent at this ancient abode.

Set against the backdrop of the blue yonder of the Adriatic this beauty beckons to the soul a celebration of all that is the good life.

Credits: Masseria Cimino, Carla Coulson, Project Fairytale

Out/About: Masseria Cimino

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

In/Out: Michael Anastassiades For Floss

London based, Cypriot born, lighting designer Michael Anastassiades‘ new collection for Flos, String and IC, are works of lighting genius. Having launched his studio in 1994, after frustrating attempts to amalgamate into the design mould, he was now free to design and produce, a bold and courageous move for which the design world is endlessly thankful. Anastassides, now inducted into the design hall of fame with his new collection for Flos, joins their tirelessly brilliant roll call of classics.

As he puts it, “i’m interested in the instability that exists in design”, a common thread that runs though his design aesthetic. The IC collection of balanced balls are caught mid-roll or perched precariously atop a brass rod. It’s no wonder that the starting point for these was watching a street juggler at work. The name ‘IC’ is a reference to the initials that the English police use for describing the ethnicity of a person. He doesn’t expand on this point but the precariousness is undoubtedly hinted at.

The String series own their space. They are a delightful play of minimalist sculpture and brilliant functionality. First conceived by the power lines of trains, Anastassiades elaborates further about his inspiration describing the way traditional village squares in the Mediterranean are delineated by a festive string of lights. Even though they are delicate, they are striking in their volume and their division of space. The ball or cone forms of the Anastassides’ String series are suspended pure objects yet their they fine strings colonises the architectural story of the space they occupy.

We could bask in Michael Anastassiades’ luminousity for many years to come. What a treat.

Credits: Style Park, Minimalissimo, Flos, Flodeau, Larcobaleno, archiportale

Michael Anastassiades For Flos

In/Out - Studio Oink 'Memphis Calling'

In/Out - Studio Oink 'Memphis Calling'

In/Out - Studio Oink 'Memphis Calling'

In/Out - Studio Oink 'Memphis Calling'

In/Out - Studio Oink 'Memphis Calling'

German duo Lea Korzeczek and Matthias Hiller of Studio Oink are aesthetic problem solvers. Tackling anything from creative direction for print, to styling, to set design to beautifully considered interiors. ‘Memphis Calling’ pays homage to one of the most daring contemporary design movements, the Italian 1980’s Memphis group of architecture and design. Originally founded in Milan by no other than the exceptionally talented Ettore Sottsass, it’s proven to be a source of inspiration for the next generation.

Directed, styled and shot by the pair, their signature sense of tranquility has infiltrated these still lifes, bringing peace to the somewhat hectic flair that was Memphis. A soft pastel palette punctuates the serenity with vibrant orange and deep forest green. Patterns of dots, spots, geometric flowers, stripes and lace all play with one another. Objects are assembled with precise, yet haphazard order. Diagonal lines dissect the frames, jaunty angles and mismatched items all combine in their interpretation of Memphis. It’s all about the core sensibility of mischief in this modern take on a truly rouge movement.

Credits: Studio Oink

FRIDAY MUSINGS – Memphis Calling

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

In/Out - Thomas Brown 'Case Da Abitare - Hacienda'

Here’s a little bit of bold and mod eye candy from London-based photographer, Thomas Brown. Shot for Italian magazine ‘Case Da Abitare’ and aptly named ‘Hacienda’, this graphic set is a nod to the famous Manchester nightclub. We love the use of the Lichtenstein-esque primary colours and strong black lines in the street-signage-style screens. It is superhuman comic book colours, highly saturated and full of confidence. Thomas Brown means business, living large style of the 1980s with a contemporary hit of new iconic pieces from the likes of Mooi, Established&Sons, Gubi and E15.

Credits: Thomas Brown

Thomas Brown ‘Hacienda’ for Case Da Abitare

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT:  Villa Lena

Villa Lena is an Italian paradise like no other. Set in the Tuscan hills, this unique guesthouse promotes nothing but the good life. Not only does it offer a variety of accommodation but also has an in-house artist residency that fosters multidisciplinary creative talent.

The trio behind this picturesque hotel has varied but complimentary backgrounds. Lena Evstafieva is a contemporary art consultant; Jerome Hadey has a Parisian band ‘Outlines’, and Lionel Bensemoun set up Paris night club, ‘Le Baron’. As they note, “together, they wanted to bring in one place their experiences in music, art, entertainment, film, fashion and other creative fields and create a unique retreat.”

The estate is made up of a combination of buildings all clustered around the main villa, which was built by a local family, the Ferrini Del Frate, in the 18th century. The central idea being that everyone gets together on long lazy Tuscan nights for an aperitif, music and dancing. All set against the backdrop of Mediterranean hills and rolling fields.

The Villa caters to the lone ranger, lovers, friends and families with the choice of single rooms, apartments or whole villas. And then of course there is the artist’s residence where Sophie Buhai created her architectural jewellery pieces seen on In/Out not so very long ago.

The rooms, designed by Parisian Clarisse Demory, are sparse and wistful, as soft and pure as the Tuscan sunlight that pours through their windows. Minimalist, honest vintage furniture are accompanied by a fanfare of hero pieces such as the cane rocking horse or Ettore Sottsass’s ‘Tahiti’ table lamp sitting on Superstudio’s ‘Quaderna’ table from Zanotta. Floral arrangements sourced from the property’s garden complete the picture.

Everything seems to come full circle in this paradise. The grounds boast their own veggie garden and what isn’t grown on-site is locally sourced. The rooms are decorated with past resident-artists’ works. The Villa has a shop that promotes it’s in-house artistic collaborations along with a carefully curated selection of local crafts, the estate’s homemade olive oil and wine. It’s a tender project with heart and soul captured beautifully by photographers Coke Bartrina and Frederik Vercruysse.

Credits: Coke Batrina & Frederik Vercruysse for Villa Lena

OUT/ABOUT: Villa Lena

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

In/Out: The Avenue by Arent&Pyke

‘The Avenue’ is an Arent&Pyke project very dear to our hearts. We have won a number of national awards with this project and it continues to be shortlisted for many more national and international awards! The Avenue was featured in Vogue Living earlier this year and it is most certainly time to share this home in its entirety!

This 1880’s terrace in Randwick called for an update that would respect its grand heritage and uplift the spaces, revealing its beauty and creating new moments of joy. Respecting the original architecture, the success of this project relied on our ability to marry a modern family life lived within old walls with a timeless style executed in a contemporary fashion.

Once a boarding house, some rooms were stripped back to their original forms, while others were repurposed to provide a study, master robe, ensuite and bathroom. Our collaboration with the architect led to the design of new openings in the kitchen extension, and the important integration of new exterior forms with the existing envelope.

In homage to the timelessness of the existing architecture, our materials palette for the built elements was intentionally restrained. This allowed us to layer colour and texture in the decorative phase of the project. We undertook an intensively detailed curatorial design process to celebrate the grandiose architecture, harmonise the clients’ varying aesthetic and develop an eclectic yet cohesive; balanced yet unexpected; collection of spaces. When designing the spaces we worked with a range of materials, and details which complement each other to create a character for the home which is both cohesive and eclectic.

We approached the rear extension kitchen with a timeless application of classic materials and iconic pieces. White joinery, a stainless steel workbench, basalt benchtop, accents of American oak are complimented by iconic lighting from Artek to resonate with the strong black steel framed doors. Clean and uncluttered, the bold colour palette was developed in response to the clients’ much loved Enzo Mari “Apple” print.

In the formal living spaces and master bedroom, deep hues of blue and sea-green anchor the decorative schemes. Responding to the opulent scale of the bedroom, the custom-designed bed, ottoman, and antique armoire are all overly-scaled elements. Highly detailed Fornasetti wallpaper wraps through the master dressing room and ensuite, reducing the scale in these more intimate spaces with its hand-drawn appeal and whimsical cloud motif. Window treatments with accents of silk and the decorative lighting call the eye to the vast ceiling heights.

There is a recurrent preoccupation in our practice with creating spaces that are unique, individually tailored and decorative yet not over decorated. The Avenue reveals the very nature of our design process of ‘curating’ and ‘creating’, a careful balancing act. The idea of creating spaces and using finishes that could withstand the next two hundred years was importantly at the front of our minds.

‘The Avenue’ was the kind of project we always dreamt of, a unique and inspiring synergy between client, architect Tom Ferguson of TFAD and Arent&Pyke.

Credits: Photography by Anson Smart, Shoot styling by Megan Morton

THE AVENUE BY ARENT&PYKE

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