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Design & Interiors

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

 

 

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

 

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply CompanyIn/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply Company

In/Out: Sunday Supply CompanyIn/Out: Sunday Supply CompanyVintage flowers, animal prints and classic stripes, soft cotton tassels and lightly varnished beachwood handles, a very generous canopy and custom hardwares; these beach umbrellas by Sunday Supply Co. – which mark the Australian brand’s debut collection – are truly beautiful and wonderfully practical.

The five unique prints – playfully named Natural Instinct, Black Sands, Jungle Canopy, Animal Kingdom and Summer Deck – are all perfectly suited to the beach, blending in and reflecting the summery atmosphere they’ll sit in. Whether it’s the vintage floral or the tropical jungle, the stripes or loose spots, each design is done in a warm, gentle colour palette and the pattern kept simple. And while there is a definite vintage tone giving the umbrellas that lovely lived-in look, they’re also equally fresh.

The actual working of the umbrellas’ design is of course the other factor we’re drawn to. Not only pretty, these umbrellas are made to last – obviously the design of true-beach goers who know the strength of the Australian sun and that the accessories will be used and used again. Sunday Supply Co. has opted for only premium quality fabric (UPF30+) and custom designed hinge mechanisms and hardware. The pole is simple and collapsible, designed to cover all angles and be manoeuvred with ease, and each umbrella has its own carry bag for convenience. Yes, these boutique umbrellas tick both boxes; Sunday Supply Co. certainly know how to do summer.

Credits: Sunday Supply Co.

Sunday Supply Co.

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

In/Out: M2Malletier's Studio

M2Malletier bags are strong. They’re characterised by geometric shapes and definite lines, bold blocks of colour and, perhaps most significantly, distinctive barlike hardware designed by Melissa Losada Bofill and Marcelea Valez. The space – and only space – in which the signature handbags are designed is even more so. M2Malletier’s studio is housed in ‘La Fabrica’, a postmodern masterpiece – a statement in futuristic design and incredible engineering crafted by Ricardo Bofill (father of Losada’s husband, Pablo), widely considered one of Europe’s seminal postmodernists.

Known as perhaps his signature architectural achievement, La Fabrica was originally a concrete factory and was renovated by Bofill in the 1970s to house his family and his international architectural practice, ‘Taller de Arquitectura’. In line with his other public works, such the Barcelona Airport’s Terminal 1 and various hotels of stunning magnitude including the Costes K in Paris, La Fabrica’s 32,000-square-foot space is dramatic, brutal and romantic, quite arresting on the whole.

As a start, it’s the copious amounts of concrete that grab your attention – an industrial material that is strong in every sense of the word. Then there are thee ceilings, reaching 30 feet in some places and creating the most generous of spaces to wander through, almost overpowering if one were to be alone in them. There are also windows inspired by ancient roman arches dotted everywhere, allowing light to stream into the rooms and land on the walls, and from the exterior punctuate the raw concrete façade. Around the building are giant spouts which once poured concrete, giving the structure its extraterrestrial feel, ivy now sprouting from the cracks that add to the surrealist tone.

The space isn’t all hard brutalist lines though. Inside, and in the corner in which M2Malletier have their studio, the building brutalist concrete lines are softened by luxurious fabrics, accessories and furniture – a white lounge sits on dusty blue carpet, there are plants and books, paintings and warm wood. The most dreamy addition though has to be the curtains, billowing ivory floor-to-ceiling sheets of fabric that give the space a mystical kind of charm against the strength of the architecture.

As a setting for the handbag studio it’s perfect too – the combination of architectural and historic references and minimalist design fitting well with the pair behind M2Malletier, Melissa Losada Bofill and Marcelea Valez, whose design aesthetic is structured and simple, calling on the past as well as looking to the future. “We were inspired for our hardware by strong, basic things as well — industrial shapes, medical instruments and medieval tools,” says Losada Bofill, “and we are also very serious about engineering and balance.” But not only is working amid Brutalist grandeur on such scale “inspiring and a bit extraterrestrial” for the pair now, but it helped inform the entire brand. ‘‘Every bag I have ever designed has been sketched at La Fabrica,’’ says Losada Bofill. ‘‘Even before we had a formal company, wandering around this place made me want to create.’’

In the end, it’s a beautiful story that goes full circle, where history and architecture, family and fashion merge, and the magical La Fabrica is the glue that holds it together.

Credits: The New York Times Style Magazine
Photography: Danilo Scarpati

M2Malletier & ‘La Fabrica’

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

In/Out: Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby

Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby’s, of Barber & Osgerby work is definitively English in the way that all of Europe is gathered in London – you can see German clarity, an Italian flourish, and Danish purity in their pieces. It’s no surprise then that these talented gents met while studying at the Royal Academy of Arts, a worldly melting pot of artistic genius.

Their forms tend to be sensual and understated, begging to be touched they are invitingly ergonomic. Warm materiality with neutral colour palettes that are punctuated with rich hues in blue and red, their objects make for very compatible relationships allowing for furnishing flexibility. Take the ‘Tobi-Ishi’ table for example; perfect as a minimalist showstopper or just at home heavy with objet in a maximalist’s abode.

Although their furniture and objects read like an A-list of accomplishments they also find the time to support their other interests through ‘Map’ – industrial design and ‘Universal Design Studio’ – interior design and architecture. Humble and humorous to the core they have been noted as saying that their ‘Tab’ lamp for Flos is one of their favourite pieces due to it’s affordability, and therefore availability to the everyday people.

Credits: Barber & Osgerby

Barber & Osgerby

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

IN/OUT: Alex Hotel by Arent&Pyke

Located within the cosmopolitan and developing cultural landscape of Northbridge in Perth is the Alex Hotel; a joyous collaboration between Perth-based architects Spaceagency, interior designers Arent&Pyke, and the hotel’s passionate founders.

Conceptualised as ‘Hotel as Home’, Alex Hotel is a place to find freedom, solace, intimacy and connectedness that is tailored to the individual; celebrating the stories they bring with them to the hotel. Always present is a longstanding understanding of the familiarity of ‘Alex’; a treasured old friend with a house full of wonderment who guides the guest through the hotel, welcoming them into their home. The interior design, furnishing and styling imagines the richness of that personality, with a sense of frivolity and the layering of a story.

The public spaces are bright, casual and lively, a reflection of the ethos of the Alex Hotel, representing a commitment to the daily rituals of our lives to rest, feed and nourish, in the morning and evening as its surfaces and spaces transform throughout the day. They also celebrate the act of coming together, yet the layered experience of furniture and furnishings provides us with solace if we so seek it. Seats are individually enveloping or bountifully communal. Tables are single scale to nest daintily beside us or vastly generous. The casual nature of ‘perching’ at bar surfaces brings a sense of comfort to the majority of the hotel’s guests; single travellers, while the multiple communal tables nurtures opportunities for communal interactions, recalling a familiar domestic typology and an invitation to serve one’s self, drawing guests to its vast surfaces and bountiful offering.

Entering the hotel, the foyer is unstructured yet not unclear, it’s front desk uncharacteristically turned 180 degrees to allow guests and staff to mill beside one another around a communal desk. Beside it, a black mohair velvet Swedish vintage loveseat welcomes guests, above it a large scale commissioned weaving by LA based, WA born artist Ben Barretto.

The ground floor cafe is dominated by a very large custom made shared dining table accompanied by a large communal banquette with three small lounging tables, a small coffee cart and three small café tables. Responding to the bold, almost industrial language of the architecture and the scale of the hotel’s spaces, the cafe mediates the compressed rigour of the hotel rooms and the dramatic release to generous communal spaces.

Defined in two zones, one, the mezzanine bar is wrapped on three sides by a double-height void, conceived as a single communal bar surface accompanied by an outdoor terrace and small lounge. The other, the mezzanine lounge, is conceived as a sitting space with dining and lounging accompanied by smaller outdoor terrace, and a library. Functionally responding to the requirements for a breakfast space for guests, it also transforms into a bar and casual dining space in the evening with an honesty bar system for an afternoon aperitif.

The Alex Hotel bedrooms are richly painted from floor to ceiling for an immersive experience of colour, a little room of respite; serene, yet invigorating. One single colour is rolled out across all rooms of each of the five levels of accommodation – from dusty pink, to mustard, deep navy, sage green and dirty lilac, each with a contrasting hallway colour. Rigorously planned by Spaceagency, Arent&Pyke have furnished the rooms with a bespoke plywood and quilted bedhead upholstered in Dior maestro Raf Simons’ collection of fabrics for Kvadrat. Each is modestly accompanied by a custom made black steel hanging rail, hanging mirror, a linen and leather utility bag and a plywood storage seat lovingly manufactured  by New Zealand based father/daughter duo Douglas & Bec.

The roof terrace invites guests to enjoy the sunsets over the CBD from the comforts of custom daybeds and loungers while the conference/function room offers a relaxed atmosphere, its billowing linen curtains floating softly in the breeze revealing the beauty of the sun-drenched Perth skyline.

Comprised of a layered palette of bespoke joinery pieces in birch plywood, bold marble and terrazzo responds to the rigours of the architecture, with an honest, utilitarian sense of surface. Softened by bespoke upholstery, textural and layered tonal fabrics, iconic furniture pieces and ambient lighting, with a sophisticated collection artworks from Artbank, the Alex Hotel invites all in to experience its joys.

Credits:
Interior Design: Arent&Pyke

Architecture: Spaceagency
Photography: Anson Smart

ALEX HOTEL BY ARENT&PYKE

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

In/Out - Hotel Vernet by Francois Champsaur

On its 100-year anniversary, originally built under the French civic planning of Georges-Eugène Haussmann, the historic Hôtel Vernet hotel has undergone a significant renovation by interior designer François Champsaur and it’s an absolute work of art.

Taking the old building, which sits between the Place de l’Etoile (Charles de Gaulle) and the prestigious Golden Triangle district, the French designer has created a space of elegance and artistry, boasting in equal measure the modern aesthetic and French sophistication. It’s a combination that, while not new to the designer having worked on various luxurious hotels and a number of homes of art collectors’, is done with great skill. Bold colours are used in a way that complement perfectly the decadence of rich materials while energetic patterns sit comfortably with fine lines.

Each detail – whether it be furniture or fittings, paint colours or floors – speaks somehow to both modern art and French elegance at once. Art in the obvious sense, that is, paintings, are not only on the walls but also find expression on the floors in the form of simply fabulous rugs, becoming art works in themselves, and are found also on the ceilings (with fresco by French visual artist Jean-Michel Alberola commissioned). The furniture is wholly modern with its minimal form but elegant in material and the choice of colours are bright yet not gaudy, contemporary while also oozing class. The copper bar feels fresh but sleek, while marble table-tops oscillate between simple geometric shapes and sinuous curves which defy their very materiality. Of course, we cannot forget the monumental stained glass dome. Designed by Gustave Eiffel, the impressive glasswork is certainly a generous nod to French workmanship and classic design, but, as it hovers over a very minimal dining area, nestles itself into the modern tone.

All in all, the Hotel Vernet blends two distinct eras and aesthetics together beautifully, paying respect to both and being something truly unique in its own right.

Credits: Hôtel Vernet via Yatzer

Hôtel Vernet

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Last year stylists Vanessa Traina and Morgan Wendelborn opened The Apartment New York, an offline extension of their online store, The Line, which we all went a little crazy over (imagine the most sophisticated and beautiful New York loft style apartment filled with the most covetable objects, all which you can purchase then and there). This year, they opened one in Los Angeles – equally attractive and filled with equally gorgeous products – which span the categories of fashion, home, beauty, and art – but also something of its own, particular to the flavour of Los Angeles.

While the pair have kept The Line’s focus at the heart of The Apartment Los Angeles – pulling together refined, versatile and honest goods in a real, more personal context – and generally the same as the New York store in aesthetic and tone, their new shop-able boutique/apartment is designed with LA in mind – its vast, sprawling nature, a slightly more relaxed way of life, the open boulevards.
Still situated on the second floor – to maintain the intimate feeling of home that is difficult to achieve on retail street level, this time The Apartment is on a tree-lined street, Melrose Place in West Hollywood to be precise, and more spacious than its sister in New York. Split between two lofts, which comprise a large kitchen, a dining room, living room and study, a dressing room, wardrobe, bath and bedroom, the space is also lighter and brighter, and has been envisioned as a place of connection in order to combat the sheer size of LA.

In terms of product, there’s also a slightly lighter tone and the mix of objects and clothing (which are truly exquisite) blend Los Angeles’ modernist heritage and climate with its glamour. There is lighting by Atelier de Troupe and vintage objects, Fritz Hansen furniture and books, clothing by Protagonist, J.W. Anderson and Lemaire, beauty products by Rodin and Sunday Riley. There are even some pieces specifically available in Los Angeles (Traina and Wendelborn have been working with some local vendors). Otherwise, it’s the same level of quality and beauty, function and honesty in every thing The Apartment houses. Like New York, The Line’s Los Angeles boutique is nothing short of perfect. A very impressive project indeed.

Credits:THE LINE
Photography: Hanna Tviete & Thomas Slack

The Apartment LA by The Line

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon Studio 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon Studio 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon Studio 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon Studio 'The Jane Restaurant'

In/Out: Piet Boon 'The Jane Restaurant'

The Jane is Michelin-star chef Sergio Herman and chef Nick Bril’s new restaurant in Antwerp designed by Piet Boon. It is grand and sophisticated, contemporary and cool, and designed down to the finest detail, sparing nothing when it comes to material. In their words, it’s “fine dining meets rock ’n roll”.

Housed in what was the chapel of a former military hospital, the high-end restaurant has an immediately magical appeal; huge windows and high ceilings, the generous application of rich and natural materials, fine furniture and perfect details – it’s all there.

Where the original altar sat, for example, is now the kitchen, embraced by glass like ‘a modern shrine’ and on display for guests to watch the magic happen; the windows (designed by Studio Job) are inspired by the chapel’s original function and the old stained glass window, but taken to a very contemporary place, where obscure objects – foam spatulas, sunflowers, devils, skulls, babies, Jesus on the cross, dice, apple cores, wrenches, ice cream cones, a canon, croissants, penguins, trophies, gas masks and birthday cakes – celebrate the contemporary place to worship. In the centre of the restaurant is a 800 kilogram chandelier of over 150 lights, designed by the Beirut-based design studio PSLAB and impossible not to be impressed by.

For the tableware they’ve gone for a high quality bone white porcelain collection, designed by Piet Boon in collaboration with Belgian company SERAX, which combines functionality and design; for the floors they’ve saved the original pottery floor tiles; the tables are bold black circles; the seating, decadent pale green velvet armchairs; the bar upstairs a sold slab of marble.

It is these fantastic additions and use of materials that really bring The Jane into its own, turning what is an already incredible space into something new and exciting, whilst at the same time paying homage to what was. Rather than simply restore or change entirely, Piet Boon Studio and all those they’ve collaborated with have created a fusion of old and new and a space that has a serious amount of energy and style.

Credits: Piet BoonYatzer & Archdaily
Photography: Richard Powers, Rahi Rezvani

Piet Boon ‘The Jane’

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Brian Thoreen

In Brian Thoreen’s work, material is the master. Fusing art and design, having worked in the fields of fashion, architecture and art, the Los Angeles-based designer uses the material’s nature as prime inspiration, letting the form emerge organically through making. Paired with exceptional craftsmanship, it’s an a approach that makes for a playful and contemporary, very slick collection that could easily take centre stage in a room.

In the Rubber Credenza, fluid handles protrude from the body seamlessly – making use of the malleable nature of rubber, and precise sheets of brass break up the main structure – the decadent quality of brass becoming a perfect accent. Between the soft matt finish of the main form and the luxury touches of brass it’s a satisfying contrast of materials.

For the Growth Table, brass inspires in a different way. This time, along with its tactile nature and ability to be polished to a beautiful shine, it’s the solidity of the metal that is celebrated. The chunky, straight forms that are the legs become fluid as they open out to a bloom-like shape, one part blending into the other and then back again. Spontaneous and sleek at the same time, the table shows just what can be done with this material when you let its qualities play out organically.

Then there’s the Mixed Marble Coffee Table – the stone inspiring various geometric shapes depending on the patterning, or the Torpedo Chandelier, clean and almost space-like in form. Whatever piece it is of Thoreen’s, whether one of the more fluid or the more rigid – or more likely one that encompasses both, tactility and form always stand out. Well-executed and truly original, these are design pieces that pay tribute to material wholeheartedly and do so quite perfectly at the same time.

Credits: Brian Thoreen

Brian Thoreen

In/Out: Bonnemazou Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Bonnemazou-Cambus

French hardware brand Bonnemazou-Cambus are newcomers to the scene, and like any set of new eyes, unburdened with tradition, they bring a breath of fresh air. Their door handles are playfully youthful, with four handles, five back plates, and numerous colour combinations they offer a fabulous array of graphic and compositional choices.

Manuel Bonnemazou and Agnés Cambus of design studio Elements-S, the duo behind Bonnemazou-Cambus, are stylistically energetic and colourful. Their product design is humorously spirited and homogenously coloured, resulting in curvaceous, visually soft objects.

They dismantled the door handle into the pin, the handle, and the finish and with this simple approach realised how they could create a contemporary take on the door handle. Their collection pops with life, voluptuous pear shapes, cutouts, lattice and clouds these openers are for the young at heart.

Credits: Bonnemazou-Cambus

Bonnemazou-Cambus

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem

In/Out: Object and Totem
The wholesome goodness of Brooklyn based ‘Object and Totem’ is expressed in grainy textured reciprocals and buoyant baubles. With a leant towards the ceramics of the 70’s these beauties have a contemporary twist that although fluid, is more refined, and far less gaudy.

Speckled and freckled, each piece subdued tonally has affectionate characteristics. The ‘Loop Urn’ is garnished with symmetrical nodules that create a rhythmic quality, while the pirouetting frill neck of the ‘Smoke Ring Doorknob’ visually levitates the base. Burnt fibers haphazardly scrawl across soft glazed surfaces, uncontrolled graphics on an otherwise perfect vessel.

Julianne Ahn the lady behind ‘Object and Totem’, formally trained in textile design, found her love for clay in 2007 while taking classes at the Clay Studio in Philadelphia. A happy chance encounter that evolved into ‘Objects – vessels – and Totems – jewellery’, illustrates how life is forever offering us up opportunities.

Credits: Object and Totem

Object and Totem

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