Categories

Design & Interiors

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai ObjectIn/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

In/Out: Sophie Buhai Object

Objects – “Curated and Designed” is a compilation of absolute treasures fom LA’s Sophie Buhai. Her eye for extraordinary objects and fine furniture is exemplary – thumb indented glass bowls, marble caressed into form, and chairs poised with character – a balanced collection full of soul, handcrafted, considered, and delivered with pride.

An eclectic mix of vintage and modern laced with Buhai’s own striking jewellery – harmoniously just at home next to a double ended Ikebana vase than worn on a wrist. The pedigree is not the focus here, an the unknown wooden timber sculpture nestles with Nathalie Du Pasquier’s Memphis napkin rings, Buhai’s collection not about the name but about the inherent emotion and depth discovered in each object.

When you view her collection it’s like stumbling upon the most fabulous flea market. Behold the beauty.

Credits: Sophie Buhai

Sophie Buhai Objects

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

There are some people that seem to posses a particularly special quality. Something you may not be able to put your finger on instantly, but that you sense as soon you meet them. Nicky Lobo is one of these people. Meeting this creative woman, the now-Editor of Habitus Magazine, leaves you feeling calm, inspired and a little closer to what matters. Of course, as someone who has seen (and sat on) her fair share of designer furniture, we were especially keen to hear what her chair of choice was.

With the aim of Chat in a Chair being to celebrate the importance of collecting objects and shed light on why it’s such an individual pursuit, Nicky is a perfect interviewee. She reminds us that in each object is a wealth of opportunity that reaches far beyond the object itself – if you’re willing to discover it.

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO
Despite holding the much sought after title of Editor to one of our (your/everyone in Australia’s) favourite design magazines, Nicky ‘stumbled into the design world’. Working as a studio assistant in the interiors department at Group GSA, she decided to apply (and was accepted) for the Advanced Diploma of Interior Design through TAFE at the Design Centre Enmore. What she realised (and which makes sense if you know Nicky and her inquisitive mind), is that it was the ‘talking and thinking about design’ that she liked most. In true Nicky style, she followed her gut and went on to study Communications at UTS with a major in Writing & Cultural studies.

“It was then that I had a brainwave and thought I could combine my interests and write about design,” she says, “so I approached Indesign for some work experience.” Working with then-Editor Dr Paul McGillick and then-Deputy Editor Andrea Millar on Habitus from its inception means Nicky has seen and been part of a major project through its development.

The richness we see in the pages of Habitus today can be traced back to a strong idea at the beginning and a passionate team working on it, but also to Nicky and her integrity. Nicky isn’t about quick fixes or ‘instant gratification’ when it comes to discussing design, but about creating conversation that is accessible in ‘an intelligent and meaningful way’. Behind all those pages of beautiful words and images, which flow effortlessly from start to finish, is hours of planning and careful consideration.

When it comes to her chair of choice, Nicky’s answer is equally meaningful. Though as much as her eye for quality design and interest in the subject influenced her choice, it is clearly her love of yoga (and the floor) that made The Togo, from Ligne Roset, winner. This chair, she tells us, embodies the idea of ‘play’. “I believe we are at our most creative and productive when we are relaxed, comfortable and having fun,” she says. “The Togo encourages all of this. You can curl up on it and read, squash up next to your best friend on it, lay on the ground with your legs up on the seat, sit cross legged…”

Such an adaptable piece, it’s no wonder Nicky chose it. Togo is for its sitter, letting them decide the position that best nurtures them and their creative self. After talking to Nicky then, perhaps we can say it is the quality of connectedness we sensed. Whatever Nicky decides to involve herself in – whether it’s talking design or choosing a piece of furniture – she does with thoughtfulness and awareness. It was a treat chatting to her.

Your three great passions?
Creativity, yoga, education, food.
I couldn’t leave one out, sorry.

Your favourite works of fiction and non fiction and why?
Fiction: The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy. The writer is an absolute sorceress and transports me fully into the story, which is both beautiful and terrible.
A Tangled Web, L.M Montgomery. An old-fashioned book about a family clan, full of humour and wit.
Anything by Roald Dahl and Enid Blyton, to whom I credit my early love of books and reading.

Non-fiction: Age of Kali, William Dalrymple. Most of the books I’ve tried on the history of India and Pakistan have been quite dry but Dalrymple has a gift for narrative. It has a filmic approach in this sense – like a collection of short period stories rather than a documentary. I’m also reading the Dalai Lama’s autobiography (now 15 years old), Freedom in Exile.

Where do you turn for creative inspiration?
Conversation. Asking questions, exploring, interrogating, nudging thoughts along usually takes you to new places. Also internal conversation. Daydreaming, yoga and time alone is a constant source of ideas and realisations.

Describe or dream up the perfect corner of your home
A corner with natural light. A comfortable lounge to sit on, or a fluffy rug to sprawl on. A fireplace. A lamp for when daylight begins to dim. A side table for my cup of tea. A blanket and a book. This is the winter corner. For summer, head to the garden, replace the lounge with a towel or picnic blanket and the tea for a glass of rosé with ice. Greenery is a must in both.

Tell us about the path to becoming the editor of Habitus
I stumbled into the design world working as a studio assistant for the interiors department at Group GSA. While there I applied and was accepted into the Advanced Diploma of Interior Design through TAFE at the Design Centre Enmore, where I studied with the lovely (and hugely talented even then) Juliette Arent. I did a 1-year stint at PTW in the interiors department too. Working full-time and studying part-time made me realise I liked talking and thinking about design more than doing it, so I left my job and the course and went back to uni to study Communications at UTS with a major in Writing & Cultural Studies. It was then that I had a brainwave and thought I could combine my interests and write about design, so I approached Indesign for some work experience. That was back in 2007. I’ve been here ever since! When I went full-time after I finished my degree, I was so excited to work closely with then-Editor Paul McGillick and then-Deputy Editor Andrea Millar on a new magazine we were launching called Habitus. It’s been an amazing experience to grow with the magazine and see it develop into the multi-platform brand it is today. I still get a lot of joy from it. And am constantly inspired, stimulated and challenged too.

Three creatives who inspire you and the reasons why?
Gene Sherman of Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation – intimidatingly intelligent, yet warm and down-to-earth.

Fashion designer Alistair Trung – highly principled with a unique lens of the world. He makes the practical seem avant-garde.

Yoga pioneers Ana Forrest and Seane Corn – using yoga as a creative tool to heal and inspire change.

And television personality Lee Lin Chin for being fashion brave and hilarious.

There are many more, it’s hard to choose!

Tell us what have you learnt about the design community in Australia?
The community is strong, but the awareness of design needs to grow beyond the professional community in order to be sustainable. I would love for design, architecture and art to be as talked about in Australia as it is in Europe, as widely discussed as sport or politics. For it to be valued in an economic and cultural context. So it needs to be accessible, but in an intelligent and meaningful way – not in a fast-food, instant gratification way. As the conversation about design becomes louder, there will be more opportunity for the community to be collaborative and supportive and continue to grow.

Tell us about the chair of your choice, the Togo from Ligne Roset, I’ve heard you like sitting on the floor…. What makes it special for you? What does the chair represent for you?
I discovered this chair when scouting product for a Habitus photo shoot to represent ‘Play’ and that’s what the Togo means to me. I believe we are at our most creative and productive when we are relaxed, comfortable and having fun – the Togo encourages all of this. You can curl up on it and read, squash up next to your best friend on it, lay on the ground with your legs up on the seat, sit cross legged. It’s so flexible and casual. The construction is amazing too – 5 different densities of foam in a single seat. Quilted cover (all hand-finished) that begs you to touch and sit. Incredibly light to move around. And designed in the 1970s – possibly the coolest decade there ever was.

In/Out - CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

Credits: Photography by Luisa Brimble

CHAT IN A CHAIR: NICKY LOBO

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: G-Rough Hotel

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Like its sister hotel, Palazzina G in Venice, G-Rough celebrates history and place. Set in a tall and narrow, five-story, 17th century building – in Piazza Navona not far from Sant’Agnese church, this design hotel is a satisfying look into the real Rome.

In collaboration with architect Giorgia Cerulli, Emanuele Garosci and Gabriele Salini have created a ten-suite hotel that preserves 400 years of architectural history and at the same time presents to its visitors a contemporary Rome.

Cerulli has incorporated as much of the building’s original features as possible. Old paint and raw materials are left exposed on walls – literally revealing the layers of history embedded in the property, and wooden roofs and elaborate parquet floors reflect the Rome that once was. Perhaps the most endearing feature of the building’s age is the original Latin inscription on the facade: “SATIS AMPLA QVAE SECVRITATE RIDEAT” (meaning “big enough to give a feeling of security”).

While a definite reminder of where it has come from, G-Rough also speaks to the present. The bare walls and high oak beam ceilings of the past contrast with iconic furniture and contemporary art, reflecting the city’s continual flux and cultural development. Each of the five floors pay homage to a different Italian designer from the 1930s to the 1970s, including Ico Parisi, Giò Ponti, Guglielmo Ulrich and Aristide Seguso, and a changing display of art works from emerging Italian artists fill the walls.

In aesthetic terms, the hotel is described as ‘rough-luxury’ – a new kind of Italian luxury characterised by distressed plaster walls and mid-century Italian design. But the design far transcends being superficial; its sentiment is genuine and firmly rooted in place. “We’re presenting a very Italian sense of luxury,” says entrepreneur Gabriele Salini, “one with history, design, art, and a touch of whimsy.”

To combine original features, classic Italian design and contemporary art might sound ambitious, even confused. But here the designers have struck a meticulously crafted balance between celebrating a rich history and acknowledging an exciting present. G-Rough is eclectic but consistent in its design, playful yet grounded. And it rejoices in all that is the city of Rome; its past tied to its present, and its continual evolution of a strong culture of art and design.

Credits: G-Rough

G-Rough Hotel

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

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In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship

In/Out: Rachel Comey Flagship
Located in Soho NYC Rachel Comey’s flagship store is a perfect mix of robust and delicate, elegantly industrial and frivolously uplifting. Theatrical, in a historical context, it is full of 1950’s colour, 1980’s glamour and contemporary chic. A celebration of diverse creative minds headed by architect Elizabeth Roberts of Ensemble Architecture DPC, interior designer Charles de Lisle and Rachel Comey, this beauty was born. Comey started kicked off the creative process with ideas on materiality and worked backwards – this is what can happen when you trust your instincts.

Heralded by Leanne Shapton’s custom flag this converted mechanics garage with it’s raw hewn timber ceiling enters a new era. A heady mix of masculine and feminine, concrete floors peppered with hand placed aggravate are grounded by thick handsome stucco’d walls. A generous concrete shoe plinth is lovingly manufactured with stones from Comey’s favourite beach, and pumice from the stone wash facility. Custom Rodrigues-styled armchairs in lipstick plum are backdroped by timber imprinted concrete walls. Comey’s collections hover ethereally off the ground haloed by brushed brass hanging rails. And then there is the dressing rooms…..swoon! Pink herringbone carpet, playful apertures and discreet lighting make for a cinematic boudoir.

Not that Comey needs much help selling her brilliantly, good-looking, cohesive, tailored designs, but really who wouldn’t want to walk away with a souvenir of this beautiful experience?

Photography by Dustin Aksland

ENSEMBLE ARCHITECTURE, DPC ‘Rachel Comey Flagship’

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

Belgian artists Fien Muller and Hannes Van Severen’s of ‘Muller Van Severen’, live and work from their Belgium home, their collection drawing on the simplicity of a basic notion of furniture.

Elegantly refined, their chairs and tables are interconnected continuously, intertwined in conversation. Delicate pieces responsive in functionality are a reflection of the two artists’ focus. On the one hand Muller, a photographic artist whose contemporary still-lifes connect opposing common objects into a serene moment, and on the other, Van Severen, a sculptor whose large-scale sculptures are disjointed and quizzical.

Muller Van Severen is the meeting of the two minds; their furniture, sole objects that have an almost Bauhausian sense of rigour and order. 

Fine lines, pared back; these are modernist objects, articulated in a minimalist art form. Not shy of colour, big bursts of primary red and yellow work beautifully with aqua green and sunrise peach. Timber, metal, marble – sounds humble enough – with the touch of Muller and Van Severen these pieces are both a delicate study of frame and a meditation on materiality.

Photographed by fellow Belgian Frederik Vercruysse, with his usual minimalist touch, gives space to celebrate the unique charms of Muller & Van Severen’s work.

Credits: Courtesy of Muller Van Severen & Frederik Vercruysse

MULLER VAN SEVEREN

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

A pure philosophy of quality objects, ethically produced, both functional and decorative are core to design duo, Rachel Gant and Andrew Deming, of Yield. The self proclaimed “New American Standards”, it’s fitting that Yield is based in Saint Augustine, Florida, the oldest European settlement in the USA.

Yield is a collection of feel good objects, honest in their materiality – dull brass, copper ready for patina by many hands, calico bags with vegetable dyed tanned leather, and matte-finish ceramics – and in their production. Objects not manufactured in the USA, (such as ‘French Press’ from Hanoi in Vietnam) are diligently sourced from a Fair Trade makers around the globe.

As expressed by Yield, “Beauty, sustainability and ethical production are not at odds – they must all be considered to create something of true worth. Anything created at someone else’s expense is not beautiful and the manufacturing of disposable goods for short term benefit has robbed our natural resources for too long. We bear a responsibility to create timeless pieces that last. Buy for keeps or please do not buy at all.”

Even though Gant and Deming celebrate the classic forms they embrace the future through the collection. Gold cast rings, with names like ‘Century’, ‘Infinity’ and ‘Primary’ are three-dimensionally printed. Yield is a collision of worlds both past and present, that come together with such gracious serenity.

Credits: Yield

YIELD

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

From blue to green and every hue in-between, this is ‘Sea & Sky’, where horizons blur and perspective is lost. Forceful and thunderous, majestic and magical, this is what dreams are made of both fictional and fact, an abyss of philosophical and scientific exploration.

Dramatic inky blues and calming pale aqua greens create a palette that is at once energising and soothing. Never flat, these wondrous colours are soft, saturated, iridescent and velvety. Each and every day the hues of Sea & Sky reveal before our eyes, our most celebrated life-force and we gravitate towards their spectrum of rich colour.

Soulful by nature, placid pools give way to roaring oceans, vast blue skies transform into booming dramas overhead. Volumes of water teeming with life spinning in this atmospheric bubble, like a pulse ebbing and flowing to an ancient rhythm, we are from the sea and we breathe in the sky. Change is the only constant, at once playful and perilous, we live this dream together.

Credits
1. The Gifts of Life, Martine Emdur, Artafix, Birdcage Walk, Madmoiselle Julie, Flickr: David, My Favourite And My Best, Val Scrapbook, Bitossi Ceramiche, Anthropologie, Blueberry Modern
2. Cereal Magazine, Urban Poppy, Trevor Mein, Arhitectural Digest, Flickr: Coco Cocco, Hardwood and Hemingway, John Finger, Hermit Homewares, Muuto, Cereal Magazine
3. Wabi Sabi, Stilwerk, Broadwovens, Telio Textures, Flickr: Fiona Watson, Wabi Sabi, Flodeau, Schoolhouse Electric, Coco Lapine Design

Palette: Sea & Sky

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat
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Ludovica Serafini and Roberto Palomba of Palomba Serafini Associati‘s, Southern Italian retreat is like a museum flipped on its head. Its historically tactile shell is a perfect host for Palomba & Serafini’s collection of contemporary furniture and objects. Cavernous arches embrace this luminescent space creating a vast yet intimate interior.

Originally a 17th century oil mill in Salento, on the sub peninsula of Puglia, this majestic workhorse was conditioned to a life of darkness, now whitewashed with new apertures suddenly bathing the space in light. Local flagstones are laid as a perfect platform for the neutral palette of honest materials – timber, wool, linen and that incredible ‘Lama’ chaise lounge in straw and metal. Palomba & Serafini’s well-tailored ‘Pianoalto’ modular lounges sit generously atop ‘Karpeta’ rugs. The placement of the ‘Grand Plié’ sofa and ‘Piaffé’ table, which was designed for Driade, are heavenly when elevated on the interior courtyard. The wall of mirrored wardrobes in the bedroom add a small amount of luxe in an otherwise restrained and organic interior.

Furnished with their achievements, there is a purity throughout that embodies Palomba Serafini’s style. With a client list that includes Boffi, Cappellini, Salviati, Foscarini and Zanotta and awarded a Compasso D’Oro – Italy’s highest design prize – it’s no wonder that their family haven exudes a quiet sophistication. Enjoyed by the couple, their daughter and the family greyhounds when they retreat from the bustle of Milan, this idyllic weekender is beyond beautiful in its elegance and serenity.

Credits: Dwell, Design by Palomba Serafini AssociatesPhotography by Francesco Bolis

Palomba Serafini Associati ‘ex frantoio’

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

With the unfurling of a petal, the gentle nod of a head and the flamboyant ripple of a skirt, Dinosaur Designs‘ new collection ‘Flower’ is a blossoming of brilliant colour and life – the beautiful progression from Creative Director Louise Olsen’s 2014 Seed Pod collection.

With the artful realisation of opaque, translucent and mottled textures of resin, Olsen’s elegant structural forms are delicate yet weighty. Celebrating the “unexpected nature of nature”, ‘Flower’ evokes both fragility and strength, and continues that endless exploration of the dialogue between human and plant life.

Credits: Dinosaur Designs

Dinosaur Designs ‘Flower’

In/Out: Villa E by Studio KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO
Perched high on a hill like a modern day monastery, the ‘Villa E’, sits at the base of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Designed by Frenchmen Karl Fournier and Olivier Marty of architectural ‘Studio KO’, it is romantic minimalism at its best. Thoughtful, well-executed spaces are expansive whilst remaining intimately soothing to the soul.

Clean lines set in structural precision control the fall of natural light in to the home as it delicately casts across textural walls. Outside walls, viewed from a carefully orchestrated window are a sun-scorched terracotta, blazingly bright against the calm neutrals of the villa’s interior.

Throughout, in materiality and craftsmanship, there is a deep appreciation for the inherent beauty and sense of history found in raw materials. The dry stonewall from local Oika stone is jig-sawed by a pure artisan, it is rustic yet meditatively rigourous. Its construction is nothing short of poetic when juxtaposed with the clarity of line seen elsewhere, in the lone marble plinth, so seamless in it’s perfection.

There is a majestic sense of scale to this grand haven. From the surrounding terrain, to the built environment with its towering walls, to its almost forbidding front door and vast pivoting walls of glazing. This is a contemporary abode with its spirit firmly rooted in its surrounding environment.

Credits: Studio Ko, Photography by Dan Glasser

STUDIO KO ‘Villa E’

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