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Design & Interiors

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Miles away from her day job as one half of Vena Cava – a super sassy ready to wear American fashion label – designer Sophie Buhai recently enjoyed a decorative dream residency at Villa Lena in Tuscany, fabricating stylishly serene objects with an architectural presence. A strong bond to the body they adorn, Buhai’s pieces are refined and confident ornaments in muted golds, ivory and black.

Captured on site at Villa Lena by the very talented photographer Frederik Vercruysse, the images radiate an almost Nordic sense of tranquility. Not surprisingly Sophie Buhai explained her time at Villa Lena as “Paradise!”, a place one can go to create in a society that still celebrates the daily basics of life. It is why perhaps, the materials she chose for her jewels – bronze, marble, bone and wood – have such honest hardworking qualities.

The Villa Lena hotel houses an artist residency where multidisciplinary creative talent can work for a period of two months, collaborate with other residents, mingle with hotel guests and take part in villa’s daily life, food and culture. More on the Villa Lena soon.

Credits: Frederik Vercruysse

Sophie Buhai at Villa Lena

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

Danish architect Frederikke Aagaard has beautifully reinvigorated the Rungstedgaard Hotel near Copenhagen. By intertwining original detailing from this awe-inspiring 1917′s building with contemporary furniture and artwork Aagaard has created an elegant, timeless interior that emulates sophisticated indulgence.

Housed on a grand estate, the Rungstedgaard Hotel is a commanding manor that knows all about hospitality. Having flourished with A-list parties during the 1920s, its handsome bones have accommodated grand celebrations, solace and romance ever since.

Frederikke Aagaard has exquisitely curated modern design classics against the hotel’s generously graceful architecture. The Bouroullec Brothers’ Slow Chair by Vitra nuzzle together while on the other side of an ornate fireplace proudly sits Oscar Zieta’s Chippensteel Chair. Jamie Hayon’s Pina chairs for Magis are timelessly chic with Svenskt Tenn feature cushions paired up beautifully with Jenny Bäck’s Lean lamp.

A beautiful restrained collection of iconic treasures with a fresh palette of finishes, these good-looking interiors encourage hotel guests to sit back and enjoy all the spoils that the good life has to offer.

Credits: Frederikke Aagaard

OUT/ABOUT: Rungstedgaard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - Out/About: Casa No Tempo

Casa no Tempo translates as Timeless Home, which wonderfully sums up this uplifting Portuguese retreat. This is the place where your spirit can truly connect with mother earth, where hours and days bear no relevance and all can be forgotten except the basic essentials of harmonious leisurely living.

João & Andreia Rodrigues have not only fulfilled their grandfathers wish by maintaining the homestead and its surroundings but graciously extended the hospitality of this private sanctuary for all to enjoy.

Working closely with Architect Manuel Aires Mateus they have created a pure interior, that although minimal in nature runs parallel to its surrounds. The crisp white plush lounges and linen are akin to fresh country air. Uncluttered rooms awash in natural light correspond to the endless horizons and the handcrafted clay brick flooring are a true representation of the earth.

Humble yet exquisitely realised, this is where you go to unravel city knots. Bikes and horses are on hand to explore this nirvana, or if you’d rather stay put there’s a heavenly pool lapping away at the back door. The kitchen is a pure palette of white marble and timber, with its feasting table and open vistas it is just begging for fine grassy Portuguese wines, share plates and great company. What more could you want?

A stones throw away from Lisbon I’m sure you have to book well in advance to get your slice of this paradise!

Credits: Casa No Tempo

OUT/ABOUT: Casa No Tempo

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

In/Out - RillRill

Oregan based RillRill by Katie Freedle salutes the domestic gemstone marble in its modern day medallion necklaces. What a delightful surprise to see this common yet complex rock get its time in the sun!

In the built environment it is the natural materials that always give honesty and warmth. Stone in particular with all its intricate lines of history is what lifts the mundane to the magical so it’s no wonder that these neck charms resonate with us.

Their contemporary tribal geometry combined with their generous scale make them gallant medals. Statement ornaments combining copper, leather and marble could just as well be diamonds, gold, and chain – in our books they are one and the same.

From morning to night these rocks rock on.

Credits: RillRill

RILLRILL

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

The Ham Yard Hotel is totally stuffed with plushness. It is a vibrant home-away-from-home just bursting with the signature British Kemp cool. Kit and Tim Kemp have gone all the way once again, to ensure that The Ham Yard is a memorable den for world-weary travellers.

Each one of its 91 rooms are about comfort and energy – inviting overstuffed armchairs beckon you to take time out, while electric combinations of colour and pattern thrill the senses. Lusciously dressed with rich, personable details suh as stacked coffee books, flowers in vases, rich tapestries and buoyant artworks give you the prim and proper sense of a everything you could want from a quintessentially English homestay.

It’s this delightful attention to materiality that defines the Kit Kemp signature. Handcrafted, robust ethnic textiles sit comfortably on traditional silhouettes and heavily buttoned upholstery. Strong timber legs ground fiery fabrics and wall-hangings ranging from Indian rural scenes, to lordy portraits, to the work our very own favourite Shilo Engelbrecht, delight the roving eye. Heavy draperies ensure that the visitor is well cocooned in their abode.

It’s a typically English sense of eccentricity that we know and love that allows the confidence to layer the conservative with the outlandish with such flair. Once again, Firmdale Hotels are at the top of their game. Where do I check in?

Credits: Firmdale Hotels

Out/About: Ham Yard Hotel

Out/About: Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Mirrors at Milan

Out/About: Mirrors at Milan

Out/About: Mirrors at Milan

Out/About: Mirrors at Milan

Out/About: Mirrors at Milan

The jewels of this year’s Salone Internazionale del Mobile in Milan just keep on coming. First it was the Marni’s Animal House, then the new E15 lighting collection, followed by the genius of Dimore Gallery, then the delights of the Gubi & GamFratesi collaboration…

And our commentary doesn’t end without a moment to take in all the little mirrored treasures here, there and everywhere at this year’s Salone. Intimate in scale, these mirrors heighten the daily rituals of the time spent in front of them. The quality of the reflected light, the science of light and colour, the detail of where framing meet surface and the simplicity, is enchanting.

Norwegian designers Vera&Kyte celebrate the art and functionality of dressing and room-dividing with their ‘Apparel’. Doshi Levian’s collaged wall of finely-framed gems for HAY are almost cosmic. Bjørn van den Berg’s ‘Aura’ plays on the notion of reflection with sensibility and tactility, their solid half domed aluminium bases electroplated with reflective copper, chrome and nickel coating. The Aura is meant to fit perfectly into two open hands, a physical and emotional moment of recognition and reflection. And perhaps the most talked about is Georgian-duo ROOMS’ installation of medallion shaped mirrors with memorial textile straps in the ivy courtyard of Spazio Rossana Orlandi.

It’s a reflection on reflection.

Credits: Bjorn van den Berg, Ontwerpduo, Vera&Kyte, DESIGNISTI, no end to design, Studio WM, Nordic Days, Their&VanDaalen, Perimeter Collection, Joséphine Choquet

Friday Musings: Mirrors at Milan

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

 

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

 

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

n/Out - Out/About: Gubi & Gamfratesi

Gubi & GamFratesi – how wonderful it sounds. Rich and lyrical, almost regal; it is an arranged marriage between the design gods. Gubi, thoughtful and timelessly Scandinavian sees with its keen eye, the fruitful relationship of Danish-Italian design duo GamFratesi.

Salone del Mobile Milano 2014 saw several new additions to the Gubi & GamFratesi collection – the taller brother of the Beetle chair; the Beetle Bar Stool, the strong and sophisticated Masculo chair (now available on a swivel base), and the TS table (named after The Standard, a GamFratesi designed hotel in Copenhagen).

All three of these designs have one thing in common, their heavy bodies float weightlessly on slender frames. Whether it be upholstered shells, curvaceous masculine backs or marble tops, their fine black legs almost disappear, giving them a sense of divinity. Sitting on parquetry flooring against vivid white walls, you can truly appreciate how each piece was conceived and implemented.

Gam and Fratesi speak about this design ethos as an expression of their relationship, the marriage of the playful, full-bodied Italian spirit to the immaculate, tender-handed craftsmanship of the Danish. It is a beautiful thing to witness a married bliss as pure as this.

Credits: Gubi flickeflu

Gubi & Gamfratesi

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

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In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

 

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In Out - Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

Each time Wes Anderson makes a film, you just know you’re in for a delightful ride and this time around it is called Grand Budapest Hotel. Grasping life in all its knotted complexities, filled to the brim with colour, teeming with fastidious details, it’s a vibrant lesson in just about everything.

It’s an transportive allegory for a time when central Europe was the king of the world and when life was grandiose and layered with opulence. It’s a love story, a fairytale of loyalty, of companionship and survival. Part historical reality, part fantasy, the script is full of good humour and delicious tidbits.

The sets are plump and blooming with colour celebrating the opulence of the glory days of the Hotel before the outbreak of the war. Bold military red, fairy floss pinks and frosted whites of the hotel’s heyday then give way to faded yellows and dated mustards taking us on a colour-rendered journey. We are transported from the visual delights of the 1930s sugar-topped majestic treat of the hotel, to its sadder days of 1970s near-abandonment. Outside the comforts of the Grand Budapest, it’s all shades of grey contrasted against barren whitescapes.

It’s the details, those precious details, that we are still savouring. The signature Anderson symmetry of EVERY frame, the extremely intense close ups of the Lobby Boy’s sweat-smeared, drawn-on moustache, the perfectly formed fish waves of Madame D.’s intensely high quiff, William Defoe’s freshly scarred fist and skull-ringed fingers. It’s the nostalgic opulence and evocation of everybody’s hotel dream satisfied – the keys, the scent of ‘L’Air de Panache’, and the signature miniature cake ‘Mendl’s Courtesan au Chocolat’.

We are still licking our lips with delight.

Credits: CreativeCow Crome Yellow Hard Crimson BuzzFeed

Friday Musings: Grand Budapest Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel

In/Out - American Trade Hotel
Oozing cool, the American Trade Hotel may have had its heyday in the 60’s and 70’s, but this smoking hot revival sets to rival that benchmark. Rich in historic character while still maintaining a contemporary homely feel, it’s not hard to imagine Picasso teaching Paloma how to sculpt a bird out of a leaf in the courtyard or Tilda Swinton sipping a Martini in the bar.

Originally built in 1917, the American Trade Building at 4 stories high was and still is, the tallest building in the old town of Panama City. Lucky if you’re a guest, as every room has a view over its charming neighbouring white-washed haciendas. We can almost feel the warm fragrant air waft in as you swing open the French doors to survey the panoramic surroundings. Taking a large lungful in, you kick off your shoes and pad across the ancient timber floorboards. Everything is how it should be as you flop onto your crisp white bed realizing that the old and the new meet with perfect clarity in this thoughtfully restrained interior.

What else would you expect from the the Ace Hotels crew. The American Trade Hotel is a heady mix of texture, colour, scale and details. Dark walnuts, rich colours and clean palettes are teemed up with local flora, Bertoia wire frames and Viennese rocking chairs. The layering is sumptuous and inviting, it just reeks of good times!

The American Trade Hotel has the feel that it very well could be the new hotbed of cultural and creative hustle and bustle.

Credits: Yatzer

Out/About: American Trade Hotel

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

In/Out - Out/About: Pierre Charpin's L'Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

Well its not often we’re speechless but this installation by designer Pierre Charpin in L’Appartement No.50 within Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse really takes your breath away. The exemplary balance between colour and the purest of palettes makes one’s heart sing.

L’Appartement No.50 is one of 337 apartments within Le Corbusier’s concrete dream for a utopian society. As you can image the bones of this building are blue blood modernist, the perfect backdrop to just about anything! Let it be said Pierre Charpin is not just anything. His design sensibility is so honest and intuitive, each piece surprising in it’s exploration of form and materiality. This is no roll-out design family, it is a thoughtful gathering of old friends that sit so comfortably together. Good humoured, robust and dependable, this is a gang you want to hang with.

Charpin has incorporated pieces by his predecessors such as Jasper Morrison, the Bouroullec Brothers and Konstantin Grcic with his own pieces into this domestic theatre. His ‘Playtime’ glass sculptures, ‘Oggetti Lenti’ vases sit and ‘Crescendo’ coffee table have blood ties back to the modernist movement while his suspended ceiling sculptures, ‘Mini Eclipse’ lamp, ‘Stump’ marble side table and ‘Desa’ floor lamp are true contemporaries.

His exquisitely measured layering of the 3D and 2D are heavenly and thanks to the hospitality of No.50’s resident Jean-Marc Drut – a true patron of the arts – this rare intimate gallery is open to the public during the summer months if you are lucky enough to find yourself in Marseille.

The fantasy of setting up a temporary home in the Cité Radieuse, to feel the history of radical and cultured thinking and know that you are following in the truest legacy of our built environment is nothing short of a dream.

Credits: Wallpaper & Yellowtrace

Out/About: Pierre Charpin’s L’Appartement 50 at Cité Radieuse

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