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Design & Interiors

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects
In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Vega Cottage - Kolman Boye Architects

Vega Cottage, designed by Swedish architects, Kolman Boye, is dwelling acutely in tune with its sublime surroundings. Nestled on the island of Vega in the Norwegian archipelago, and based on the traditional Norwegian fishermen huts (called Naust) it is a lesson in non-invasive architecture.

Built for siblings to revisit their childhood place of solace, the interior in linseed oil painted pine and birch is a glowing den, as pure as its organic surrounds. Generous windows frame magnificently wild vistas of weather-beaten shrubs and craggy granite mountains.

With respect and restraint the landscape’s new guest does not disturb the bedrock. Instead, visitors must arrive by a natural ravine open to the elements, its dialogue never static. As the happy occupants state, “The access should be a process. Walking up to the building prepares you for the environment and adapts you to it.”

This kind of retreat is meditative to the point of religious, a simple place of worship to the most beautiful divinity, ‘Mother Nature’.

Credits: Kolman Boye

Vega Cottage by Kolman Boye Architects

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

It is that time of year where we savour the delights of Maison&Objet Paris and bring you just a few of the many treasures, freshly handpicked by Arent&Pyke 2015 just for you!

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

One of our favourite Danish companies, Menu and their classic ‘Afternoon’ lounge chair in black and tan. With hints of the Thonet Corbusier, the ‘Afternoon’ has a restrained, contemporary twist.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Gam Fratesi‘s sublime ‘Karui’ (Japanese for ‘soft and light’) trays, for Swedish Skultuna. With soft leather interior bases and spun brass casings, they just as their name suggests.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Menu takes simple forms to create little pieces of magic like the ‘Bougeoir Optical’.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Czech brand, Brokis and their ‘Muffin’ lamp. It may not be new to the scene, but we love the new Nordic white washed finish.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Michael Anastassiades‘ minimalist shelf, ‘Étagère Square’ in marble and stainless steel, for French brand Coedition is an example of pure architectural engineering.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Ligne Roset comes up trumps with Brazilian designer René Barba’s ‘Lampes à poser’ paper lamp. Made from a blend of polyamide and polyester this tear-proof fabric creates a soft geometric diffused light.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

The glossy ‘Container’, from German brand Pulpo by Sebastian Herkner, in rose and gold topped with royal blue lids are versatile in size and make perfect shelf highlights.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Jaime Hayon does it again with his ‘Titus’ vases for Italian brand Paola C. Roman. Suggestive of ancient day vessels, in rose petal pink, deep sage and blue grey, these vases are true beauties.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

The ‘Oda’ Lamp also by Sebastian Herkner for Pulpo has a weightlessness, like a lantern about to take flight.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Superstar Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Luna’ Cabinet for French brand Coedition has personality plus. We feel like this may be the answer to todays apéritif bar.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

In colour saturated transparents, Christophe Pillet’s ‘Ilia’ tables are divine little sidekicks.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

The soft graphic patterns in ‘Marius’, handtufted in cotton, make for a refreshing look from French designer Ines de La Fressange.

 

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Another Danish favourite Ferm Living, bring us ‘Collect’ vases. Quiet achievers, they are dusty matte tactile surfaces.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Too cool Studio Pool brings us the ‘Circle’ Chair by Remi Bouhaniche in many flavoursome colours.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Iittala’s ‘Ruutu’ vases, with their diamond shapes, overlap and layer creating glass sculptural optical delights.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Cinna also got some Remi Bouhaniche talent when he designed the ‘Toa’ for them. A giant pillow of comfort perched atop its steel legs, it is just waiting for a weary body to cuddle.

In/Out: Maison Object 2015

Danish brand &Tradition brings us ‘True Colours’, a contemplative collection of material dialogues.

Credits: AD Magazine

OUT/ABOUT: MAISON&OBJET PARIS 2015

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

In/Out: 'Monday Shower Songs' Leanne Shapton

New Yorker, Leanne Shapton’s watercolours ‘Monday Shower Songs’ are exactly what they suggest, cosmetic vessels of morning rituals teamed up with classic ballads. Having art directed in some very big named publications, including the New York Times, Shapton’s sense of visual balance is arresting in this celebration of the ordinary.

Soap, shampoo, creams, shavers, tweezers, fliptops, nozzles and jars all make it into this parade of colour and shape. Shapton reminds us of the simple pleasures; the colours almost correlating the delight of belting out a classic tune in the privacy of your bathroom. Moody, muted, tones mixed with bright bursts of orange, pink and yellow. Your mental jukebox locates each song and you catch yourself smiling, this is a universal recollection, the start of a new day, clean and free.

Appearing in The New York Times on the last week of each month, Shapton’s series have featured on In/Out quite some time ago. Our delight in Shapton’s work continues.

Leanne Shapton is also one part of J&L Books, a non-profit publishing house that produces contemporary artist limited edition books.

Credits: NY Times

LEANNE SHAPTON ‘MONDAY SHOWER SONGS’

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Living Edge Showroom Launch

Sydney is in for yet another treat with the launch of Living Edge’s new showroom opening this week in the Woolstores, Alexandria. Previously, spread over two showrooms they’ve united to showcase the cache of treasures they are so known and loved for.

Ranging from the timeless classics of Herman Miller, Walter Knoll and Louis Poulsen to the future classics of e15, La Chance and Established&Sons, the showroom is a beautifully restrained, minimalist canvas for such exceptional talent. Designed by Woods Bagot, the space’s characteristic warehouse bones are celebrated yet its reincarnation is sleek.

On the ground floor, a series of dedicated platforms are offered up to each of the brands they represent. The brief was to; “create a series of mini environments… allowing each brand its own designated space using different materials and finishes to create a unique backdrop for their product”. A cosy e15 party incorporates one of our new favourites, the Enoki side table, while the Walter Knoll loungeroom with the Flow Chair and Grand Suite Sofa presides over the double height space.

The mezzanine is dedicated to Herman Miller’s “Living Office” concept. This enables the team at Living Edge to not only work within this environment, but to also offer a seductive testament to the end user of how function and form can unite in the workspace. As they put it; “It has completely changed our way of working and I think we’ll continue to see more benefits, not only in terms of the client interface but internally as well.”

The overarching concept is to showcase each of the Living Edge brands in their own dedicated space. It’s a move towards an exhibition-style showroom experience – our customers should feel as though they’re walking through the Milan Furniture Fair (without the hordes!). Each furniture ‘pod’ is designed to be true to the aesthetic of the brand it represents.

Tailored for the refined connoisseur looking for an Eames Classic Lounge & Ottoman, or the contemporary collector after La Chance’s Bolt Stool, Living Edge’s new Woolstore, Alexandria, showroom is now open.

Photo Credits: Living Edge

OUT/ABOUT: ‘Living Edge’ Showroom Launch

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo
In/Out: Geoffrey Bawa Number 11 Colombo

Number 11, Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa’s private residence in Colombo, is an eclectic lesson in refined taste. At once architecturally cultured and almost primitively executed, it is peppered with unexpected follies and exotic moments of the outside brought in.

Elegant and raw, tactile rendered walls meet glossy epoxied floors and heavy thick arched walls provide cool comfort. Intricate traditional carved timber doors and columns represent the abundant local craftsmanship. Peppered around the house are Bawa’s own furniture designs, prototypes for the pieces he designed for hotels and homes around the country and the world, a delicate combination of new vision and traditional materials. Meticulous attention to decorative detail are present in Bawa designed glass and brass wall sconce and sinuous cast wrought iron balustrade, which snakes from the ground floor up the tower to the roof terrace.

Sensitive to his tropical surroundings Bawa’s house is abundant in air and light. Areas are separated by gardens and courtyards so short courtyard exterior vistas are always present. Rustic stones inlaid in the floor or an impromptu stone bench are constant reminders of the relationship between the built environment and nature. It’s this perfect interior/exterior balance that creates such an idyllic tranquil gallery-esque home.

Alive with culture, his highly curated interiors include textile masterpieces by Ena de Silva and hand-painted doors by Australian artist Donald Friend (the originals of which can be found in the Art Gallery of New South Wales). Skillful at uniting the unlikely, religious artefacts preside over contemporary sculpture in a pastiche of exotic, vernacular, tribal and modern influences.

Recently visited by Arent&Pyke designer Dominique, the exotic enchantment and timelessness of Bawa’s own home is undeniably captivating. Bawa’s mix of Asian soul and European education is clearly expressed in his architectural and interior genius.

The doors of Bawa home are thrown open to visitors for accommodation and house tours.

Photography by: Dominique Brammah

OUT/ABOUT: Geoffrey Bawa’s House, Colombo Sri Lanka

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

In/Out - Alex Proba

For German-born New-York based Alex Proba, ‘A Poster A Day’ project, is a daily exercise. An impulsive personal visual journal in poster format, her theme although abstract to most is clear as written word to her.

Currently working as the Art Director for Kickstarter, Alex found herself at a loss one day, and instead of her usual escapades into inspiration she started graphically doodling. Realising how much she was enjoying the process of creating freely, with no preconceived thought pattern, she decided to dedicate 30 minutes a day to expressing her instinctual intellect through collaging. As Proba puts it “there are many days when abstraction guides my design, and for some it may be hard to imagine what my day looked liked based on purely graphical posters. But for me, it’s the alignment of occurrences that make me explore symmetry, geometric shapes, and patterns.…….. Previously, I wasn’t even able to remember what I ate the day before. The posters restore my past, and that’s magical and beautiful.”

Having exhibited her first year at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg, New York, she is now looking forward to the next year of ‘Yours-A Poster A Day’. Shifting attention from herself to other peoples stories Alex is calling for submissions to interpret into her astute graphic dialect in 2015.

Credits: Studio Proba

ALEX PROBA ‘A POSTER A DAY’

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

In/Out: Winter Bloom - Studio Pepe

Milano-based Studiopepe does it once again with their ‘Winter Bloom’ dressing for Milan furniture showroom Spotti. Setting a vibrant domestic scene, Studiopepe did away with cosy colours embracing the full spectrum of vivid blues creating energetic styled montages.

The monochromatic stage is highly textured with rough rendered walls in battleship grey and peacock blue. Scenes are layered with quilted circular fabric backdrops and uniform rugs (both plush and distressed) sitting on jet black floorboards. Cole&Sons ‘Royal Garden’ wallpaper, with its berries and birds, is the one exception to this minimalist pattern party.

This story is distinctly Studiopepe with their good-natured, restrained epitome of style. Their own hands-on-hips ‘Kora vase’, along with Flos Lighting’s ‘Snoopy’ lamp sits cockily atop Superstudio’s ‘Quaderna’ table. George Nelson ‘Bubble’ pendants are reflected above Marsotto’s sublime ‘Topkapi’ console, while Lamp Gras’s ‘N°214’ surveys the scene. Finn Juhl’s ‘Chieftain Chair’ keeps company with Maxalto’s ‘Febo’ bed, the only room where a touch of pink has been allowed.

With a smorgasboard of design classics and contemporaries at hand, Studiopepe’s ‘Winter Bloom’ is a carefully curated vision of the modern European winter den.

Credits: Trendland

‘WINTER BLOOM’ BY STUDIOPEPE

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: Sculptor Barber

‘Sculptor Barber’ in Taiwan perfectly marries the nostalgic with minimalism. For the well-heeled gentlemen it is a sanctuary of serenity where men preen for the benefit of us all. Hats off to them!

Gallery-esque bones and walls of windows allow generous light to flood in creating a zen base. Lean-to panes of mirror and neon font offset saddle leather, dark timbers, and the classic comfort of traditional barber chairs. The added touch of banana palms and ficus fig trees give the space a punch of colour and organic energy, while Rubn ‘Vox’ pendants in brass and etched glass add just the right amount of masculine adornment.

Thumbs up to ‘Union Atelier’ for creating a well-rounded grooming salon for the 21st century man!

Credits: Union Atelier

OUT/ABOUT: SCULPTOR BARBER

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - Carolina Castiglioni

Nestled in a former Milan factory sits Carolina Castiglioni’s family home. Full of soul it is a treasure trove of vintage eclecticism, bursting with colourful vitality.

Carolina is the Director of Special Projects for Marni, and daughter of Marni’s Designer, the talented Consuelo Castiglioni. Looking at her house you can see why she would be perfect for such a job. It’s not overdesigned but a testament to her commitment for pieces that have historical context. As she puts it “I tend to gravitate towards vintage design that has a more innovative aspect”. Surrounded by heroes of the past certainly gives you the momentum to explore the future. Take for example the wonderful terrace chairs from Marni’s ‘Animal House’.

Shared with her husband, Architect Federico Ferrari, and their son, Filippo, first and foremost it is a family home full to the brim with things of beauty. Each piece loving sourced like the inky black dining table, initially in bad nick they restored the black lacquer to its now mirror finish. It’s a tribute to Carolina’s creative mind, and so with this insight into her daily life, we look forward to the next ‘special project’ from Marni.

Credits: The Selby

Carolina Castiglioni

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

In/Out - OUT/ABOUT: El Fenn Hotel

Aaahhhhh welcome to ‘El Fenn’. Set in the heart of Marrakech this luxury retreat fully embraces the romantic artisan architecture and age-old crafts of Morocco. In a city littered with lively riads ‘El Fenn’ stands out from the crowd, thoughtfully engaging a traditional home with contemporary furniture and art.

When Vanessa Branson (yes sister of) and her business partner stumbled across this majestic but dilapidated home they knew that it was a gem too bright to keep to themselves. Respectfully restored and renovated, intricate metal and timber detailing is abundant, glorious stone and mosaic tiled floors are scattered with Berber rugs, ceilings are high and considered, and colour is BIG, oh so wonderfully BIG.

It’s been a progressive project that now includes 28 rooms, a massive roof terrace, rose gardens, numerous pools, a family of tortoises… are you getting the picture? Complementing the magnificent textural and visual architecture of this hotel is Branson’s private collection of artwork. Ranging from David Shrigley to Terence Donavan and Bridget Riley this is part gallery, part traveller’s haven.

‘El Fenn’, it’s only fitting for such a bewitching city!

Credits: El Fenn
Photography Credits: David Loftus, Joanna Vestey, Terry Munson

OUT/ABOUT: EL FENN HOTEL

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