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Design & Interiors

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

In/Out: MULLER VAN SEVEREN BOOK BY FREDERIK VERCRUYSS

Belgian artists Fien Muller and Hannes Van Severen’s of ‘Muller Van Severen’, live and work from their Belgium home, their collection drawing on the simplicity of a basic notion of furniture. Elegantly refined, their chairs and tables are interconnected continuously, intertwined in conversation. Delicate pieces responsive in functionality are a reflection of the two artists’ focus. On the one hand Muller, a photographic artist whose contemporary still-lifes connect opposing common objects into a serene moment, and on the other, Van Severen, a sculptor whose large-scale sculptures are disjointed and quizzical.

Muller Van Severen is the meeting of the two minds; their furniture, sole objects that have an almost Bauhausian sense of rigour and order. 

Fine lines, pared back; these are modernist objects, articulated in a minimalist art form. Not shy of colour, big bursts of primary red and yellow work beautifully with aqua green and sunrise peach. Timber, metal, marble – sounds humble enough – with the touch of Muller and Van Severen these pieces are both a delicate study of frame and a meditation on materiality.

Photographed by fellow Belgian Frederik Vercruysse, with his usual minimalist touch, gives space to celebrate the unique charms of Muller & Van Severen’s work.

Credits: Courtesy of Muller Van Severen & Frederik Vercruysse

MULLER VAN SEVEREN

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

In/Out: YIELD

A pure philosophy of quality objects, ethically produced, both functional and decorative are core to design duo, Rachel Gant and Andrew Deming, of Yield. The self proclaimed “New American Standards”, it’s fitting that Yield is based in Saint Augustine, Florida, the oldest European settlement in the USA.

Yield is a collection of feel good objects, honest in their materiality – dull brass, copper ready for patina by many hands, calico bags with vegetable dyed tanned leather, and matte-finish ceramics – and in their production. Objects not manufactured in the USA, (such as ‘French Press’ from Hanoi in Vietnam) are diligently sourced from a Fair Trade makers around the globe.

As expressed by Yield, “Beauty, sustainability and ethical production are not at odds – they must all be considered to create something of true worth. Anything created at someone else’s expense is not beautiful and the manufacturing of disposable goods for short term benefit has robbed our natural resources for too long. We bear a responsibility to create timeless pieces that last. Buy for keeps or please do not buy at all.”

Even though Gant and Deming celebrate the classic forms they embrace the future through the collection. Gold cast rings, with names like ‘Century’, ‘Infinity’ and ‘Primary’ are three-dimensionally printed. Yield is a collision of worlds both past and present, that come together with such gracious serenity.

Credits: Yield

YIELD

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

In/Out - PALETTE: Sea & Sky

From blue to green and every hue in-between, this is ‘Sea & Sky’, where horizons blur and perspective is lost. Forceful and thunderous, majestic and magical, this is what dreams are made of both fictional and fact, an abyss of philosophical and scientific exploration.

Dramatic inky blues and calming pale aqua greens create a palette that is at once energising and soothing. Never flat, these wondrous colours are soft, saturated, iridescent and velvety. Each and every day the hues of Sea & Sky reveal before our eyes, our most celebrated life-force and we gravitate towards their spectrum of rich colour.

Soulful by nature, placid pools give way to roaring oceans, vast blue skies transform into booming dramas overhead. Volumes of water teeming with life spinning in this atmospheric bubble, like a pulse ebbing and flowing to an ancient rhythm, we are from the sea and we breathe in the sky. Change is the only constant, at once playful and perilous, we live this dream together.

Credits
1. The Gifts of Life, Martine Emdur, Artafix, Birdcage Walk, Madmoiselle Julie, Flickr: David, My Favourite And My Best, Val Scrapbook, Bitossi Ceramiche, Anthropologie, Blueberry Modern
2. Cereal Magazine, Urban Poppy, Trevor Mein, Arhitectural Digest, Flickr: Coco Cocco, Hardwood and Hemingway, John Finger, Hermit Homewares, Muuto, Cereal Magazine
3. Wabi Sabi, Stilwerk, Broadwovens, Telio Textures, Flickr: Fiona Watson, Wabi Sabi, Flodeau, Schoolhouse Electric, Coco Lapine Design

Palette: Sea & Sky

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

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In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

3_ps

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Palomba Italian Retreat
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Ludovica Serafini and Roberto Palomba of Palomba Serafini Associati‘s, Southern Italian retreat is like a museum flipped on its head. Its historically tactile shell is a perfect host for Palomba & Serafini’s collection of contemporary furniture and objects. Cavernous arches embrace this luminescent space creating a vast yet intimate interior.

Originally a 17th century oil mill in Salento, on the sub peninsula of Puglia, this majestic workhorse was conditioned to a life of darkness, now whitewashed with new apertures suddenly bathing the space in light. Local flagstones are laid as a perfect platform for the neutral palette of honest materials – timber, wool, linen and that incredible ‘Lama’ chaise lounge in straw and metal. Palomba & Serafini’s well-tailored ‘Pianoalto’ modular lounges sit generously atop ‘Karpeta’ rugs. The placement of the ‘Grand Plié’ sofa and ‘Piaffé’ table, which was designed for Driade, are heavenly when elevated on the interior courtyard. The wall of mirrored wardrobes in the bedroom add a small amount of luxe in an otherwise restrained and organic interior.

Furnished with their achievements, there is a purity throughout that embodies Palomba Serafini’s style. With a client list that includes Boffi, Cappellini, Salviati, Foscarini and Zanotta and awarded a Compasso D’Oro – Italy’s highest design prize – it’s no wonder that their family haven exudes a quiet sophistication. Enjoyed by the couple, their daughter and the family greyhounds when they retreat from the bustle of Milan, this idyllic weekender is beyond beautiful in its elegance and serenity.

Credits: Dwell, Design by Palomba Serafini AssociatesPhotography by Francesco Bolis

Palomba Serafini Associati ‘ex frantoio’

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

Dinosaur Designs 'Flower'

With the unfurling of a petal, the gentle nod of a head and the flamboyant ripple of a skirt, Dinosaur Designs‘ new collection ‘Flower’ is a blossoming of brilliant colour and life – the beautiful progression from Creative Director Louise Olsen’s 2014 Seed Pod collection.

With the artful realisation of opaque, translucent and mottled textures of resin, Olsen’s elegant structural forms are delicate yet weighty. Celebrating the “unexpected nature of nature”, ‘Flower’ evokes both fragility and strength, and continues that endless exploration of the dialogue between human and plant life.

Credits: Dinosaur Designs

Dinosaur Designs ‘Flower’

In/Out: Villa E by Studio KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO

In/Out: VILLA E BY STUDIO KO
Perched high on a hill like a modern day monastery, the ‘Villa E’, sits at the base of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Designed by Frenchmen Karl Fournier and Olivier Marty of architectural ‘Studio KO’, it is romantic minimalism at its best. Thoughtful, well-executed spaces are expansive whilst remaining intimately soothing to the soul.

Clean lines set in structural precision control the fall of natural light in to the home as it delicately casts across textural walls. Outside walls, viewed from a carefully orchestrated window are a sun-scorched terracotta, blazingly bright against the calm neutrals of the villa’s interior.

Throughout, in materiality and craftsmanship, there is a deep appreciation for the inherent beauty and sense of history found in raw materials. The dry stonewall from local Oika stone is jig-sawed by a pure artisan, it is rustic yet meditatively rigourous. Its construction is nothing short of poetic when juxtaposed with the clarity of line seen elsewhere, in the lone marble plinth, so seamless in it’s perfection.

There is a majestic sense of scale to this grand haven. From the surrounding terrain, to the built environment with its towering walls, to its almost forbidding front door and vast pivoting walls of glazing. This is a contemporary abode with its spirit firmly rooted in its surrounding environment.

Credits: Studio Ko, Photography by Dan Glasser

STUDIO KO ‘Villa E’

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out: PUMPHOUSE POINT

Nestled in Cradle Mountain/Lake St Clair National Park, in Tasmania, siting regally out on Lake St Clair sits ‘Pumphouse Point’. The hotel, is a whimsical gem of industry, repurposed as a contemplative retreat. Built in the 1930’s to house the water turbines for the State’s hydropower system, the exterior shell has been left as is. Weather beaten and lichen covered, it’s surface is a visual history of 85 years of industrial endurance.

The brainchild of tourism entrepreneur Simon Currant, ‘Pumphouse Point’ was realized with the help of Hobart & Launceston-based architect Peter Walker of Cumulus Studio. A second generation Taswegian Walker’s, affiliation with the treasured landscape of his homeland is evident in the design. Walker says, “From inception we envisaged that the Pumphouse Point redevelopment should encapsulate rugged simplicity and unrefined comfort”. This is an honest retreat for lovers of the vast outdoors.

‘Pumphouse Point’ consists of two buildings; The Pumphouse perched out on the lake, and The Shorehouse 250m inland both connected by a dramatically straight concrete pier. The 18 suites are bare bones cosy. Local Tasmanian Oak, wool carpet, wool felted blankets atop crisp white sheets are all you need. Exposed brass pipes pump pristine water into your monochromatic bathroom. Tranquil sanctuaries, the common spaces have combustion fires to warm your body as you stare out at the wonder of nature.

The original structures are off-form concrete, their recent incarnation embracing the industrial history engrained in the fabric of the buildings whilst being snug with creature comforts. A spectacular place of solace with a true frontier spirit!

Credits: Pumphouse Point
Photohgraphy by:
Adam John Gibson and Stuart Gibson 

OUT/ABOUT: PUMPHOUSE POINT

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The Hotel Covell in Los Feliz, the epicentre of Los Angeles’ east-side hipster scene, has been called a modern day descendant of the Chateau Marmont, born with old soul. Set within a 1930s building over bar owner and entrepreneur Dustin Lancaster’s Bar Covell and designed by Sally Breer of Co-Mingle, the five-room hotel is a snapshot of five chapters in the life of a fictional bon-vivant writer character named ‘George Covell’. Loosely shaped by the collective stories of Lancaster & Breer’s own lives, Covell’s fictional tale is narrated from room to room starting in his hometown Oklahoma journeying to New York, with a brief sojourn to Paris and to his adventures beyond.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter One, called the ‘Oklahoma Room’, imagines George Covell’s rustic and earthy hometown and is inspired by the Mid-West with its humble sense of comfort, recycled timber and aged leather.

Chapter Two, the ‘1950s NYC Flat’, takes us to Covell’s new found world of industrial and functional rigour. Modernist design inspirations (the design of Room 02 is so very Charlotte Perriand) share the stage with iconic midcentury design classics by the likes of Charles and Ray Eames.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Chapter 3, ‘A Parisian Atelier’ imagines the lodging of Covell’s girlfriend with soft textures and a bohemian feminine sensibility. A blush pink Eileen Gray Bibendum chair alludes to the romance of Covell’s 1970s Parisian dalliance.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

The richly layered, palette of Chapter Four ‘Supreme’, finds our character George Covell adding to his collection with travels far and wide to Monaco and India.

His story, concludes with Chapter Five ‘The Heir’, envisaging the apartment Covell’s Paris-raised daughter inhabits, surrounded by her father’s life-long collection of treasures, back in New York city in the late 1970s and ‘80s.

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: HOTEL COVELL

Credits: Sally Breer & Hotel Covell

HOTEL COVELL

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

In/Out: SPRING RESTAURANT

Spring restaurant is a family affair with the kind of familiar warmth and ambience one might expect from the former Vogue food editor Skye Gyngell in this, her first solo venture. Designed by Gyngell’s sister, Sydney-based interior designer Briony Fitzgerald, Spring has a layered, feminine elegance which sits with charm and poise within the New Wing of the iconic neo-classical Somerset House in London.

There is an ease to the elegance and a purity to the focus at Spring. Food “is celebrated for its conviviality and the joyfulness of sharing seasonal produce”, a simple philosophy which extends through the interior design to enrich the experience of dining. Statement pieces of furniture and lighting are allowed their space giving the visitor time and serenity with which to contemplate the beauty of each piece over the fussiness of excessive detail.

The light-flooded white walled room with large arched windows and lofty ceilings have been dressed with a carefully curated palette of saddle leather, soft grey blue, brass, copper and baby pinks. Atop the wide danish oak floors sits a roomful of the iconic Cassina Cab chair, in their tanned perfection, eagerly awaiting the patina of time. Bookending the main dining space are a line of Mayor sofas by Danish architects Arne Jacobsen and Flemming Lassen in dark grey/brown and in pink delicately, paired with e15’s Habibi tables. The bar’s bold book-matched marble is framed by Vico Magistretti’s gold Atollo lamps and New York based Apparatus Studio’s hand-blown glass Cloud chandeliers.

Gracing the walls of Spring are works by esteemed British artists. ‘Peonies’, created by gilded glass artist Emma Peascod is a five panelled 22ct gold leaf, silver leaf and Japanese paper piece which announces the entrance area while Valeria Nascimento’s delicate white porcelain ‘Blossoming’ of flower motifs in various states of opening scatter the soft blue grey walls of the main dining room.

Within the centre of Spring is a beautifully serene garden atrium, an oasis of calm by acclaimed garden designer Jinny Blom. The walls of the atrium lined with panels, each bearing the fossil-like form of a huge Gunnera manicata leaf. Blom describes her intervention as “mineral-like, stony, cool, green and as natural as possible… a hint of a grotto or a ruined castle”.

The casual boxy shift dresses, delicate stripes, small black ribbons and canvas plimsolls of the uniforms by celebrated designers Egg and Trager Delaney celebrate the simplicity and the sophistication of how best to achieve a considered sense of grace and style.

Spring is honest, heartfelt, wholesome elegance at its best.

Image Credits Via: Spring Restaurant Studio Peascod Yatzer and Escapade with photography by Paul Massey and Tom Mannion for Vogue Living

SPRING

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In/Out: 'Home Couture' By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

In an ongoing fruitful relationship between Milano design studio Studiopepe and furniture showroom Spotti Milano, ‘Home Couture’ comes to life. With that quintessentially Italian sense of opulence, ‘Home Couture’ is warm, sincere and unapologetically grandiose.

Hand-picked design heroes, the ‘Lucrezia’ sofa and ‘Febo’ chaise by Maxalto, the Corbusier ‘LC2’ armchair, Classicon’s ‘Bell’ table and Serge Mouille’s ‘Lampadaire 3 Bras’ make for a perfect tête-a-tête in the living room. The library party of the ‘Freud’ daybed and Carl Hansen ‘CH25’ chairs is presided over by the B&]B Italia ‘Flat C’ wall system. The dining room with ‘Pathos’ table and ‘Recipio’ console by Maxalto keep company with Knoll’s ‘Conference’ table and ‘Platner’ chairs.

The stone clad textured walls by Salvatori create a lavish backdrop and fabric panels and generous drops of velvet curtains in blush and peacock blue add to the vertical drama of the spaces.

Rich, yet restrained, ‘Home Couture’ is Italy at its tailored best, complimenti Studiopepe!

Credits:Studiopepe
Photography by Silvia Rivoltella

‘Home Couture’ By Studiopepe at Spotti Milano

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