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Design & Interiors

In Out - Palette: Marble Matters

In Out - Palette: Marble Matters

In Out - Palette: Marble Matters

In Out - Palette: Marble Matters

In Out - Palette: Marble Matters

In Out - Palette: Marble Matters

In Out - Palette: Marble Matters

Rich, honest, hardworking slabs of beauty! Nothing compares to the intricate details of history that are marble’s characteristics. Whether you’re Patricia Urquiola collaborating with Budri (Earthquake 5.9 – a whole other story!) on an elaborate exhibition or e15’s Enoki side table, marble resonates with something in the depth of our being.

It’s the way that light plays with stone that dazzles and puts it into the precious category, it’s the fault lines that are taken from this earth a huge rock in itself and then designed, crafted and delivered into your modern world that is wonderful. Classic and timeless, next time you use your benchtop or step into an ornate foyer marvel at its exquisite uniqueness.

It is, was and always will be hot property as it can lift the mundane to heavenly. We constantly look forward to visiting our marble suppliers to choose slabs for our clients, perks of the job, what a treat!

Credits:
1. Stone Object
2. Wit and delight, Lonny, Simple Lovely, Fort Standard, Wallpaper,
3. Emily Hadden Blog, Fiandre, I’m Revolting, Simple Lovely, FBCDN, The Future Perfect, Julien Renault Objects, Simple Lovely, Pinterest source unknown
4. Cats>Boysfriends, Mat and me, Studio Fludd, The Edinburgh Reporter
5. e15, Fort Standard, Identical Eye, Media Cache, Luxury Interior Design Journal
6. 2 of 3 things I know, Bozarthfornell, Artnau, Melbourne Tiles, Isabel Perdomo, Emmas Design Blog, Julien Renault Objects, My Vibe My Life, The Future Perfect

Palette: Marble Matters

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

In Out - Anglepoise

The Anglepoise lamp is a true icon of British design. Since 1932 the Anglepoise has sat on the desks of writers such as Roald Dahl, been seen on the big screen as a character in Pixar’s Toy Story, in the pages of Ian McEwan’s On Chesil Beach and dancing in a Peter Gabriel video clip for 1982′s Shock the Monkey. It is a vision of a perfectly balanced mechanism with a beautifully engaging kinetic form.

It’s a brand new aesthetic for the Original 1227 Anglepoise but it isn’t at all at odds with the sense of nostalgia of the fitting which will be available later this year in muted heritage inspired tones of Elephant Grey, Deep Slate and Dusty Blue. The woven cord and brass details recall the original release of the lamp and seen here sitting alongside pieces from British furniture houses Another Country, Bethan Gray and Ercol it isn’t hard to see the pure timelessness of the Anglepoise.

Credits: Anglepoise

Anglepoise Original 1227 Brass Collection

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE

IN OUT - HARBOUR HOUSE BY ARENT&PYKE
Today we look back to the Harbour House, an Arent&Pyke project from some years ago. We like to feature our projects on In/Out not only to showcase our work but because they are often used as a reference point for exciting new projects.

The Harbour House has an exceptional view and although the harbour panoramas are irresistible, there is an inward focus – on the family being together and enjoying their home. The vast open spaces were celebrated with a sophisticated contemporary palette for the clients to enjoy dining, living, relaxing, entertaining and resting.

From the outset, the clients had a vivid image of the way they wanted to experience their new home and the landscape around it. Our intention was to bring light, sophisticated softness and warmth to the house despite the largely neutral decorative palette. The spaces are open, calm and soft and the furnishings refined. Key pieces from French furniture house Christian Liaigre are complimented by crisp white Minotti sofas and iconic pieces, such as the Taccia lamp from Flos make this interior timelessly elegant.

Credits:
Photography by Jason Busch
Styling by Megan Morton

Harbour House by Arent&Pyke

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

In Out - Retegui Marble

So, French furniture house Retegui were already blowing us away with their fine craftsmanship and what sometimes seemed impossible engineering feats but now they have lifted the bar to some incredible heights. Unveiled at Maison&Objet earlier this year are their latest marble creations Arin (a collection of dining tables) and Egala (wall shelves).

The beauty of these additions are not only the elegant lines and heartfelt simplicity of their configurations that we have come to expect from Retegui but also in the exciting combination of ancient and contemporary materials; the raw and the refined. Marble tops curve down to meet timber creating two exactly equal halves of a bullnose. Two fine horizontal lines, grand expanses of marble (the largest table being 3000 x 1150mm) are dressed to impress. The secret ingredient is the aeronautical-style honeycomb core keeping the weight down and the table up. Something of a modern day Jean Prouve.

This is the end result of a fruitful relationship between Basque designer Jean Louis Iratzoki and Claude Retegui whose family have been in the business since 1939 with of course some help from a few very clever engineers.

The new pieces join their marble cousins Petra (side tables), Domo (tableware) and Batela (trays). What a family!

Credits: Retegui Marble

Retegui

In Out - The Pavilion House shortlisted in the Australian Interior Design Awards

In Out - The Pavilion House shortlisted in the Australian Interior Design Awards

In Out - The Pavilion House shortlisted in the Australian Interior Design Awards

In Out - The Pavilion House shortlisted in the Australian Interior Design Awards

In Out - The Pavilion House shortlisted in the Australian Interior Design Awards

It is with absolute joy that we are proud to announce that our project, the Pavilion House in Sydney’s Bellevue Hill has been shortlisted for Residential Decoration in this year’s Australian Interior Design Awards. This kitchen has proven to be quite popular via our Instagram, and as seen in Belle Magazine (first the kitchen here, then the bathroom here). We are so humbled to see this project in the company of our much respected and admired contemporaries.

The Avenue House has also been nominated for the Residential Decoration and Residential Design categories. More on The Avenue soon.

We thank you all for you support. It’s a true honour.

Credits:
Styling by Megan Morton
Photography by Anson Smart

THE PAVILION HOUSE SHORTLISTED IN THE AUSTRALIAN INTERIOR DESIGN AWARDS

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

Gotta love another Online Find. Today’s is from Iacoli & McAllister, a stylistically refined and materially rigourous range of furniture, jewellery, lighting and small objects. Their craft is about beauty, quality and style and all of their work is responsibly produced in the United States. They describe there process as “one part exploration, one part learning curve, one part affection, one part sheer strife, and one part caffeine”.

We think their work speaks for it’s self and what they believe needs a moment to sparkle. Here it is, word for word. Read, look and listen up.

WE BELIEVE:

This is simultaneously the most difficult and the best thing we’ve ever set out to accomplish.

We compliment each other, most of the time.

Convention is boring.

Therapy and a cigarette will cure most anything.

Being a weekday vegan rules.

Eight weeks of vacation a year is a good place to start.

The truth always happens.

In all likelihood, you are a lovely human.

Our parents love us.

Credits: Iacoli & McAllister

Online Finds: Iacoli & McAllister

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

What a treat to introduce Sydney artist Lisa Cooper of DOCTOR COOPER STUDIO. With that alabaster skin, untamable jet black hair and intricate floral tattoo she embodies the still lives she so intuitively constructs. If you’ve ever had the luck of meeting Dr Cooper you would recognise that mischievous twinkle in her eye always present in truly gifted individuals.

With a Doctorate of Philosophy in Fine Arts she explains her studio work “as embodying human emotion thru art practice” using flowers “the greatest medium for human emotion”.

Cooper’s work is commission-based, whether it’s a floral expression for an individual, crowns for the Sydney Theatre Company or golden wreaths for Tiffany & Co. She is inspiring with her sense of social inclusiveness and is not only open to diverse briefs but excited by the challenge of left fieldness. Subscribing to her depth of soulful beauty you could approach her with any brief and she would return it with a considered, grand, yet fleeting floral testimonial.

We always feel uplifted when we see her van around knowing that we in Sydney have someone special in the fold that understands the need for personal human expression. It is a well-known fact that Dr Cooper brings such a sense of intimate joy to all that have the pleasure of working with her.

It’s no surprise then that her chair of choice is a sentimental one that has seen her through this incredible journey. A 1940’s sturdy timber chair with robust blood red upholstery and with a strong sense of history and comfort for Cooper. It’s where she sits in her St Peters studio every day conjuring up the stuff of our dreams.

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

In Out - Chat in a Chair: Lisa Cooper

Tell us about your chair? What it it’s story?
I’ve had this chair for about 15 years. It was given to me by another student at The College of Fine Arts, he was apparently ‘upgrading’ to another chair and as I had expressed affection for his chair he offered it to me. That was second year of undergrad. I have had it as my work/studio chair ever since, I’m very attached to it and intend to have it all the days of my life, god willing. I have developed all of my projects and made much of my work with its physical support. It is comfortable and ergonomic in ways that are particular to its era which I would put around 1940?

Biggest glory-moment career-wise?
My book deal. My van. The signage on my van. The first flower order from someone i didn’t know. Tiffany and Co. commission. First job for the Sydney Theatre Company. First funeral. At christmas my van was parked in Bowral and someone left a note on the windscreen that they like my work. My business card. Art Month. The MCA. Toni Maticevski. The phone call in tears because she loved the flowers so much. The ones who say they remind them of their nanna. They’re all equal.

The Doctor thing… Tell us about it.
I have a PhD in Art: ‘A Metaphysics of the Annihilation of Self in Video-Portraiture (Imaging mediations between the Human and Divine)’ – a document that speaks both of my art practice and the work that I have continued to produce with flowers as my medium. I worked very hard to achieve this degree and so the word doctor figured in naming my flower work: DOCTOR COOPER STUDIO the inclusion of my title both honours my work as an artist and academic and positions my flower work outside of the usual ‘floral’ names given to flower businesses which is useful in conveying my distinction.

Why flowers?
They are the most captivating and effective medium I have found for the expression of human emotion, which has always been the central tenant of my work.

Blundstones or RM’s?
Blundstones for work. RM’s for going out.

What gift do you give to a florist?
Bath salts, a crystal or one of Elise Pioch’s candles. Hermes.

Describe your ideal studio soundtrack
ABC FM (except when the crazy jazz comes on, I can’t abide the crazy jazz – then silence)

What is the most treasured tool of your trade?
My gold secateurs and my printer (which is why I employed my assistant Sophie, she knows how to work the printer – she’s very good)

If you could holiday for a year straight where would you go?
Marseille

What I know about people who give flowers is…
That they shall inherit the earth (the good souls).

Credits:
Photography by: Ben Pyke

CHAT IN A CHAIR: DOCTOR LISA COOPER

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

In Out - OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright's ‘Fallingwater’

Iconic architecture makes your heart sing in a way like no other. No one forgets those treasured moments spent in buildings and spaces all around the world that enliven the senses, that move and inspire us to travel more, read, eat, dance and take a moment to just take it all in and breath.

In writing a list of places to visit in a lifetime, Fallingwater by Frank Lloyd Wright could be singled out as potentially the most iconic house. Over Christmas, our designer Dominique visited the house for an in-depth tour (which allowed photos to be taken inside the house!) and today we bring to you a small snippet of her own treasured goose-bumpy moments at Fallingwater.

Fallingwater is a house like no other, built over a waterfall in Bear Run in southwest Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands. Commissioned by the Kaufmann family from Pittsburgh, the house was built between 1936 and 1939 and was owned and used by the Kaufmann family until 1963, when it was entrusted by Edgar Kaufmann, jr., to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. To date (despite conservation works), everything inside the house remains as it was in 1963 despite receiving over 4.5 million visitors.

What perhaps is most enchanting about this house is its synonymous relationship with the environment in which it is found. Despite its assertively modern conception by Wright, it is so beautifully executed as the icon of Wright’s principles of ‘organic architecture’. The landscape of the whole Laurel Highlands is reflected, is celebrated in the house – the sinuous raw winter branches, the buttery yellow of the wheat fields, the orange of the leaves in the fall, the charcoal grey of the rolling hills late afternoon, the intense snowfalls and the long hot summers. It’s raw and it’s rugged, it’s pitching a tent in a storm, it’s seeking shade on a dangerously hot day – it’s the unmistakable sense of adventure that makes this house so truly unforgettable.

The colour palette is that of the landscape injected with the modernism of Wright’s signature Cherokee red for the steel work. Brass window hardware glints in the sun like the stream which runs underneath the building. The spines of locally quarried stacked stone are built as a stylised replication of the striations of the large natural rock shelves behind the house. The bathrooms and bedrooms are modest in scale and decoration yet meticulously detailed for moments of sheer joy such as a half arc cut out in a timber desk which allows a window to swing open (see below), to fireplaces seemingly organically carved up and out of the slate floor as if it was found that way.

It is only natural that we find ourselves captivated by the interiors of the house. Everything from the materials, to the custom designed built-in joinery (Wright’s method for mitigating a furniture fit out by his clients!) to the paint colours create a unified, rigourously yet entirely organic composition.

To our modern standards there is such austerity to the interior at face value yet in the space every single detail, every texture, every material feels so harmonious to the greater context of the building and the landscape. It is one big harmonious symphony of beauty, inspiration and delight and well worth the 3 days out of New York City to get lost in Wright’s masterpiece.

Credits: Photography by Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘Fallingwater’

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

In/Out - Friday Musings: Declerq

It’s all about a passion for bending tubes. For more than half a century Belgium furniture manufacturer Declercq Mobilier have been bending for schools, institutions, restaurants and hotels, concept stores, architects and interior designers.

They bend to make timeless and iconically simple furniture of steel pipes with continuous lines creating volume. It’s furniture-making with the pure and humble idea of designing with paperclips.

Recently showcased at Maison&Objet Paris, Declercq is a bit of classroom nostalgia with the timelessness of simple, honest furniture-making with a contemporary colour pop of personality.

Credits: Declercq

Declercq Mobilier

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

In/Out - Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

It is no secret that we at Arent&Pyke are utterly obsessed with colour. We can’t say too much but we have a very exciting project in the pipeline all about it and we will be partnering with a true Australian icon of colour to bring our ideas to fruition.

Amidst all the colour-related research currently a-happening in the Arent&Pyke studio, we stumbled upon this very cute little film produced by US fashion retailer J.Crew documenting the process of producing their vibrant fabric dyes. Like so many of our inspirations the process has captivated us as much as the finished product.

Stay tuned for our exciting announcement soon.

Credits: Plenty of Colour

Friday Musings: J.Crew Colour Crazy

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