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Design & Interiors

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The Hotel Covell in Los Feliz, the epicentre of Los Angeles’ east-side hipster scene, has been called a modern day descendant of the Chateau Marmont, born with old soul. Set within a 1930s building over bar owner and entrepreneur Dustin Lancaster’s Bar Covell and designed by Sally Breer of Co-Mingle, the five-room hotel is a snapshot of five chapters in the life of a fictional bon-vivant writer character named ‘George Covell’. Loosely shaped by the collective stories of Lancaster & Breer’s own lives, Covell’s fictional tale is narrated from room to room starting in his hometown Oklahoma journeying to New York, with a brief sojourn to Paris and to his adventures beyond.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter One, called the ‘Oklahoma Room’, imagines George Covell’s rustic and earthy hometown and is inspired by the Mid-West with its humble sense of comfort, recycled timber and aged leather.

Chapter Two, the ‘1950s NYC Flat’, takes us to Covell’s new found world of industrial and functional rigour. Modernist design inspirations (the design of Room 02 is so very Charlotte Perriand) share the stage with iconic midcentury design classics by the likes of Charles and Ray Eames.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter 3, ‘A Parisian Atelier’ imagines the lodging of Covell’s girlfriend with soft textures and a bohemian feminine sensibility. A blush pink Eileen Gray Bibendum chair alludes to the romance of Covell’s 1970s Parisian dalliance.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The richly layered, palette of Chapter Four ‘Supreme’, finds our character George Covell adding to his collection with travels far and wide to Monaco and India.

His story, concludes with Chapter Five ‘The Heir’, envisaging the apartment Covell’s Paris-raised daughter inhabits, surrounded by her father’s life-long collection of treasures, back in New York city in the late 1970s and ‘80s.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Credits: Sally Breer & Hotel Covell

HOTEL COVELL

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

Spring Restaurant is a family affair with the kind of familiar warmth and ambience one might expect from the former Vogue food editor Skye Gyngell in this, her first time solo venture. Designed by Gyngell’s sister, Sydney-based interior designer Briony Fitzgerald, Spring has a layered, feminine elegance which sits with charm and poise within the New Wing of the iconic neo-classical Somerset House in London.

There is an ease to the elegance and a purity to the focus at Spring. Food “is celebrated for its conviviality and the joyfulness of sharing seasonal produce”, a simple philosophy which extends through the interior design to enrich the experience of dining. Statement pieces of furniture and lighting are allowed their space giving the visitor time and serenity with which to contemplate the beauty of each piece over the fussiness of excessive detail.

The light-flooded white walled room with large arched windows and lofty ceilings have been dressed with a carefully curated palette of saddle leather, soft grey blue, brass, copper and baby pinks. Atop the wide danish oak floors sits a roomful of the iconic Cassina Cab chair, in their tanned perfection, eagerly awaiting the patina of time. Bookending the main dining space are a line of Mayor sofas by Danish architects Arne Jacobsen and Flemming Lassen in dark grey/brown and in pink delicately, paired with e15’s Habibi tables. The bar’s bold book-matched marble is framed by Vico Magistretti’s gold Atollo lamps and New York based Apparatus Studio’s hand-blown glass Cloud chandeliers.

Gracing the walls of Spring are works by esteemed British artists. ‘Peonies’, created by gilded glass artist Emma Peascod is a five panelled 22ct gold leaf, silver leaf and Japanese paper piece which announces the entrance area while Valeria Nascimento’s delicate white porcelain ‘Blossoming’ of flower motifs in various states of opening scatter the soft blue grey walls of the main dining room.

Within the centre of Spring is a beautifully serene garden atrium, an oasis of calm by acclaimed garden designer Jinny Blom. The walls of the atrium lined with panels, each bearing the fossil-like form of a huge Gunnera manicata leaf. Blom describes her intervention as “mineral-like, stony, cool, green and as natural as possible… a hint of a grotto or a ruined castle”.

The casual boxy shift dresses, delicate stripes, small black ribbons and canvas plimsolls of the uniforms by celebrated designers Egg and Trager Delaney celebrate the simplicity and the sophistication of how best to achieve a considered sense of grace and style.

Spring is honest, heartfelt, wholesome elegance at its best.

Image Credits Via: Spring Restaurant Studio Peascod Yatzer and Escapade with photography by Paul Massey and Tom Mannion for Vogue Living

SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In an ongoing fruitful relationship between Milano design studio Studiopepe and furniture showroom Spotti Milano, ‘Home Couture’ comes to life. With that quintessentially Italian sense of opulence, ‘Home Couture’ is warm, sincere and unapologetically grandiose.

Hand-picked design heroes, the ‘Lucrezia’ sofa and ‘Febo’ chaise by Maxalto, the Corbusier ‘LC2’ armchair, Classicon’s ‘Bell’ table and Serge Mouille’s ‘Lampadaire 3 Bras’ make for a perfect tête-a-tête in the living room. The library party of the ‘Freud’ daybed and Carl Hansen ‘CH25’ chairs is presided over by the B&]B Italia ‘Flat C’ wall system. The dining room with ‘Pathos’ table and ‘Recipio’ console by Maxalto keep company with Knoll’s ‘Conference’ table and ‘Platner’ chairs.

The stone clad textured walls by Salvatori create a lavish backdrop and fabric panels and generous drops of velvet curtains in blush and peacock blue add to the vertical drama of the spaces.

Rich, yet restrained, ‘Home Couture’ is Italy at its tailored best, complimenti Studiopepe!

Credits:Studiopepe
Photography by Silvia Rivoltella

‘Home Couture’ By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/Out: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

Brooklyn based ceramicist Natalie Weinberger‘s collection of earthenware is lovingly articulated. There is a considered architectural sensibility, each piece looking ergonomically snug, with a scale perfect for the grasp of human hand.

Having experimented with glass blowing from an early age, it was whilst studying the art of historic preservation that Weinberger enrolled in an undergraduate ceramics course and from there, as they say, ‘the rest is history’. Weinberger credits her former studies with an ongoing interest in referencing past forms. It goes without saying that she finds a wonderland of sculptural forms in ceramics, perhaps the earliest form of artistic and functional expression in civilised society. Although her stoneware clay is rustic in nature, she coaxes very refined shapes from it.

The styling of Weinberger’s pieces is poetic, soft and dreamy, the peppered surfaces reflecting their materiality. There is a beautiful duality of the whole and the deconstructed when the pieces are viewed together against that artisanal mosaic backdrop.

Arched vases, splattered platters, morning coffee cups drip fed with delicately coiled handles and sweet dumbbellesque objet d’art, there is a bohemian refinement to Weinberger’s creations.

Credits: Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

Natalie Weinberger Ceramics

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/out: PALETTE: Clay & Earth

Deep in the soul, bound in history, rich in nutrients is Clay & Earth. Irresistibly tactile, this Palette has a hearty earthiness and a patina that benefits from warm hands, the fiery heart of a kiln, the bleaching of sun and the test of time. Sandy whites, tan, ochre, terracotta, rust, charcoal and dirty greens of wholesome goodness, these are sacred materials borrowed from the core to remind us of our mortality.

Shaped into robust, hearty, sincere objects with muted surfaces smooth to the touch, or powdery soft under fingertips. These items, aged and worn have their own heartbeat, when introduced they immediately alter the ambiance of a room.

They are what we naturally gravitate towards; they balance the built and the synthetic with their texture and depth of hue. Comforting in the impermanence of all, they will one day return from the very clay and earth from whence they came.

Credits:
1. Flickr: Tiagø Ribeiro
Enrique Palacio via Architectural Digest Nic Lehoux via Architectural Digest Archiproducts source unknown Architectural Digest
2. Folk About Bungalow Classic Indré The Tribeca Penthouse source unknown Apparatus
3. Desire to Inspire Faith Interior Oliver Gustav Studio Tiziana Tosoni Australian Traveller
4. Somewhere I Would like to Live source unknown Chevrenoir Bjøkheim Norm Photography

PALETTE: Clay & Earth

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: QUITOKEETO

Quitokeeto’ is the brainchild of San Franciscan duo Heidi Swanson and Wayne Bremser, a beautiful curation of kitchen tools and accessories that are simple, honest and full of soul. In copper, timber, steel, cast iron and ceramic, these are classic, robust pieces; some which have remained unchanged for generations simply because their functionality and materiality is unbeaten.

Those of us who seek solace in the kitchen treasure our trusty tools and the inherent sense of intuition they bring to the way we cook for those we love. The density of a pot, the breadth of a good chopping board, and the weight of a knife; as individual as the hand that holds them. There is something about the meeting of produce and authentic cooking utensils that is so essential to the most basic, and yet the biggest joy of life.

Quitokeeto enhances the ceremony of food and the celebration of a simple yet beautiful life.

Credits: Quitokeeto/span>

ONLINE FINDS: QUITOKEETO

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

In/Out: CABINET

Danish design studio Cabinet’s collection of furniture and display objects in coloured glass, with fine painted timber frames are youthful in their pretty uniqueness. With a strong graphic nature, it’s no wonder that these gems are a joint partnership between cabinetmaker Lea Holtoug and graphic designer Molly Kyhl.

Cabinet’s display boxes and cabinets are oversized treasure boxes awaiting cherished objects to shadow their tint with. It’s the mixture of unexpected colours and the scale that makes these exceptional objects so very precious.

Credits: CABINET

CABINET

In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

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In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

Dripnew-001

In/Out: Driptopia - Iggy & Lou Lou

Made in the spirit of ancient vessels ‘Driptopia’ from Melbourne based porcelain design studio Iggy & Lou Lou, are true to their name. Lashings of porcelain and paint are allowed to run, creating gravitational decorative surfaces.

Irene Grishin Selzer and Peter Selzer, the husband and wife team behind Iggy & Lou Lou, specialise in one off objects and jewellery. The base material of ‘Driptopia’ is made from a combination of porcelain and quartz, resulting in a luminescent blank canvas ready for their graphic touch. Strong black patterns with touches of cobalt blue and forest green adorn the vessels giving their otherwise antiquated form new life.

Credits: Iggy & Lou Lou

 

DRIPTOPIA – IGGY & LOU LOU

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

In/Out: SANIYO

Hong Kong-based Saniyo specialises in good-natured ceramics with their ‘Gathering Series’. These minimalist pieces, never lacking in personality with their peachy pinks, canary yellows and watery turquoises are a joyful expression of the mood when good meals are shared between the people we hold dear.

The sizing is decidedly modest, hinting at the re-filling of your plate or cup again, and again, with shared dishes as meals stretch out over a sunny afternoon.

Delightful and delicious Saniyo’s ‘Gathering Series’ is for the lovers in this world.

Credits: SANIYO

SANIYO

InOut: Serge Castella's Mediterranean Guest House

InOut: Serge Castella's Mediterranean Guest House

InOut: Serge Castella's Mediterranean Guest House

InOut: Serge Castella's Mediterranean Guest House

InOut: Serge Castella's Mediterranean Guest House

InOut: Serge Castella's Mediterranean Guest House

InOut: Serge Castella's Mediterranean Guest House

The ‘Mediterranean Guest House’ by Spanish designer Serge Castella is a heady mix of rustic chic. The bare building bones are naïve, whitewashed and homogenous. The bamboo-lined ceiling creating warmth throughout. Castella’s gift is bringing a myriad of styles and eras together to create a space that is sincere and cosy.

Part-French country house, part-Hawaiian hacienda, part-Indonesian villa with touches of 1970s post modernism, this split personality guest house is light and inviting.

Credits: Serge Castella

Serge Castella’s Mediterranean Guest House

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